Franklin Institute Awards

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For other uses of "Benjamin Franklin Medal", see Benjamin Franklin Medal (disambiguation).

The Franklin Institute Awards (or Benjamin Franklin Medal) is a science and engineering award presented since 1824 by the Franklin Institute, of Philadelphia, PA, USA.[1] The Franklin Institute Awards comprises the Benjamin Franklin Medals in seven areas of science and engineering, the Bower Awards and Prize for Achievement in Science, and the Bower Award for Business Leadership.[2]

Benjamin Franklin Medals[edit]

In 1998, the Benjamin Franklin Medals were created by reorganizing all of the endowed medals presented by The Franklin Institute at that time, into a group medals recognizing seven areas of study: Chemistry, Computer and Cognitive Science, Earth and Environmental Science, Electrical Engineering, Life Science, Mechanical Engineering, and Physics. The first Benjamin Franklin Medals were presented in 1998. [2]

Medalists are selected by Committee on Science and the Arts (CS&A) after thorough investigation.[3]

Bower Awards[edit]

The Bower Award and Prize for Achievement in Science and the Bower Award for Business Leadership are the newest awards, established by a $7.5 million bequest from Henry Bower in 1988.[2]

Partial list of laureates[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Franklin Institute Awards". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  2. ^ a b c "About The Franklin Institute Awards | The Franklin Institute". www.fi.edu. Retrieved 2016-06-24. 
  3. ^ "Committee on Science & the Arts | The Franklin Institute". www.fi.edu. Retrieved 2016-06-24. 
  4. ^ Fernandez, Bob (March 14, 2015). "Jon Huntsman Sr. wins Franklin Institute's Bower Award". Philadelphia Inquirer. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  5. ^ "Jean-Pierre Kruth". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  6. ^ "Stephen J. Lippard". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  7. ^ "Elissa L. Newport". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  8. ^ "Syukuro Manabe". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  9. ^ "Roger F. Harrington". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  10. ^ "Cornelia Bargmann". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  11. ^ "Charles L. Kane". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  12. ^ "Eugene J. Mele". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 
  13. ^ "Shoucheng Zhang". The Franklin Institute. Retrieved 2 December 2015. 

Sources[edit]