Bermuda Run, North Carolina

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Bermuda Run, North Carolina
Town
Bermuda Run is located in North Carolina
Bermuda Run
Bermuda Run
Bermuda Run is located in the US
Bermuda Run
Bermuda Run
Location within the state of North Carolina
Coordinates: 35°59′55″N 80°25′53″W / 35.99861°N 80.43139°W / 35.99861; -80.43139Coordinates: 35°59′55″N 80°25′53″W / 35.99861°N 80.43139°W / 35.99861; -80.43139
Country United States
State North Carolina
County Davie
Area
 • Total 1.71 sq mi (4.42 km2)
 • Land 1.65 sq mi (4.28 km2)
 • Water 0.05 sq mi (0.13 km2)
Elevation 794 ft (242 m)
Population (2010)
 • Total 1,725
 • Density 1,043/sq mi (402.7/km2)
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) EDT (UTC-4)
ZIP code 27006
Area code(s) 336
FIPS code 37-05135[1]
GNIS feature ID 1848621[2]
Website www.townofbr.com

Bermuda Run is a town in Davie County, North Carolina, United States. The population was 1,725 at the 2010 census.[3] It was incorporated in 1999 as a fully gated residential community near country clubs and golf courses like the Bermuda Run Country Club, Oak Valley Golf Club, and Tanglewood Park. In 2000, the town annexed into neighboring Hillsdale, picking up a commercial district. The town rests on the western bank of the Yadkin River along U.S. Route 158 and North Carolina Highway 801. Interstate 40 provides express access to Winston-Salem, the town's nearest urban center. In 2012 Kinderton Village was voluntarily annexed by the town of Bermuda Run.

History[edit]

The English colony (now designated a British Overseas Territory) of Bermuda, or the Somers Isles, was settled in 1609 by the survivors of the Virginia Company's flagship, the Sea Venture. The Royal Charter of the company and the boundaries of Virginia were extended in 1612 to include Bermuda, although administration of the archipelago was transferred to a new company with the same shareholders, the Somers Isles Company, in 1615, which controlled Bermuda until 1684. Whereas the Virginia colony struggled to survive, Bermuda quickly became thriving and populous. Its limited land mass, however, meant there were few prospects for many members of its rapidly multiplying working class, and roughly 10,000 Bermudians would emigrate during the 17th and 18th Centuries, primarily to Virginia, the Carolinas, and Georgia. This included the establishment of the city of Charleston and the colony of South Carolina under William Sayle in 1670. One result of this exodus is the appearance of the name Bermuda in many locations in the American South where Bermudians settled, from Bermuda Hundred, VA to Bermuda Island, in the Albemarle Sound, North Carolina. The name Bermuda Run was also previously used for areas of what are now Colonial Heights and Hopewell in Virginia.

Win-Mock Farm Dairy was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 2010.[4]

Geography[edit]

Bermuda Run is located in northeastern Davie County at 35°59′55″N 80°25′53″W / 35.99861°N 80.43139°W / 35.99861; -80.43139 (35.998557, -80.431377).[5] It is bordered to the northeast, across the Yadkin River, by the village of Clemmons in Forsyth County. Interstate 40 accesses the town from Exit 180 and leads northeast 13 miles (21 km) to Winston-Salem and southwest 31 miles (50 km) to Statesville. Mocksville, the Davie County seat, is 11 miles (18 km) to the southwest via US 158.

According to the United States Census Bureau, the town of Bermuda Run has a total area of 1.7 square miles (4.4 km2), of which 1.7 square miles (4.3 km2) is land and 0.04 square miles (0.1 km2), or 3.05%, is water.[3]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
2000 1,431
2010 1,725 20.5%
Est. 2015 2,561 [6] 48.5%
U.S. Decennial Census[7]

As of the census[1] of 2000, there were 1,431 people, 734 households, and 497 families residing in the town. The population density was 1,087.6 people per square mile (418.6/km²). There were 828 housing units at an average density of 629.3/sq mi (242.2/km²). The racial makeup of the town was 98.95% White, 0.49% African American, 0.07% Native American, 0.07% Pacific Islander, and 0.42% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 1.82% of the population.

There were 734 households out of which 10.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 64.4% were married couples living together, 2.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 32.2% were non-families. 30.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 20.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.93 and the average family size was 2.32.

In the town, the population was spread out with 9.6% under the age of 18, 1.9% from 18 to 24, 11.9% from 25 to 44, 35.5% from 45 to 64, and 41.0% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 60 years. For every 100 females there were 86.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.5 males.

The median income for a household in the town was $84,187, and the median income for a family was $100,727. Males had a median income of $100,000 versus $27,350 for females. The per capita income for the town was $47,765. None of the families and 1.4% of the population were living below the poverty line, including no under eighteens and 1.2% of those over 64.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 2013-09-11. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  2. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  3. ^ a b "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Bermuda Run town, North Carolina". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Retrieved November 25, 2015. 
  4. ^ "National Register of Historic Places Listings". Weekly List of Actions Taken on Properties: 12/27/10 through 12/30/10. National Park Service. 2011-01-07. 
  5. ^ "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  6. ^ "Annual Estimates of the Resident Population for Incorporated Places: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2015". Retrieved July 2, 2016. 
  7. ^ "Census of Population and Housing". Census.gov. Archived from the original on April 22, 2013. Retrieved June 4, 2015. 

External links[edit]