Berkeley Township, New Jersey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Berkeley Township, New Jersey
Township of Berkeley
Island Beach State Park
Motto(s): 
"From the shores of the Atlantic Ocean to the serenity of the Pine Barrens"[1]
Map of Berkeley Township in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Map of Berkeley Township in Ocean County. Inset: Location of Ocean County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Berkeley Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Berkeley Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°54′46″N 74°11′35″W / 39.912906°N 74.193095°W / 39.912906; -74.193095Coordinates: 39°54′46″N 74°11′35″W / 39.912906°N 74.193095°W / 39.912906; -74.193095[2][3]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Ocean
IncorporatedMarch 31, 1875
Named forJohn Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton
Government
 • TypeFaulkner Act (mayor–council)
 • BodyTownship Council
 • MayorCarmen F. Amato Jr. (R, term ends December 31, 2023)[4][5]
 • AdministratorJohn Camera[6]
 • Municipal clerkBeverly M. Carle[7]
Area
 • Total54.25 sq mi (140.51 km2)
 • Land42.72 sq mi (110.64 km2)
 • Water11.53 sq mi (29.87 km2)  21.26%
Area rank31st of 565 in state
6th of 33 in county[2]
Elevation36 ft (11 m)
Population
 • Total41,255
 • Estimate 
(2019)[14]
42,036
 • Rank49th of 566 in state
6th of 33 in county[15]
 • Density962.5/sq mi (371.6/km2)
 • Density rank388th of 566 in state
20th of 33 in county[15]
Time zoneUTC−05:00 (Eastern (EST))
 • Summer (DST)UTC−04:00 (Eastern (EDT))
ZIP Code
08721[16]
Area code(s)732 exchanges: 237, 269, 606[17]
FIPS code3402905305[2][18][19]
GNIS feature ID0882073[2][20]
Websitetwp.berkeley.nj.us

Berkeley Township is a township in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the township population had increased to 41,255,[11][12][13] reflecting an increase of 1,264 (+3.2%) from the 39,991 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 2,672 (+7.2%) from the 37,319 counted in the 1990 Census.[21] the highest recorded in any decennial census.

Berkeley Township was incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 31, 1875, from portions of Dover Township (now Toms River Township). Sections of the township were taken to form Seaside Park (March 3, 1898), Seaside Heights (February 6, 1913), Beachwood (March 22, 1917), Ocean Gate (February 28, 1918) Pine Beach (February 26, 1925), South Toms River (March 28, 1927) and Island Beach (June 23, 1933, reabsorbed into Berkeley Township in 1965).[22] The township was named for John Berkeley, 1st Baron Berkeley of Stratton, one of the founders of the Province of New Jersey.[23]

Resort community of Pinewald[edit]

Army officer Lt. Edward Farrow began buying up woodland in the 1880s with the idea of building a retirement community for former Army and Navy officers. Farrow built a railroad station, shops and even a resort hotel called The Pines with the idea of attracting people. But only 11 people ever built houses in what Farrow called "Barnegat Park," and eventually he went bankrupt.[24]

In the 1920s, Benjamin W. Sangor purchased the area, intending to create a resort town catering to wealthy urban vacationers. Between 1928 and 1929, about 8,000 lots were sold in Pinewald, a "new-type, residential, recreational city-of-the sea-and-pines." It was to contain a golf course, recreation facilities, and estate homes.[25]

The developers immediately began construction of the Pinewald pavilion and pier at the end of Butler Avenue. The Royal Pines Hotel, a $1.175 million investment facing Crystal Lake, was built on the site of an earlier hotel dating back to the days of Barnegat Park.[26] It was the focal point of the new community. The hotel was also used as an asylum, then later a nursing home now known as the Crystal Lake Nursing & Rehabilitation Center.

The hotel was constructed by Russian architect W. Oltar-Jevsky in the early 1920s. Al Capone may have frequented its halls, perhaps even venturing beneath the lake in tunnels especially designed for smuggling alcohol during Prohibition. One newspaper article interviewed an unidentified man who claimed that "in the early 1930s the then Royal Pines Hotel was frequented by society's elite who, for $1.90 a drink, consumed prohibition liquor under the watchful eye of men who had guns strapped under their coats." In 1929, during the Great Depression, the resort community went bankrupt.

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 54.25 square miles (140.51 km2), including 42.72 square miles (110.64 km2) of land and 11.53 square miles (29.87 km2) of water (21.26%).[2][3]

The township is located in the central part of Ocean County along the Atlantic Ocean and Barnegat Bay, which is part of the Intracoastal Waterway.

Approximately 72% of the township's land area is within the federally designated New Jersey Pinelands National Reserve and 38% is within the State's Pineland Area, which is within the Pinelands National Reserve. Toms River Township forms the northern border of the township, Cedar Creek and Lacey Township form the southern border. The barrier island, on which South Seaside Park and Island Beach State Park are situated, is the township's eastern boundary.[27]

Holiday City-Berkeley (2010 Census population of 12,831[28]), Holiday City South (3,689 as of 2010[29]), Holiday Heights (2,099[30]) and Silver Ridge (1,133[31]) are unincorporated communities and census-designated places located within Berkeley Township.[32][33][34] The four CDPs are parts of Holiday City – Silver Ridge Park, an age-restricted adult planned community composed of separate communities, each with its own homeowners association and amenities.

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located wholly or partially within the township include Barnegat Park, Barnegat Pier, Bayville, Benders Corners, Berkeley Heights, Crossley, Double Trouble, Dover Forge, Glen Cove, Glenside Park, Good Luck Point, Holly Park, Manitou Park, Pelican Island, Pinewald, River Bank, Silver Ridge Park, Silver Ridge Park West, South Seaside Park, Stony Hill, Union Village and Zebs Bridge.[35]

The township borders the Ocean County communities of Barnegat Light, Beachwood, Island Heights, Lacey Township, Manchester Township, Ocean Township, Pine Beach, Seaside Heights, Seaside Park, South Toms River and Toms River Township; The township completely surrounds the borough of Ocean Gate.[27][36][37][38]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880683
189078615.1%
1900694*−11.7%
1910597−14.0%
1920576*−3.5%
1930811*40.8%
19401,12739.0%
19501,55037.5%
19604,272175.6%
19707,91885.3%
198023,151192.4%
199037,31961.2%
200039,9917.2%
201041,2553.2%
2019 (est.)42,036[14][39][40]1.9%
Population sources: 1880-2000[41]
1880-1920[42] 1880-1890[43]
1890-1910[44] 1910-1930[45]
1930-1990[46] 2000[47][48] 2010[11][12][13]
* = Lost territory in previous decade.[22]

Census 2010[edit]

The 2010 United States census counted 41,255 people, 20,349 households, and 11,538 families in the township. The population density was 962.5 per square mile (371.6/km2). There were 23,818 housing units at an average density of 555.7 per square mile (214.6/km2). The racial makeup was 94.85% (39,129) White, 1.75% (723) Black or African American, 0.11% (46) Native American, 1.13% (466) Asian, 0.01% (5) Pacific Islander, 1.13% (465) from other races, and 1.02% (421) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.92% (2,028) of the population.[11]

Of the 20,349 households, 12.2% had children under the age of 18; 45.8% were married couples living together; 8.0% had a female householder with no husband present and 43.3% were non-families. Of all households, 39.3% were made up of individuals and 30.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.00 and the average family size was 2.63.[11]

11.9% of the population were under the age of 18, 4.6% from 18 to 24, 15.3% from 25 to 44, 24.9% from 45 to 64, and 43.4% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 61.1 years. For every 100 females, the population had 81.5 males. For every 100 females ages 18 and older there were 78.6 males.[11]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $43,049 (with a margin of error of +/- $1,988) and the median family income was $58,230 (+/- $2,406). Males had a median income of $54,959 (+/- $3,373) versus $40,935 (+/- $2,531) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $28,168 (+/- $1,017). About 5.2% of families and 7.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 8.7% of those under age 18 and 7.8% of those age 65 or over.[49]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 39,991 people, 19,828 households, and 12,174 families residing in the township. The population density was 932.3 people per square mile (359.9/km2). There were 22,288 housing units at an average density of 519.6 per square mile (200.6/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 97.10% White, 1.30% African American, 0.04% Native American, 0.45% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.43% from other races, and 0.66% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.33% of the population.[47][48]

There were 19,828 households, out of which 11.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 53.1% were married couples living together, 6.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.6% were non-families. 35.9% of all households were made up of individuals, and 29.8% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.99 and the average family size was 2.52.[47][48]

In the township the population was spread out, with 11.4% under the age of 18, 3.6% from 18 to 24, 14.7% from 25 to 44, 18.3% from 45 to 64, and 52.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 66 years. For every 100 females, there were 79.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 77.1 males.[47][48]

The median income for a household in the township was $32,134, and the median income for a family was $40,208. Males had a median income of $41,643 versus $28,640 for females. The per capita income for the township was $22,198. About 3.4% of families and 5.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.1% of those under age 18 and 5.9% of those age 65 or over.[47][48]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Since July 1, 1983, Berkeley Township has been governed within the Faulkner Act, formally known as the Optional Municipal Charter Law, under the Mayor-Council system of municipal government plan D, as adopted based on direct petition.[50] The township is one of 71 municipalities (of the 565) statewide that use this form of government.[51] The governing body is comprised of the Mayor and the seven-member Township Council, which has three members elected at-large and one member elected from each of the four wards. The mayor and the members of the Township Council are elected to four-year terms of office on a partisan basis in staggered elections held as part of the November election in odd-numbered years, with the respective terms commencing on January 1; the mayor and the three at-large seats come up for election together every four years, with the four ward seats up for election two years later.[8]

As of 2020, the Mayor of Berkeley Township is Republican Carmen F. Amato Jr., whose term of office ends December 31, 2023. Members of the Berkeley Township Council are Council President John A. Bacchione (at-large; R, 2023), Council Vice President Sophia Gingrich (Ward 4; R, 2021), Keith A. Buscio (at-large; R, 2023), James J. Byrnes (Ward 1; R, 2021), L. Thomas Grosse Jr. (at-large; R, 2023), Angelo Guadagno (Ward 2; R, 2021) and Judith L. Noonan (Ward 3; R, 2021).[4][52][53][54][55][56]

In January 2015, the Township Council selected Anthony DePaola from among three candidates recommended by the municipal Republican committee to fill the at-large seat that expiring in 2015 that had been held by Robert G. Ray, who had resigned earlier that month.[57]

In November 2012, James J. Byrnes and Kevin M. Askew won the remaining 14 months on unexpired terms of office. Byrnes had been appointed to the Ward 1 seat to fill the vacancy of Karen Davis following her resignation from office, while Askew had been appointed to fill the vacancy of Carmen F. Amato Jr. in Ward 2 after he had taken office as the township's mayor.[58]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Berkeley Township is located in the 3rd Congressional District[59] and is part of New Jersey's 9th state legislative district.[12][60][61]

For the 117th United States Congress, New Jersey's 3rd Congressional District is represented by Andy Kim (D, Bordentown).[62] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Democrats Cory Booker (Newark, term ends 2027)[63] and Bob Menendez (Harrison, term ends 2025).[64][65]

For the 2018–2019 session (Senate, General Assembly), the 9th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Christopher J. Connors (R, Lacey Township) and in the General Assembly by DiAnne Gove (R, Long Beach Township) and Brian E. Rumpf (R, Little Egg Harbor Township).[66][67]

Ocean County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders consisting of five members, elected on an at-large basis in partisan elections and serving staggered three-year terms of office, with either one or two seats coming up for election each year as part of the November general election.[68] At an annual reorganization held in the beginning of January, the board chooses a Director and a Deputy Director from among its members. As of 2019, Ocean County's Freeholders (with party affiliation, term-end year, residence and department directorship listed in parentheses) are Freeholder Director Virginia E. Haines (R, 2019, Toms River; Parks and Recreation and Natural Lands),[69] Freeholder Deputy Director John P. Kelly (R, 2019, Eagleswood Township; Law and Public Safety),[70] Gerry P. Little (R, 2021, Surf City; Roads),[71] Gary Quinn (R, 2021, Lacey Township; Human Services and Transportation)[72] and Joseph H. Vicari (R, 2020, Toms River; Senior Services and County Operations).[73][74][75] Constitutional officers elected on a countywide basis are County Clerk Scott M. Colabella (R, 2019, Barnegat Light),[76][77] Sheriff Michael Mastronardy (R, 2019; Toms River)[78] and Surrogate Jeffrey Moran (R, 2023, Beachwood).[79][80]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 30,403 registered voters in Berkeley Township, of which 8,348 (27.5%) were registered as Democrats, 7,946 (26.1%) were registered as Republicans and 14,095 (46.4%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 14 voters registered to other parties.[81] Among the township's 2010 Census population, 73.7% (vs. 63.2% in Ocean County) were registered to vote, including 83.6% of those ages 18 and over (vs. 82.6% countywide).[81][82]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 56.5% of the vote (11,858 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 42.5% (8,931 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (202 votes), among the 21,208 ballots cast by the township's 31,431 registered voters (217 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 67.5%.[83][84] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 57.3% of the vote (13,617 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 40.3% (9,564 votes) and other candidates with 1.2% (295 votes), among the 23,761 ballots cast by the township's 32,340 registered voters, for a turnout of 73.5%.[85] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 54.5% of the vote (12,862 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 44.3% (10,442 votes) and other candidates with 0.6% (201 votes), among the 23,593 ballots cast by the township's 31,675 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.5.[86]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 77.5% of the vote (11,301 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 21.3% (3,102 votes), and other candidates with 1.2% (181 votes), among the 14,992 ballots cast by the township's 31,059 registered voters (408 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 48.3%.[87][88] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 62.3% of the vote (11,112 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 30.6% (5,464 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 4.5% (811 votes) and other candidates with 1.0% (175 votes), among the 17,838 ballots cast by the township's 31,397 registered voters, yielding a 56.8% turnout.[89]

Education[edit]

The Berkeley Township School District serves public school students in pre-kindergarten through sixth grade.[90] As of the 2017–18 school year, the district, comprised of four schools, had an enrollment of 2,158 students and 174.5 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.4:1.[91] Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[92]) are Bayville Elementary School[93] (403 students; in grades PreK-4), H. & M. Potter Elementary School[94] (544; PreK-4), Clara B. Worth Elementary School[95] (557; PreK-4) and Berkeley Township Elementary School[96] (649; 5-6).[97]

Students in public school for seventh through twelfth grades attend the schools of the Central Regional School District, which serves students from the municipalities of Berkeley Township, Island Heights, Ocean Gate, Seaside Heights and Seaside Park.[98] Schools in the district (with 2017-18 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[99]) are Central Regional Middle School[100] for grades 7 and 8 (761 students) and Central Regional High School[101] for grades 9 - 12 (1,401 students).[102][103] The district's Board of Education consists of nine members, who are directly elected by the residents of the constituent municipalities to three-year terms of office on a staggered basis, with three seats up for election each year.[104] Seats on the high school district's board of education are allocated based on the population of the constituent municipalities, with Berkeley Township allocated five of the board's nine seats.[105]

Media[edit]

The Asbury Park Press provides daily news coverage of the township, as does WOBM-FM radio. The township provides material and commentary to The Berkeley Times, which also covers news from Beachwood, Ocean Gate, Pine Beach and South Toms River as one of seven weekly papers from Micromedia Publications.[106]

Transportation[edit]

The northbound Garden State Parkway in Berkeley Township

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 266.02 miles (428.12 km) of roadways, of which 220.88 miles (355.47 km) were maintained by the municipality, 36.64 miles (58.97 km) by The Ocean County Road Dept., 6.27 miles (10.09 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation and 2.23 miles (3.59 km) by the New Jersey Turnpike Authority.[107]

The Garden State Parkway is the primary access route, with two exits, exit 77 and exit 80 serving the township. U.S. Route 9 runs through the eastern-middle part of the municipality while Route 35 passes through briefly and ends at the park road for Island Beach State Park. A small section of Route 37 also passes through Berkeley Township, near its junction with Route 35.

Public transportation[edit]

NJ Transit offers local bus service between the township and Atlantic City on the 559 route.[108][109]

Ocean Ride service is provided on routes OC1, OC2, OC7 and OC8.[110]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Berkeley Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Home page Archived 2012-11-26 at the Wayback Machine, Berkeley Township. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  2. ^ a b c d e f 2019 Census Gazetteer Files: New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 1, 2020.
  3. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  4. ^ a b Council Members, Berkeley Township. Accessed March 19, 2020. "Under the optional Municipal Charter Law (Faulkner Act) effective July 1, 1983, the Township is governed by a Mayor who is elected for a four year term and a seven member Council, elected on a staggered basis for terms of four years, with the respective terms commencing on January 1st."
  5. ^ 2020 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  6. ^ Business Administrator, Berkeley Township. Accessed March 19, 2020.
  7. ^ Clerk's Office, Berkeley Township. Accessed March 19, 2020.
  8. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 49.
  9. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Berkeley, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 4, 2013.
  10. ^ Census 2010:Ocean County, Asbury Park Press. Accessed June 4, 2011.
  11. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Berkeley township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  12. ^ a b c d Municipalities Sorted by 2011-2020 Legislative District, New Jersey Department of State. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  13. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Berkeley township Archived 2018-03-16 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  14. ^ a b QuickFacts for Berkeley township, Ocean County, New Jersey; Ocean County, New Jersey; New Jersey from Population estimates, July 1, 2019, (V2019), United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  15. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 11, 2012.
  16. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Bayville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Bayville, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  18. ^ a b U.S. Census website , United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ Geographic Codes Lookup for New Jersey Archived June 4, 2019, at the Wayback Machine, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  20. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  21. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010 Archived August 7, 2017, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  22. ^ a b Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 201. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  23. ^ Hutchinson, Viola L. The Origin of New Jersey Place Names, New Jersey Public Library Commission, May 1945. Accessed August 27, 2015.
  24. ^ Moore, Kirk. "Grand plans for 'Pinewald-On-The-Bay' died in the Depression", Asbury Park Press, March 30, 2008. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  25. ^ Schweiger, Tristan J. "Berkeley has had many names", Asbury Park Press, February 8, 2007. Accessed May 14, 2013.
  26. ^ Resort Development in the Twentieth Century, An Historic Theme Study of the, National Park Service. Accessed October 14, 2007.
  27. ^ a b Town Center Redevelopment Plan Archived 2016-12-02 at the Wayback Machine, Berkeley Township, June 10, 2009. Accessed October 31, 2016. "Berkeley shares its municipal border with Seaside Park Borough on the Barrier Island; Ocean Gate Borough, Pine Beach Borough, Beachwood Borough, South Toms River Borough and Toms River Township to the north; Manchester Township to the west in the Pinelands; and Lacey Township to the south. Berkeley technically shares a border with a two other municipalities – Island Heights and Seaside Heights. Both borders are considered inconsequential due to the fact that Island Heights is separated from Berkeley by the Toms River, and the Seaside Heights border adjoins Pelican Island, a small bay island separated from the Berkeley mainland by Barnegat Bay."
  28. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Holiday City-Berkeley CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  29. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Holiday City South CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  30. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Holiday Heights CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  31. ^ DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 Demographic Profile Data for Silver Ridge CDP, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  32. ^ GCT-PH1 - Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - County -- County Subdivision and Place from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  33. ^ 2006-2010 American Community Survey Geography for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  34. ^ New Jersey: 2010 - Population and Housing Unit Counts - 2010 Census of Population and Housing (CPH-2-32), United States Census Bureau, August 2012. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  35. ^ Locality Search, State of New Jersey. Accessed November 29, 2014.
  36. ^ Areas touching Berkeley Township, MapIt. Accessed March 19, 2020.
  37. ^ Ocean County Map, Coalition for a Healthy NJ. Accessed March 19, 2020.
  38. ^ New Jersey Municipal Boundaries, New Jersey Department of Transportation. Accessed November 15, 2019.
  39. ^ Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Minor Civil Divisions in New Jersey: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  40. ^ Census Estimates for New Jersey April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2019, United States Census Bureau. Accessed May 21, 2020.
  41. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Ocean County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  42. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed August 26, 2013.
  43. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 99. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  44. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 338. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  45. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States : 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 718. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  46. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990 Archived May 10, 2015, at the Wayback Machine, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network. Accessed June 28, 2015.
  47. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Berkeley township, New Jersey[permanent dead link], United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  48. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Berkeley township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  49. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Berkeley township, Ocean County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 13, 2012.
  50. ^ "The Faulkner Act: New Jersey's Optional Municipal Charter Law" Archived October 12, 2013, at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey State League of Municipalities, July 2007. Accessed September 23, 2013.
  51. ^ Inventory of Municipal Forms of Government in New Jersey, Rutgers University Center for Government Studies, July 1, 2011. Accessed November 18, 2019.
  52. ^ 2019 Municipal User Friendly Budget, Berkeley Township. Accessed March 19, 2020.
  53. ^ 2020 Ocean County & Municipal Elected Officials, Ocean County, New Jersey Clerk, updated February 6, 2020. Accessed March 18, 2020.
  54. ^ Township of Berkeley, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed March 18, 2020.
  55. ^ 2019 General Election Official Results November 5, 2019, Ocean County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 15, 2019. Accessed January 1, 2020.
  56. ^ 2017 General Election Official Results November 7, 2017, Ocean County, New Jersey Clerk, updated November 15, 2017. Accessed January 1, 2018.
  57. ^ Miller, Patricia A. "Township Council Taps Anthony DePaola To Replace Robert G. RayDePaola was sworn in at Jan. 12 meeting in Town Hall.", Berkeley Patch, January 12, 2015. Accessed January 14, 2015. "Anthony DePaola - who holds a number of positions in Berkeley Township - was sworn into the Township Council as a councilman-at-large to replace Robert G. Ray, who resigned earlier this month."
  58. ^ Miller, Patricia A. "Byrnes And Askew Coast To Easy Wins In Township Council Races; Both win one-year unexpired terms on the governing body", BerkeleyPatch, November 7, 2012. Accessed August 26, 2013. "Byrnes - the former longtime president of the Berkeley Board of Education - was appointed to the Township Council Ward 1 seat in January, to replace Karen Davis, who resigned because of health reasons. Askew was also appointed to the Ward 2 seat in January, to replace Carmen F. Amato Jr., who was elected mayor in November 2011."
  59. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed February 1, 2020.
  60. ^ 2019 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed October 30, 2019.
  61. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  62. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 3, 2019.
  63. ^ [1], United States Senate. Accessed April 30, 2021. "He now owns a home and lives in Newark's Central Ward community."
  64. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate, January 26, 2015. "Menendez, who started his political career in Union City, moved in September from Paramus to one of Harrison's new apartment buildings near the town's PATH station.."
  65. ^ [2]. United States Senate. Accessed April 30, 2021. "Booker, Cory A. - (D - NJ) Class II; Menendez, Robert - (D - NJ) Class I"
  66. ^ Legislative Roster 2018-2019 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 22, 2018.
  67. ^ District 9 Legislators, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 22, 2018.
  68. ^ Freeholder History, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  69. ^ Freeholder Director Virginia E. Haines, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 4, 2019.
  70. ^ Freeholder John P. Kelly, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  71. ^ Freeholder Gerry P. Little, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  72. ^ Freeholder Gary Quinn, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 4, 2019.
  73. ^ Freeholder Joseph H. Vicari, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  74. ^ Board of Chosen Freeholders, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  75. ^ County Directory, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  76. ^ County Clerk, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  77. ^ Biography of Scott M. Colabella, Office of the County Clerk. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  78. ^ Sheriff Michael Mastronardy, Ocean County Sheriff's Office. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  79. ^ County Surrogate Jeffrey W. Moran, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  80. ^ 2015 Elected Officials of Ocean County, Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed January 25, 2015.
  81. ^ a b Voter Registration Summary - Ocean, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  82. ^ GCT-P7: Selected Age Groups: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision; 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey , United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  83. ^ "Presidential General Election Results - November 6, 2012 - Ocean County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  84. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 6, 2012 - General Election Results - Ocean County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. March 15, 2013. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  85. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  86. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Ocean County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  87. ^ "Governor - Ocean County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  88. ^ "Number of Registered Voters and Ballots Cast - November 5, 2013 - General Election Results - Ocean County" (PDF). New Jersey Department of Elections. January 29, 2014. Retrieved December 24, 2014.
  89. ^ 2009 Governor: Ocean County Archived 2012-10-17 at the Wayback Machine, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed December 25, 2012.
  90. ^ Berkeley Township Board of Education District Policy 0110 - Identification, Berkeley Township School District. Accessed March 19, 2020. "Purpose: The Board of Education exists for the purpose of providing a thorough and efficient system of free public education in grades Pre-Kindergarten through six in the Berkeley Township School District. Composition: The Berkeley Township School District is comprised of all the area within the municipal boundaries of Berkeley Township."
  91. ^ District information for Berkeley Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  92. ^ School Data for the Berkeley Township Elementary Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  93. ^ Bayville Elementary School, Berkeley Township School District. Accessed January 21, 2020.
  94. ^ H. & M. Potter Elementary School, Berkeley Township School District. Accessed January 21, 2020.
  95. ^ Clara B. Worth Elementary School, Berkeley Township School District. Accessed January 21, 2020.
  96. ^ Berkeley Township Elementary School, Berkeley Township School District. Accessed January 21, 2020.
  97. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Berkeley Township School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  98. ^ Central Regional School District 2016 School Report Card Narrative, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed July 14, 2017. "The Central Regional School District is located in the Bayville section of Berkeley Township and draws from the constituent districts of Berkeley Township, Island Heights, Ocean Gate, Seaside Heights, and Seaside Park."
  99. ^ School Data for the Central Regional School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed November 1, 2019.
  100. ^ Central Regional Middle School, Central Regional School District. Accessed January 21, 2020.
  101. ^ Central Regional High School, Central Regional School District. Accessed January 21, 2020.
  102. ^ Our Schools, Central Regional School District. Accessed January 21, 2020.
  103. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Central Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed December 29, 2016.
  104. ^ Comprehensive Annual Financial Report for the Central Regional School District, New Jersey Department of Education, June 30, 2018. Accessed January 21, 2020. "The School District is a Type II district located in the County of Ocean, State of New Jersey. As a Type II district, the School District functions independently through a Board of Education. The Board is comprised of nine members appointed to three-year terms. These terms are staggered so that three members’ terms expire each year."
  105. ^ Board Members, Central Regional School District. Accessed January 21, 2020.
  106. ^ The Berkeley Times Archived 2016-08-06 at the Wayback Machine, Micromedia Publications. Accessed July 26, 2016. "First published in 1996. Serving Berkeley, Beachwood, Pine Beach, Ocean Gate and South Toms River in Ocean County, New Jersey"
  107. ^ Ocean County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  108. ^ Ocean County Bus / Rail Connections, NJ Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of July 26, 2010. Accessed August 9, 2012.
  109. ^ Ocean County Transit Guide[permanent dead link], Ocean County, New Jersey. Accessed June 26, 2015.
  110. ^ Ocean County Bus Service, Greater Mercer TMA. Accessed March 19, 2020.
  111. ^ Bakan, Josh. "National Bullying Prevention Month Comes To Berkeley, CR Schools", Berkeley, NJ, Patch, October 10, 2019. Accessed July 16, 2020. "Tom DeBlass, a Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu practitioner from Berkeley, is giving a sportsmanship presentation to Central Regional's fall sports teams."
  112. ^ Wall, Karen. "All That Jazzy: Berkeley Gymnast Wins National Championship; Jazmyn Foberg, 14, earns all-around title at U.S. Junior National Championships", Berkeley Patch, August 23, 2014. Accessed October 12, 2015. "Berkeley gymnast Jazmyn Foberg is the new junior national gymnastics all-around champion."
  113. ^ YES Announcers: Al Leiter, New York Yankees analyst, YES Network. Accessed January 25, 2015. "Leiter is a native of Bayville, N.J."
  114. ^ "Coach", Daily Record (Morristown), December 13, 1988. Accessed September 15, 2020, via Newspapers.com. "Longo, 30, was born in the Jersey Shore community of Red Bank and grew up in Bayville, where he attended Central Regional High."
  115. ^ Ervolino, Bill. "Jessica's a step behind her author", The Record, September 9, 2007. "Like her heroine, McCafferty knows her way around the Garden State, having grown up in Bayville before moving to Brooklyn and Manhattan and then getting married and settling in -- ahem -- Princeton."
  116. ^ Private Herbert Irving Preston, USMC Archived 2015-09-23 at the Wayback Machine, United States Marine Corps History Division. Accessed January 25, 2015. "Born: 6 August 1876 or 1878 in Berkeley, New Jersey"

External links[edit]