Bible translations into the languages of India

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North Indian languages[edit]

East Indian languages[edit]

Northeast Indian languages[edit]

Dravidian languages[edit]

THEYYAM MANCHEYAATHAAYINA KATHE Theyyam Mancheyaathaayina Kathe, the Translation of the New Testament in the Paniya language was pioneered and presented by Bro. Mathews Vergis to the Paniya tribe on 30 December 2008. The Paniyas have historically worked as agricultural laborers. The Paniyas are mainly found in the borders of Kerala and Mysore, with a dwindling population of about approximately 120,000. Initially only the Gospel of Luke was translated and presented to the tribe. The Paniya language has no script of its own and hence Bro. Dr. Mathews Vergis has used the Malayalam script to present the Word of God in the language of their heart.

Bible Translation into Jennu Kuruba Language: Vasa Nyama, the Translation of the New Testament in the Jennu Kuruba language was pioneered and presented by Bro. Mathews Vergis to the Jennu Kuruba tribe on 10 September 2015. People of the Jennu Kuruba tribe are traditionally honey gatherers and are found in forests in Southern central India. Since the forests are getting slaughtered and synthetic honey is replacing natural honey, the tribe is decaying and the people are getting scattered. Initially only the Gospel of Mark was translated and presented to the tribe. The Holy Spirit guided Bro. Dr. Mathews Vergis to complete and present the entire New Testament because of the earnest and eagerness of the Jennu Kuruba believers, though few in number. The Jennu Kuruba language has no script of its own and hence Bro. Dr. Mathews Vergis has used the Kannada script to present the Word of God in the language of their heart. Incidentally this is the first piece of literature in print ever since the existence of this tribe on earth.

Bible Translation into Benjara Language: Navo Karar, the translation of the New Testament in the Benjara language of the Benjara ethnic tribe was pioneered and presented by Bro. Dr. Mathews Vergis on 12 August 2015. The people of the Benjara tribe migrated from Afghanistan and settled in Rajasthan, India long ago. They were salt merchants and suppliers of bullocks. Being nomadic in nature, they spread to different parts of India, namely Karnataka, Andhra Pradesh, Telangana, and Maharashtra. In Karnataka they are known as Lambanis and in other places as Lambadis. Among these states, the state of Karnataka has about a million Lambanis – the highest in India. The Benjara language has no script and the people are familiar with the language of the home states. Thus Kannada script is used to present the Word of God to the Lambanis to understand the Word in the language of their heart. This is the first piece of literature in print in the Benjara language.

Bible Translation into Kulu Language: Markana Nalla Shuddhi, the translation of the 'Gospel according to Mark' in the Kulu Language spoken by the ethnic Korama and Koracha tribes of South India, was pioneered by Bro. Dr. Mathews Vergis and was presented to the tribe on 28 December 2015. Though the language is spoken by around 200,000 of people belonging to the Koracha and Korama tribes, it failed to find a place in the dictionary of Indian tribal languages along with scores of other tribal languages recorded in the Census taken by the Government of India a decade and half ago. It was the request of the believers of the Koracha and Korama tribes that propelled Bro. Dr. Mathews Vergis to pioneer the translation of the Gospel according to Mark into the Kulu language. Incidentally this is the first piece of literature in print ever since the existence of the Koracha and Korama tribes on earth.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Holy Bible in the Sanscrit Language ...". Archive.org. Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
  2. ^ "The Bible in Sanskrit". Sanskritebooks.org. Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
  3. ^ "The Bible in Tulu". Worldscriptures.org. Retrieved 7 December 2014. 
  4. ^ https://web.archive.org/web/20120324021301/http://www.holybiblefoundation.org/home/tulu-bible. Archived from the original on 24 March 2012. Retrieved 5 April 2012.  Missing or empty |title= (help)