Beverly Glenn-Copeland

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Beverly Glenn-Copeland
Bornc. 1944
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
GenresJazz, new age, folk
Occupation(s)Songwriter, musician, actor
InstrumentsGuitar, piano, synthesizer
Years active1970–present
LabelsGRT, Atlast
Associated acts
Websitewww.songcycles.com

Beverly Glenn-Copeland is a singer and songwriter who was born in Philadelphia, but has spent most of his life and career in Canada.[1] He is a trans man.[2][3]

Glenn-Copeland started his career as a folk singer incorporating jazz, classical, and blues elements.[4] He also performed on albums by Ken Friesen, Bruce Cockburn, Gene Murtynec, Bob Disalle and Kathryn Moses,[4] and was a writer on Sesame Street.[5] He spent twenty-five years entertaining children as a regular actor on Canadian children's television show Mr. Dressup.[6]

He is best known for his 1986 electronic album Keyboard Fantasies, recorded using equipment including a Yamaha DX7 and a Roland TR-707, that was rediscovered and given further attention in the 2010s.[7] The album was, before his gender transition was made public, selected as one of the 70 greatest recordings by women by The Stranger.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Exclusive: Watch Beverly-Glenn Copeland's Incredible Lecture at the Red Bull Music Academy Weekender in Montreal". Complex. Retrieved January 17, 2018.
  2. ^ "Voice soars above gender, says transgender man performing in Toronto this week". Retrieved December 1, 2017.
  3. ^ "The singer formerly seen as she". Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  4. ^ a b "Beverley Glenn-Copeland - Biography & History - AllMusic". AllMusic. Retrieved December 1, 2017.
  5. ^ Advisor, Resident. "Review: Beverly Glenn-Copeland - Copeland Keyboard Fantasies". Resident Advisor. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  6. ^ "Beverly Glenn-Copeland". SÉANCE CENTRE. Retrieved January 7, 2018.
  7. ^ "Invisible City Editions preps Beverly Glenn-Copeland reissue". October 20, 2016. Retrieved December 1, 2017.
  8. ^ "The Problem with NPR's '150 Greatest Albums Made by Women' List". Retrieved December 1, 2017.