Benzoguanamine

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Benzoguanamine
Benzoguanamine.svg
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
6-Phenyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4-diamine
Other names
Diamino-6-phenyl-1,3,5-triazine
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.001.905 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 202-095-6
RTECS number
  • XY700000
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C9H9N5/c10-8-12-7(13-9(11)14-8)6-4-2-1-3-5-6/h1-5H,(H4,10,11,12,13,14) checkY
    Key: GZVHEAJQGPRDLQ-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • Nc1nc(c2ccccc2)nc(N)n1
Properties
C9H9N5
Molar mass 187.206 g·mol−1
Appearance White solid
Density 1.42 g cm−3
Melting point 227–228 °C (441–442 °F; 500–501 K)
Hazards
GHS labelling:
GHS06: ToxicGHS07: Exclamation mark
Warning
H302, H331, H332, H412
P261, P264, P270, P271, P273, P301+P312, P304+P312, P304+P340, P311, P312, P321, P330, P403+P233, P405, P501
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
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Benzoguanamine is an organic compound with the chemical formula (CNH2)2(CC6H5)N3. It is related to melamine but with one amino group replaced by phenyl. Benzoguanamine is used in the manufacturing of melamine resins. Unlike melamine ((CNH2)3N3), benzoguanamine is not a crosslinker. The "benzo" prefix is historical, as the compound contains phenyl, not a benzo group. A related compound is acetoguanamine.[1]

The compound is prepared by condensation of cyanoguanidine with benzonitrile.[2]

Benzoguanamine synthesis01.svg

Safety[edit]

LD50 (oral, rats) is 1470 mg/kg.

References[edit]

  1. ^ H. Deim, G. Matthias, R. A. Wagner (2012). "Amino Resins". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a02_115.pub2. ISBN 978-3527306732.{{cite encyclopedia}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)
  2. ^ J. K. Simons, M. R. Saxton (1953). "Benzoguanamine". Org. Synth. 33: 13. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.033.0013.{{cite journal}}: CS1 maint: uses authors parameter (link)