Best Sports Movie ESPY Award

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Best Sports Movie ESPY Award
Awarded for best sports film
Location Los Angeles (2011)
Presented by ESPN
First awarded 2002
Last awarded 2011
Currently held by The Fighter (USA)
Website www.espn.co.uk/espys/

The Best Sports Movie ESPY Award was an annual award honoring the achievements of an individual from the world of sports film making. It was first awarded as part of the ESPY Awards in 2002, and was discontinued nine years later.[1] The Best Sports Movie ESPY Award trophy, designed by sculptor Lawrence Nowlan,[2] was bestowed annually to the sports film adjudged to be the best in a given calendar year.[1] From 2004 onward, the winner was chosen by online voting through choices selected by the ESPN Select Nominating Committee.[3] Before that, determination of the winners was made by an panel of experts.[4] Through the 2001 iteration of the ESPY Awards, ceremonies were conducted in February of each year to honor achievements over the previous calendar year; awards presented thereafter are conferred in July and reflect performance from the June previous.[a][5]

The inaugural winner of the Best Sports Movie ESPY Award in 2002 was the baseball themed film The Rookie released the same year. It is based on the true story of Jim Morris' minor but notable Major League Baseball career.[6] Films that predominantly feature American football have received the award more than any other sport, with three wins and six further nominations, followed by baseball and basketball with two victories apiece, and were nominated twice. John Lee Hancock is the director who holds more victories than any one else, one for The Rookie, and a second for The Blind Side (2010).[7] The two sports with the most nominations that did not win the award are golf and horse racing, with three each.[7][8] The final winner of the Best Sports Movie ESPY Award in 2011 was the Boxing film The Fighter, which centers on the lives of former professional boxers Micky Ward and Dicky Eklund, and the issues they are confronted with in both their personal and professional lives.[9][10]

List of winners[edit]

Gurinder Chadha's film Bend It Like Beckham was the only soccer film to win the award in 2003.
In 2011, The Fighter, directed by David O. Russell, was the final film to be voted the winner of the award.
Year Film Director Sport featured Nominees Refs
2002 The Rookie Hancock, John LeeJohn Lee Hancock Baseball 61*Baseball
AliBoxing
Joe and MaxBoxing
Monday Night MayhemAmerican football
[6][7]
2003 Bend It Like Beckham Chadha, GurinderGurinder Chadha Association football (soccer) A Gentleman's GameGolf
Like MikeBasketball
Poolhall JunkiesPool
The Junction BoysCollege football
[7][11]
2004 Miracle O'Connor, GavinGavin O'Connor Ice hockey Bobby Jones: Stroke of GeniusGolf
DodgeBall: A True Underdog StoryDodgeball
RadioAmerican football
SeabiscuitHorse racing
[7][12]
2005 Friday Night Lights Berg, PeterPeter Berg American football Cinderella ManBoxing
Coach CarterBasketball
Million Dollar BabyBoxing
[13][14]
2006 Glory Road Gartner, JamesJames Gartner Basketball DreamerHorse racing
Four MinutesTrack and field
The Greatest Game Ever PlayedGolf
[7][15]
2007 Talladega Nights: The Ballad of Ricky Bobby McKay, AdamAdam McKay Stock car racing Invincible   American football
PrideSwimming
We Are MarshallAmerican football
[7][16]
2008 Semi-Pro Alterman, KentKent Alterman Basketball The Game PlanAmerican football
LeatherheadsAmerican football
Resurrecting the ChampBoxing
[17][18]
2009 The Express: The Ernie Davis Story Fleder, GaryGary Fleder American football SugarBaseball
The WrestlerPro Wrestling
[7][19]
2010 The Blind Side Hancock, John LeeJohn Lee Hancock American football Big FanBaseball
The Damned UnitedSoccer
InvictusRugby union
The Karate KidMartial arts
[20][21]
2011 The Fighter O. Russell, DavidDavid O. Russell Boxing SecretariatHorse racing
Soul SurferSurfing
Win WinWrestling
[8][9]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Because of the rescheduling of the ESPY Awards ceremony, the award presented in 2002 was given in consideration of performance betwixt February 2001 and June 2002.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b R. Nelson, Murry (2013). American Sports: A History of Icons, Idols and Ideas. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. pp. 399–401. ISBN 0-313-39753-8. Retrieved June 24, 2015. 
  2. ^ Avard, Christian (August 2, 2013). "Sculptor commissioned to complete Joe Frazier statue has died". Barre Montpelier Times Argus. Archived from the original on February 21, 2014. Retrieved January 21, 2018. 
  3. ^ "The 2004 ESPY Awards – Fans to decide all 2004 ESPY Award winners". ESPN. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved 23 January 2018. 
  4. ^ "Committee is newly found". ESPN. February 3, 1999. Archived from the original on January 23, 2018. Retrieved 23 January 2018. 
  5. ^ a b "New categories unveiled for The 2002 ESPY Awards" (Press release). ESPN. 2002. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved December 20, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b "To The Movies! – Summer 2002". Western Michigan University. 2002. Archived from the original on March 12, 2015. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Edgington, K.; Erskine, Thomas; Welsh, James M. (December 29, 2010). Encyclopedia of Sports Films. Lanham, Maryland: Scarecrow Press. p. 517. ISBN 978-0-8108-7653-8. Archived from the original on January 6, 2018. 
  8. ^ a b Langford, Richard (June 26, 2011). "2011 ESPN ESPY Awards: Nominees and TV Schedule". Bleacher Report. Archived from the original on January 5, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  9. ^ a b Pepin, Matt (July 13, 2011). "Bruins' Tim Thomas wins two ESPY awards". The Boston Globe. Archived from the original on January 6, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  10. ^ Rose, Steve (February 2, 2011). "The Fighter tells the story of the real-life Rocky". The Guardian. Archived from the original on January 5, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  11. ^ "The ESPY Awards 2003 nominees". ESPN. 2003. Archived from the original on January 5, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  12. ^ "Manning, Pappas Win ESPY Awards". University of Tennessee Athletics. July 15, 2004. Archived from the original on January 5, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  13. ^ "Billy Bob's Filmography – Friday Light Nights (2004)". BillyBobThornton.net. Archived from the original on May 9, 2016. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  14. ^ "Cast your ESPY vote: Best Sports Movie". ESPN. 2005. Archived from the original on January 7, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  15. ^ Limon, Lliana (September 22, 2006). "UTEP still riding the 'Glory Road'". The Albuquerque Tribune. p. 6. Retrieved January 5, 2018 – via Infotrac Newsstand. (Subscription required (help)). 
  16. ^ "Gordon Talladega Nights Win Espys". Motor Racing Network. July 12, 2007. Archived from the original on December 22, 2017. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  17. ^ Bailey, W. Scott (July 27, 2008). "Trinity Tigers are the latest victim of ESPN's S.A. snub". San Antonio Business Journal. Archived from the original on August 7, 2012. Retrieved January 5, 2018. (Subscription required (help)). 
  18. ^ Thomson, Gus (July 3, 2008). "Media Life:ESPY nomination for Auburn's Bassmaster champ Skeet Reese". Auburn Journal. Archived from the original on January 5, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  19. ^ "'The Express' wins ESPY award for Best Sports Movie". The Post-Standard. July 16, 2009. Archived from the original on January 6, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 
  20. ^ Auldo, T. J. (July 15, 2010). "'The Blind Side' wins ESPY's best sports film". The Daily News. Archived from the original on January 5, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. (Subscription required (help)). 
  21. ^ "Lakers nominated for 'Best Team' Espy Award". San Gabriel Valley Tribune. June 24, 2010. Archived from the original on January 6, 2018. Retrieved January 5, 2018. 

External links[edit]