Bergen Point Plank Road

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The Jersey City and Bergen Point Plank Road was a road in the 19th century in Hudson County, New Jersey, United States which ran between Paulus Hook and Bergen Point. The company which built the road received its charter on March 6, 1850.[1][2][3] to improve one that had been built in the 18th century.[4][5] It has subsequently become Grand Street and Garfield Avenue in Jersey City and Broadway in Bayonne.[6] It was during the 19th century that plank roads were built, often by private companies as turnpike roads, in this case with a tollgate at Communipaw Junction.[7] As the name suggests, wooden boards were laid on a roadbed in order to prevent horse-drawn carriages and wagons from sinking into softer ground on the portions of the road.

The route of the road travelled from the Hudson River at Paulus Hook to Communipaw Junction where a toll was collected. It then ran parallel to the Morris Canal through Greenville to Curries Woods.,[8] passing through Bayview – New York Bay Cemetery. Crossing the canal at Pamrapo, it proceeded south into Saltersville and Centerville ending at Bergen Point. Transfer to ferries to Elizabethport across Newark Bay, and to Staten Island across Kill van Kull were possible.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Unofficial New Jersey Route Log
  2. ^ Thomas F. Gordon, A Gazetteer of the State of New Jersey, 1834, pp. 17-18 Laws of the State of New Jersey, 1811, pp. 337-340
  3. ^ Timeline for the Founding and History of the City of Bayonne, Bayonne Historical Society. Retrieved August 21, 2009.
  4. ^ "Petitions and Other Papers relating to Bridges, Canals, Dams, Ferries and Roads, 1765- 1835" (PDF). New Jersey State Archives Collection Guide. New Jersey Department of State. Retrieved 2012-11-11. 
  5. ^ http://www.getnj.com/jchist/47a.shtml
  6. ^ Hudson County New Jersey Street Map. Hagstrom Map Company, Inc. 2008. ISBN 0-88097-763-9. 
  7. ^ "The Storm at Jersey City, Newark, and Paterson". The New York Times. August 8, 1853. Retrieved July 30, 2011. 
  8. ^ Greenville[permanent dead link]

Coordinates: 40°43′02″N 74°03′42″W / 40.717119°N 74.061574°W / 40.717119; -74.061574