Beth Macy

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Beth Macy
BornUrbana, Ohio
Occupation
  • Journalist
  • Writer
Education
  • BS Journalism
  • MA Creative writing
Alma mater
Notable works
Notable awardsJ. Anthony Lukas Prize for Works in Progress (Factory Man) , Finalist - Kirkus Prize for Nonfiction (Factory Man, Dopesick)
Years active1989–present
SpouseTom Landon
ChildrenMaxwell (1994), Willis (1998)
Website
intrepidpapergirl.com
The cover of Beth Macy's second book, Truevine

Beth Macy is an American journalist and non-fiction writer. Her first published book, Factory Man, was a national bestseller.[1][2][3]

Early life[edit]

Macy grew up in Urbana, Ohio. She received a bachelor's degree in journalism from Bowling Green State University in 1986.[2] She earned a master's degree in creative writing from Hollins University in 1993.[4]

Career[edit]

Macy was a reporter for The Roanoke Times from 1989 to 2014.[5] She writes essays and op-eds for The New York Times as well as magazines, radio and online journals. In 2010, she was awarded the Nieman Fellowship for Journalism by Harvard University.[6]

Her 2018 book, Dopesick, was shortlisted for the 2019 Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction.[7]

Works[edit]

  • Factory Man: How One Furniture Maker Battled Offshoring, Stayed Local — and Helped Save an American Town (2014, Little Brown & Co., ISBN 9780316231435, OCLC 1003808101)[1]
  • Truevine: Two Brothers, a Kidnapping, and a Mother's Quest: A True Story of the Jim Crow South (2016, Little, Brown & Co., ISBN 9780316337540, OCLC 971462415)[8]
  • Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug Company That Addicted America (2018, Little, Brown & Co., ISBN 9780316551243, OCLC 1043454094)[9][10][11][12][13][14][15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Thinking Locally, So Fighting Globally". Nytimes.com. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  2. ^ a b "Beth Macy '86 : Storyteller". Bgsu.edu. Retrieved August 23, 2018.
  3. ^ Ralph Berrier Jr. "An unlikely hero: Q&A with Beth Macy, author of "Factory Man"". Roanoke.com. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  4. ^ Discussion with the Author: Beth Macy, Roanoke.com, retrieved August 23, 2018
  5. ^ Petrouske, Rosalie Sanara, "Before Leaving", And Here, Michigan State University Press, pp. 315–316, ISBN 9781609175412, retrieved August 9, 2018
  6. ^ "Nieman Fellows: Class of 2010". Harvard University. 2010. Retrieved August 15, 2018.
  7. ^ "ALA Unveils 2019 Carnegie Medals Shortlist". American Libraries. October 24, 2018. Retrieved November 20, 2018.
  8. ^ "Review: An Account of Black Albino Brothers in Beth Macy's 'Truevine'". Nytimes.com. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  9. ^ "The Worst Drug Crisis in American History". The New York Times. 2018-07-31. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  10. ^ ""Dopesick": Author reveals impact of painkillers on the opioid epidemic". CBS News. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  11. ^ "'Dopesick' is a page-turning look at the nation's opioid crisis and big Pharma". USA TODAY. Retrieved 2018-08-09.
  12. ^ "'Dopesick' brings the opioid epidemic to heart-breaking life". Christian Science Monitor. August 8, 2018. ISSN 0882-7729. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  13. ^ "Shooting up". The Boston Globe. Retrieved August 9, 2018.
  14. ^ "What One Journalist Learned From Researching The Causes Of The Opioid Epidemic". Npr.org. Retrieved August 22, 2018.
  15. ^ "Beth Macy Talks About 'Dopesick'". Nytimes.com. Retrieved August 22, 2018.

External links[edit]