Beth Fukumoto

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Beth Fukumoto
Rep. Beth Fukumoto.jpg
Minority Leader of the Hawaii House of Representatives
In office
December 31, 2014 – February 1, 2017
Preceded by Aaron Ling Johanson
Succeeded by Andria Tupola
Member of the Hawaii House of Representatives
from the 36th district
Assumed office
January 16, 2013
Preceded by Roy Takumi
Personal details
Born (1983-03-30) March 30, 1983 (age 34)[1]
Honolulu, Hawaii, U.S.
Nationality American
Political party Democratic (2017–present)
Other political
affiliations
Residence Mililani, Hawaii
Alma mater Georgetown University
University of Hawaii at Manoa
Website Campaign Website

Beth Fukumoto[2] (born March 30, 1983) is an American politician and a member of the Hawaii House of Representatives since January 16, 2013, representing District 36.[3]

In March 2017, she announced plans to change her party identification from Republican to Democrat citing concerns about racism and sexism.[4] Fukumoto remained an independent until approval of her request to join the Democratic Party on June 19, 2017.[5][6]

Education[edit]

Fukumoto graduated with honors from the University of Hawaii at Manoa with a B.A. in American Studies with a minor in Sociology. She later received a M.A. in English from Georgetown University.[7]

Hawaii House of Representatives[edit]

Fukumoto was first elected to the state House of Representatives in 2012 and is the youngest person to serve as the House Minority Leader. She is also the youngest person to serve as the House Minority Floor Leader and the Director of Research for the House Minority.

Fukumoto represents District 36, Mililani, Mililani Mauka, and Waipio Acres, the district in which she grew up..

In 2013, Fukumoto was awarded the James Madison Fellowship by the Millennial Action Project for her demonstrated success in transcending partisan lines. The Daily Beast named Fukumoto one of "Nine Women Remaking the Right."[8] Fukumoto was also named by The Washington Post as a Top 40 under 40 Rising Political Star.[9]

Recently, she was awarded the Aspen-Rodel Fellowship for demonstrating an outstanding ability to work responsibly across partisan divisions.[10]

Elections[edit]

  • In 2016, Fukumoto was re-elected to represent District 36 by winning the general election, 6,792 votes (66.7%) against Democratic nominee, Marilyn B. Lee with 3,274 votes (31.7%For Results, Click HERE.).
  • In 2014, Fukumoto won District 36 primary election with 1,319 votes [11] and won the November 4, 2014, general election with 5,880 votes (64.5%) against Democratic nominee, Marilyn B. Lee with 3,034 votes (33.3%)For Results-Click HERE
  • In 2012, Fukumoto won the general election with 5,334 votes (51.2%) against incumbent Democratic Representative Marilyn Lee,[12] who had been redistricted from District 38.
  • In 2010, Fukumoto ran unopposed in the September 18, 2010, Republican primary for District 37,[13] but lost the November 2, 2010, general election to incumbent Representative Ryan Yamane.[14]

Tenure[edit]

Fukumoto served as House Minority Leader until 2017, when she was voted out after attending a Women's March event in Hawaii.[15]

In early 2017, Fukumoto announced openness to leaving the Republican Party and potentially seeking membership in the Democratic Party.

In her statement, she noted her disapproval of President Donald Trump's behavior and attitude towards women and minorities and her recent estrangement from the Republican Party:

"In the last couple years, I’ve watched leaders in the Republican Party become less and less tolerant of diverse opinions and dissenting voices. Today, I’m facing demands for my resignation from leadership and possible censure because I raised concerns about our President’s treatment of women and minorities. I’ve been asked by both my party and my caucus to commit to not criticizing the president for the remainder of his term and to take a more partisan approach to working in the Legislature. That is not a commitment I can make. As a representative of my community, it is my job to hold leaders accountable and to work with anyone, regardless of party, to make Hawaii a better place for our families. This morning, I sent a letter to my district explaining that I would like to leave the Republican Party and seek membership in the Democratic Party. When I was re-elected in November, I was elected as a Republican, and I want to honor my community’s choice by consulting them before any decision is made. As I articulated in my letter, I encourage my constituents to contact me with input and provide feedback. I was elected by the people of Mililani, and I am here to represent them."[16]

On March 22, 2017, Fukumoto released a statement indicating her plans to resign from the Republican Party and seek membership in the Democratic Party. She cited Republican partisanship and overlaps with the Democratic party platform as factors in making this decision.[17] Seeking feedback from her constituents, she received more than 470 letters weighing in on her decision to leave the GOP, with approximately three-quarters supporting the switch.[18] Fukumoto remained an independent until approval of her request to join the Democratic Party on June 19, 2017.[5][6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Beth Fukumoto's Hawaii House District 36 Survey". The Civil Beat. July 30, 2012. Retrieved November 25, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Representative Beth Fukumoto Chang". Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii State Legislature. Archived from the original on November 28, 2014. Retrieved November 25, 2013. 
  3. ^ "Beth Fukumoto Chang's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved November 25, 2013. 
  4. ^ Traci G. Lee, March 23, 2017, NBC News, Hawaii Republican Leader Rep. Beth Fukumoto Officially Resigns From GOP, Retrieved March 23, 2017
  5. ^ a b Firozi, Paulina (2017-03-23). "Hawaii state lawmaker resigns from GOP". TheHill. Retrieved 2017-03-24. 
  6. ^ a b Bussewitz, Cathy (June 19, 2017). "Hawaii lawmaker switches to Democrat after criticizing Trump". ABC News. Retrieved June 19, 2017. 
  7. ^ "Beth Fukumoto for State House 36". Beth Fukumoto for State House 36. Retrieved 2017-03-23. 
  8. ^ Murphy, Patricia (September 3, 2013). "Nine Women Remaking the Right". The Daily Beast. Retrieved November 25, 2013. 
  9. ^ "The Fix’s 40 Under 40". Retrieved 3 February 2017. 
  10. ^ "Rodel Fellowships in Public Leadership - The Aspen Institute". Retrieved 3 February 2017. 
  11. ^ http://files.hawaii.gov/elections/files/results/2014/primary/cch.pdf
  12. ^ "Hawaii General 2012 - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 6, 2012" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved November 25, 2013. 
  13. ^ "Primary Election 2010 - State of Hawaii - Statewide September 18, 2010" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 4. Retrieved November 25, 2013. 
  14. ^ "General Election - State of Hawaii - Statewide November 2, 2010" (PDF). Honolulu, Hawaii: Hawaii Office of Elections. p. 2. Retrieved November 25, 2013. 
  15. ^ Chappell, Bill (February 2, 2017). "Hawaii's House Republican Leader Says She Was Ousted Over Women's March". NPR.org. Archived from the original on 2017-02-02. Retrieved 2017-03-23. 
  16. ^ 01, Star-Advertiser Staff Posted February; 1, 2017 February; 1, 2017 Updated February; 3:50pm, 2017. "State Rep. Fukumoto wants to leave Hawaii GOP". Retrieved 2017-02-02. 
  17. ^ "Hawaii Republican leader Rep. Beth Fukumoto officially resigns from GOP". NBC News. Retrieved 2017-03-22. 
  18. ^ Bussewitz, Cathy (March 22, 2017). "Hawaii Republican Resigns From Party After Criticizing Trump". Time. Retrieved March 23, 2017. 

External links[edit]