BernzOmatic

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Bernzomatic brand logo

BernzOmatic is an American manufacturing company. It was founded by Otto Bernz (May 21, 1856 – February 17, 1932) in 1876[1][2] in Newark, New Jersey as Otto Bernz Co..[2] The company manufactures handheld torches and accessories, especially gas burner torches using fuel cylinders containing butane, propane, MAPP gas, and oxygen for soldering, brazing, and welding. Its trademark torch packs include Basic Use, Multi-Application, and Specialty. Its products include torches, fuel cylinders, kits, solders and accessories, and utility lighters.

In the 1940s Otto Bernz Co. relocated to Rochester, New York and changed its name to BernzOmatic.[2] In 1982, BernzOmatic became a division of Newell (now Newell Rubbermaid).[3]

On July 1, 2011, Worthington Cylinders division of Worthington Industries purchased BernzOmatic for $51million.[4]

In 2014, BernzOmatic's manufacturing facility in Medina, New York was consolidated with a location in Chilton, Wisconsin.[5]

BernzOmatic, now a Worthington entity, continues to manufacture handheld propane and propylene ("Map-pro") cylinders, but unfortunately these products have been plagued with defects that have caused severe burn injuries and deaths, and continue to be the subject matter of lawsuits nationally as well as internationally. The cylinders often fail at the "neck" just below the threads to which the torch attachments are mounted, but sometimes fail on the cylinder body itself. Details of the defects any of the lawsuits are published at:

http://www.torchinjuries.com/index.html

http://www.torchinjuries.com/lawsuits.html

Injuries and instances of product defects and failures may be reported through http://www.torchinjuries.com/contact.html and to the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission at 800-638-2772 or www.SaferProducts.gov (reference number 20180519-A9E35-2147387862).

References[edit]

  1. ^ American Stock Exchange Investor. p. 12. Retrieved 2008-11-10.
  2. ^ a b c "Carrying the Torch". BernzOmatic. Retrieved October 17, 2016.
  3. ^ "Boring Portfolio Report". The Motley Fool. December 29, 1997. Retrieved 2008-11-10.
  4. ^ [1][dead link]
  5. ^ [2][permanent dead link]

External links[edit]