Biathlon at the 2006 Winter Olympics

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Biathlon
at the XX Olympic Winter Games
Torino 2006 Jeremy Teela standing.jpg
Jeremy Teela (USA) in the men's individual event.
Venue Cesana San Sicario
Dates February 11–25
Competitors 204 from 37 nations
«2002 2010»

Biathlon at the 2006 Winter Olympics consisted of ten biathlon events. They were held at the Cesana-San Sicario arena. The events began on 11 February and ended on 25 February 2006. Approximately 6,500 spectators were expected by the organizing committee. In these games, biathlon events were open to both men and women but they raced in different distances in their own events.[1]

Men from 28 nations and women from 27 nations qualified to participate in the events. Only seven nations in total took home medals, Germany winning the most (5 gold, 4 silver, 2 bronze). Six biathletes won 3 medals each: Albina Akhatova, Kati Wilhelm, Martina Glagow, Michael Greis, Ole Einar Bjørndalen, and Sven Fischer. Greis won the most gold medals, with a total of three.

Qualification[edit]

The top 20 countries at the International Biathlon Union Nations Cup ranking of 2004–05 are permitted to pick four biathletes for each event, and five biathletes for the whole Olympics. The top five may send a sixth biathlete as a reserve. The countries seeded 21st to 28th (27th for women) may send a maximum of one biathlete. Other countries may not send biathletes unless the top 28 countries do not fill their quota. These restrictions apply to each gender, so that the countries who appear in the top 20 in both the men's and the women's list are able to send five men and five women. All entries were to have been submitted to the organizing committee by 30 January 2006.

The following table lists the 28 nations that qualified for the men's events and the 27 nations that qualified for the women's events:

Rank Men[2] Women[3] Rank Men Women
1  Norway (NOR)  Russia (RUS) 15  Estonia (EST)  Japan (JPN)
2  Germany (GER)  Germany (GER) 16  Slovenia (SLO)  Romania (ROU)
3  Russia (RUS)  Norway (NOR) 17  United States (USA)  Finland (FIN)
4  France (FRA)  France (FRA) 18  Slovakia (SVK)  Canada (CAN)
5  Austria (AUT)  China (CHN) 19  Canada (CAN)  Moldova (MDA)
6  Belarus (BLR)  Belarus (BLR) 20  Japan (JPN)  Latvia (LAT)
7  Sweden (SWE)  Slovenia (SLO) 21  Great Britain (GBR)  Sweden (SWE)
8  Ukraine (UKR)  Czech Republic (CZE) 22  China (CHN)  Kazakhstan (KAZ)
9  Czech Republic (CZE)  Bulgaria (BUL) 23  Kazakhstan (KAZ)  Lithuania (LTU)
10  Poland (POL)  Italy (ITA) 24  Bulgaria (BUL)  Estonia (EST)
11  Italy (ITA)  Slovakia (SVK) 25  Lithuania (LTU)  Great Britain (GBR)
12  Switzerland (SUI)  Ukraine (UKR) 26  Australia (AUS)  Bosnia and Herzegovina (BIH)
13  Latvia (LAT)  Poland (POL) 27  Romania (ROU)  Austria (AUT)
14  Finland (FIN)  United States (USA) 28  Hungary (HUN)

Medal summary[edit]

Medal table[edit]

Of the thirty-seven competing nations, seven of them took home all the medals. With over double the medals of any other nation, Germany ranked number one.

 Rank  Nation Gold Silver Bronze Total
1  Germany (GER) 5 4 2 11
2  Russia (RUS) 2 1 2 5
3  France (FRA) 2 0 2 4
4  Sweden (SWE) 1 1 0 2
5  Norway (NOR) 0 3 3 6
6  Poland (POL) 0 1 0 1
7  Ukraine (UKR) 0 0 1 1

[1]

Men's events[edit]

[1]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Individual
details
Michael Greis
 Germany
54:23.0 Ole Einar Bjørndalen
 Norway
54:39.0 Halvard Hanevold
 Norway
55:31.9
Sprint
details
Sven Fischer
 Germany
26:11.6 Halvard Hanevold
 Norway
26:19.8 Frode Andresen
 Norway
26:31.3
Pursuit
details
Vincent Defrasne
 France
35:20.2 Ole Einar Bjørndalen
 Norway
35:22.9 Sven Fischer
 Germany
35:35.8
Mass start
details
Michael Greis
 Germany
47:20.0 Tomasz Sikora
 Poland
47:26.3 Ole Einar Bjørndalen
 Norway
47:32.9
Relay
details
 Germany (GER)
Sven Fischer
Michael Greis
Ricco Groß
Michael Rösch
1:21:51.5  Russia (RUS)
Ivan Tcherezov
Sergei Tchepikov
Pavel Rostovtsev
Nikolay Kruglov, Jr.
1:22:12.4  France (FRA)
Julien Robert
Vincent Defrasne
Ferréol Cannard
Raphaël Poirée
1:22:35.1

Women's events[edit]

[1]

Event Gold Silver Bronze
Individual
details
Svetlana Ishmouratova
 Russia
49:24.1 Martina Glagow
 Germany
50:34.9 Albina Akhatova
 Russia
50:55.0
Sprint
details
Florence Baverel-Robert
 France
22:31.4 Anna Carin Olofsson
 Sweden
22:33.8 Lilia Efremova
 Ukraine
22:38.0
Pursuit
details
Kati Wilhelm
 Germany
36:43.6 Martina Glagow
 Germany
37:57.2 Albina Akhatova
 Russia
38:05.0
Mass start
details
Anna Carin Olofsson
 Sweden
40:36.5 Kati Wilhelm
 Germany
40:55.3 Uschi Disl
 Germany
41:18.4
Relay
details
 Russia (RUS)
Anna Bogaliy-Titovets
Svetlana Ishmouratova
Olga Zaitseva
Albina Akhatova
1:16:12.5  Germany (GER)
Martina Glagow
Andrea Henkel
Katrin Apel
Kati Wilhelm
1:17:03.2  France (FRA)
Delphyne Peretto
Florence Baverel-Robert
Sylvie Becaert
Sandrine Bailly
1:18:38.7

Participating nations[edit]

Thirty-seven nations contributed biathletes to compete in the events. Below is a list of the competing nations; in parentheses are the number of national competitors.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Torino 2006 Official Report - Biathlon" (PDF). Torino Organizing Committee. LA84 Foundation. March 2009. Retrieved September 21, 2009. 
  2. ^ Men's Nation Cup Score Final Result after 14 competitions, from biathlonworld.com, retrieved 19 January 2006
  3. ^ Women's Nation Cup Score Final Result after 14 competitions, from biathlonworld.com, retrieved 19 January 2006