Bibliography of Stalinism and the Soviet Union

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This is a select bibliography of post World War II English language books (including translations) and journal articles about Stalinism and the Stalinist era of Soviet history. Book entries have references to journal reviews about them when helpful and available.

Works included below are referenced positively in the notes or bibliographies of scholarly secondary sources or journals. Included works should either be published by an academic or notable publisher, be authored by a notable subject matter expert or have significant scholarly journal reviews. Additional bibliographies can be found in many of the book-length works listed below. Stephen Kotkin's biography of Stalin has an extensive bibliography; Stalin: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928[1][2] contains a 52-page bibliography and Stalin: Waiting for Hitler, 1929-1941[3][4] contains a 50-page bibliography covering both the life of Stalin and Stalinism in the Soviet Union.[a] See Further Reading for several additional book and chapter length bibliographies worth consulting.

The period covered is 1924–1953, beginning approximately with the death of Lenin and ending approximately with the death of Stalin. This bibliography does not include the de-Stalinisation period.

Topics include the post-Lenin period of Stalin's consolidation of power from 1924-1926 and closely related topics such as the Soviet involvement in World War II, biographies of prominent individuals associated with the Stalinist era and the expansion of Stalinism during the immediate post World War II era. This bibliography does not include fiction, newspaper articles (expect in references), photo collections, or films created during or about Stalinism or the Stalinist Era.

This bibliography uses APA style citations.


General Surveys of Soviet History[edit]

These works contain significant overviews of the Stalinist era.

Period Surveys and Monographs (1924-1953)[edit]

Post War Era[edit]

Social History[edit]

{See also|Stalin's cult of personality}}

Culture[edit]

Soviet Socialist Realism
  • Barber, J. (1981). Soviet Historians in Crisis, 1928–1932. London, UK: Macmillan.[45][46]
  • Baumgartner, M. and Buehler, K. (2017). The Revolution is Dead - Long Live the Revolution: From Malevich to Judd, From Deineka to Bartana. New York, NY: Prestel/Random House.
  • Clark, K. (2001). Moscow, the Fourth Rome: Stalinism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Evolution of Soviet Culture, 1931-1941. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[47][48][49]
  • Enteen, G. (1989). The Stalinist Conception of Communist Party History. Studies in Soviet Thought, 37(4), pp. 259-274.
  • Feinstein, E. (2007). Anna of all the Russias: The Life of Anna Akhmatova. New York, NY: Knopf.[50]
  • Fitzpatrick, S. (1971). The Emergence of Glaviskusstvo. Class War on the Cultural Front, Moscow, 1928–29. Soviet Studies, 23(2), pp. 236-253.
  • ———. (1976). Culture and Politics under Stalin: A Reappraisal. Slavic Review, 35(2), pp. 211-231. doi:10.2307/2494589.
  • ———. (1990). Cultural Revolution in Russia: 1928–1931. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.[51][52]
  • ———. (1992). The Cultural Front: Power and Culture in Revolutionary Russia. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.[c][53][54][55][56]
  • Günther, H. (2003). The Culture of the Stalin Period. New York, NY: Macmillan.[57][58]
  • Hellbeck, J. (2016). Revolution on My Mind: Writing a Diary Under Stalin. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[59][60]
  • Kutulas, J. (1995). The Long War: The Intellectual People's Front and anti-Stalinism, 1930–1940. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.[61][62]
  • Stites, R. (1992). Russian Popular Culture: Entertainment and Society Since 1900. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[63][64]
  • Strong, J. W. (1990). Essays on Revolutionary Culture and Stalinism. Columbus, Ohio: Slavica Publications.[65]
  • Tromly, B. (2014). Making the Soviet Intelligentsia: Universities and Intelectual Life Under Stalin and Khrushchev. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[66][67][68]

Education[edit]

  • Fitzpatrick, S. (2002). The Commissariat of Enlightenment: Soviet Organization of Education and the Arts under Lunacharsky, October 1917 – 1921. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • ———. (2002). Education and Social Mobility in the Soviet Union 1921–1934. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[69][70][71]

Religion[edit]

The Arts and Socialist Realism[edit]

  • Bullitt, M. (1976). Toward a Marxist Theory of Aesthetics: The Development of Socialist Realism in the Soviet Union. The Russian Review, 35(1), pp. 53-76.
  • Conquest, R. (1979). The Pasternak Affair: Courage of Genius :A Documentary Report. New York, NY: Octagon Books.[77][78]
  • Demaitre, A. (1966). The Great Debate on Socialist Realism. The Modern Language Journal, 50(5), pp. 263-268.
  • Dobrenko, E. A., & Jonsson-Skradol, N. (2018). Socialist Realism in Central and Eastern European Literatures under Stalin. New York, NY: Anthem Press.[d]
  • Dovšenko, O. (1973). Alexander Dovzhenko: The Poet as Filmmaker. Cambridge, MA. Harvard University Press.[79][80]
  • Dunham, V. S., Sheldon, R., & Hough, J. F. (1990). In Stalin's Time: Middleclass Values in Soviet Fiction. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.[81][82]
  • Groys, B. (2014). The Total Art of Stalinism: Avant-Garde, Aesthetic Dictatorship, and Beyond. (C. Rougle Trans.) New York, NY: Verso Books.[83][84]
  • Fitzpatrick, S. (2002). The Commissariat of Enlightenment: Soviet Organization of Education and the Arts under Lunacharsky, October 1917 – 1921. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Horvath, R. (2006). The Poet of Terror: Dem'ian Bednyi and Stalinist Culture. The Russian Review, 65(1), pp. 53-71.
  • James, C. V. (2014). Soviet Socialist Realism: Origins and Theory. New York, NY: Palgrave Macmillan.[85][86]
  • Krylova, A. (2001). “Healers of Wounded Souls”: The Crisis of Private Life in Soviet Literature, 1944–1946. The Journal of Modern History, 73(2), pp. 307-331.
  • Maguire, R. A. (2000). Red Virgin Soil: Soviet Literature in the 1920s. Evanston, IL: Northwestern University Press.[87][88][89]
  • Masing-Delic, I. (2012). From Symbolism to Socialist Realism: A Reader. Boston, MA: Academic Studies Press.
  • McSmith, A. (2015). Fear and the Muse Kept Watch: The Russian Masters from Akhmatova and Pasternak to Shostakovich and Eisenstein Under Stalin. New York, NY: The New Press.
  • Petrov, P. M. (2015). Automatic for the Masses: The Death of the Author and the Birth of Socialist Realism. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.[90]
  • Pouncy, C. (2005). Stumbling Toward Socialist Realism: Ballet In Leningrad, 1927-1937. Russian History, 32(2), pp. 171-193.
  • Robin, R. (1992). Socialist Realism: An Impossible Aesthetic. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.[91][92][93]
  • Youngblood, D. J. (1991). Soviet Cinema in the Silent Era, 1918-1935. Austin, TX: University of Texas Press.[94][95]

Women and Children[edit]

Terror, Famine and the Gulag[edit]

Agriculture and the Peasantry[edit]

Industrialization and Urbanization[edit]

  • Allen, R. C. (2009). Farm to Factory: A Reinterpretation of the Soviet Industrial Revolution. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Davies, R. W. (1980). The Industrialization of Soviet Russia, The Soviet Collective Farm, 1929-1930. London, UK: Palgrave.[127]
  • Holloway, D. (2008). Stalin and the Bomb: The Soviet Union and Atomic Energy, 1939-1956. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
  • Gregory, P., & Markevich, A. (2002). Creating Soviet Industry: The House That Stalin Built. Slavic Review, 61(4), pp. 787–814.
  • Kotkin, S. (1997). Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization. Berkeley, CA: University of California Press.[137][138][139]
  • Kuromiya, H. (1990). Stalin's Industrial Revolution: Politics and Workers, 1928-1932. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[140][141][142]
  • Scott, J. (1989). Behind the Urals: An American Worker in Russia's City of Steel. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
  • Shearer, D. R. (2018). Industry, State, and Society in Stalin's Russia, 1926-1934. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Siegelbaum, L. H., & Suny, R. G. (1994). Making Workers Soviet: Power, Class, and Identity. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.[143][144]
  • Smith, S. A. (1997). Russian Workers and the Politics of Social Identity. The Russian Review, 56(1), pp. 1-7.
  • Stone, D. (2005). First Five-Year Plan and the Geography of Soviet Defence Industry. Europe-Asia Studies, 57(7), pp. 1047–1063.

Stalinism and Ideologies[edit]

  • Biggart, J. (1981). "Anti-Leninist Bolshevism": The Forward Group of the RSDRP. Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue Canadienne Des Slavistes, 23(2), pp. 134–153.
  • Brandenberger, D., & Dubrovsky, A. (1998). 'The People Need a Tsar': The Emergence of National Bolshevism as Stalinist Ideology, 1931-1941. Europe-Asia Studies, 50(5), pp. 873–892.
  • Campeanu, P. (2016). Origins of Stalinism: From Leninist Revolution to Stalinist Society. London, UK: Routledge.
  • Conquest, R. (1992). Stalin: Breaker of Nations. New York, NY: Penguin Books.
  • Daniels, R. V. (1960). The Conscience Of The Revolution: Communist Opposition In Soviet Russia. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[145][146][147][148]
  • Daniels, R. V. (1972). The Stalin Revolution: Foundations of Soviet Totalitarianism. Lexington, MA: D.C. Heath and Company.
  • Daniels, R. V. (1991). The Left Opposition as an Alternative to Stalinism. Slavic Review, 50(2), pp. 277–285.
  • Gellately, R. (2016). Stalin's Curse: Battling for Communism in War and Cold War. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • Geyer, M., & Fitzpatrick, S. (2009). Beyond Totalitarianism: Stalinism and Nazism Compared. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[149][150][151]
  • Gregor, A. J. (2009). Marxism, Fascism, and Totalitarianism: Chapters in the Intellectual History of Radicalism. Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.
  • Fitzpatrick, S. (2006). Stalinism: New Directions. London, UK: Routledge.
  • Hoffman, D. (Ed.). (2002). Stalinism: The Essential Readings. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Kershaw, I., & Lewin, M. (1997). Stalinism and Nazism: Dictatorships in Comparison. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Mccauley, M. (2015). Stalin and Stalinism. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Medvedev, R. A. (1979). On Stalin and Stalinism. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • Naimark, N., Pons, S., & Quinn-Judge, S. (Eds.). (2017). The Cambridge History of Communism: Volume 2, The Socialist Camp and World Power 1941–1960s. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[g]
  • Pauley, B. F. (2015). Hitler, Stalin, and Mussolini: Totalitarianism in the Twentieth Century. West Sussex, UK: Wiley-Blackwell.
  • Plamper, J. (2012). The Stalin Cult: A Study in the Alchemy of Power. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.[152]
  • Pons, S., & Smith, S. A. (Eds.). (2017). The Cambridge History of Communism: Volume 1, World Revolution and Socialism in One Country 1917–1941. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[g]
  • Reiman, M. (1987). The Birth of Stalinism: The USSR on the Eve of the "Second Revolution". Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
  • Schull, J. (1992). The Ideological Origins of “Stalinism” in Soviet Literature. Slavic Review, 51(3), pp. 468–484.
  • Van Ree, E. (1994). Stalin's Bolshevism: The First Decade. International Review of Social History, 39(3), pp. 361–381.
  • Von Laue, T. (1983). Stalin in Focus. Slavic Review, 42(3), pp. 373–389.
  • White, E. (2007). The Socialist Revolutionary Party, Ukraine, and Russian National Identity in the 1920s. The Russian Review, 66(4), pp. 549–567.
  • Wood, A. (2005). Stalin and Stalinism. London, UK: Routledge.

Stalin and Lenin[edit]

Stalin and Trotsky[edit]

Propaganda[edit]

  • Bonnell, V. E. (1999). Iconography of Power: Soviet Political Posters under Lenin and Stalin. Berkeley, Calif: University of California Press.[155][156]
  • Brandenberger, D. (2012). Propaganda State in Crisis: Soviet Ideology, Indoctrination, and Terror under Stalin, 1927–1941. Yale University Press.[157][158]
  • Davies, S. (1999). Popular Opinion in Stalin's Russia: Terror, Propaganda and Dissent, 1934–1941. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.[33][34][35][36]
  • Thompson, E. (1991). Nationalist Propaganda in the Soviet Russian Press, 1939-1941. Slavic Review, 50(2), pp. 385–399.
  • Westerman, F., Garrett, S., & Westerman, F. (2011). Engineers of the Soul: The Grandiose Propaganda of Stalin's Russia. New York, NY: The Overlook Press.

Soviet Territories[edit]

For Terror and Famine related works, see Terror, Famine and the Gulag section.

Foreign Policy[edit]

  • Gati, C. (1984). The Stalinist Legacy in Soviet Foreign Policy. Proceedings of the Academy of Political Science, 35(3), pp. 214-226.
  • Gellately, R. (2016). Stalin's Curse: Battling for Communism in War and Cold War. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • McDermott, K. (1995). Stalinist Terror in the Comintern: New Perspectives. Journal of Contemporary History, 30(1), pp. 111–130.
  • McDermott, K., & Agnew, J. (1997). The Comintern: A History of International Communism from Lenin to Stalin. New York, NY: St. Martin's Press.
  • Rieber, A. J. (2015). Stalin and the Struggle for Supremacy in Eurasia. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Snyder, T., & Brandon, R. (2014). Stalin and Europe: Imitation and Domination, 1928-1953. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.
  • Staklo, V. A. (2008). Enemies Within the Gates?: The Comintern and the Stalinist Repression, 1934-1939. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Ulam, A. B. (1974). Expansion and Coexistence: Soviet Foreign Policy, 1917-73. New York, NY: Praeger.[174]

Government, Party and Economics[edit]

Soviet Postage Stamp (1933)
  • Bailes, K. E. (2016). Technology and Society under Lenin and Stalin: Origins of the Soviet Technical Intelligentsia, 1917-1941. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Cohn, E. (2015). The High Title of a Communist: Postwar Party Discipline and the Values of the Soviet Regime. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Davies, R. W. (1998). The Soviet Economy in Turmoil, 1929-1930. New York, NY: Macmillan Press.[175][176]
  • Dohan, M. (1976). The Economic Origins of Soviet Autarky 1927/28-1934. Slavic Review, 35(4), pp. 603–635.
  • Dunmore, T. (1980). The Stalinist Command Economy: The Soviet State Apparatus and Economic Policy 1945-53. London, UK: Macmillan.
  • Dunmore, T. (1984). Soviet Politics, 1945-53. London, UK: Macmillan Press.
  • Fitzpatrick, S. (1979). Stalin and the Making of a New Elite, 1928-1939. Slavic Review, 38(3), pp. 377–402.
  • ———. (2015). On Stalin's Team: The Years of Living Dangerously in Soviet Politics. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Getty, J. A. (2013). Practicing Stalinism: Bolsheviks, Boyars, and the Persistence of Tradition. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
  • Gill, G. (1990). The Origins of the Stalinist Political System. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Gorlizki, Y., & Chlevnjuk, O. V. (2008). Cold Peace: Stalin and the Soviet Ruling Circle, 1945-1953. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.[177]
  • Gregor, R. (2019). Resolutions and Decisions of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Volume 2: The Early Soviet Period 1917-1929. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.
  • Hahn, W. G. (2019). Postwar Soviet Politics: The Fall of Zhdanov and the Defeat of Moderation, 1946-53. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Hanson, P. (2016). Rise and Fall of the Soviet Economy: An Economic History of the USSR, 1945-1991. New York, NY: Routledge.[178]
  • Hunter, H. (1973). The Overambitious First Soviet Five-Year Plan. Slavic Review, 32(2), pp. 237–257.
  • Lampert, N. (2016). Technical Intelligentsia and the Soviet State. London, UK: Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Manning, R. T. (1984). Government in the Soviet Countryside in the Stalinist thirties: The case of Belyi Raion in 1937. Pittsburgh, Pa: University of Pittsburgh Press.
  • McNeal, R. H. (1971). The Decisions of the CPSU and the Great Purge. Soviet Studies, 232, pp. 177–185.
  • McNeal, R. H. (2019). Resolutions and Decisions of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, Volume 3: The Stalin Years 1929-1953. Toronto, ON: University of Toronto Press.
  • Nation, R. C. (2018). Black Earth, Red Star: A History of Soviet Security Policy, 1917-1991. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.[179][180]
  • Nove, A. (1993). An Economic History of the USSR. New York, NY: Penguin Books.[181][182][183]
  • Rassweiler, A. (1983). Soviet Labor Policy in the First Five-Year Plan: The Dneprostroi Experience. Slavic Review, 42(2), pp. 230–246.
  • Rigby, T. H. (1968). Communist Party Membership in the USSR, 1917-1967. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.
  • Rigby, T. H., Brown, A., Reddaway, P., & Schapiro, L. (1983). Authority, Power and Policy in the USSR: Essays Dedicated to Leonard Schapiro. London, UK: Macmillan.
  • Rittersporn, G. (1984). Soviet Officialdom and Political Evolution: Judiciary Apparatus and Penal Policy in the 1930s. Theory and Society, 13(2), pp. 211–237.
  • Rosenfeldt, N. E. (1978). Knowledge and Power: The Role of Stalin's Secret Chancellery in the Soviet System of Government. Copenhagen: Rosenkilde and Bagger.
  • Schapiro, L. (1985). The Communist Party of the Soviet Union. London, UK: Methuen Publishing.

The Soviet Armed Forces[edit]

  • Clark, P. (1981). Changsha in the 1930: Red Army Occupation. Modern China, 7(4), pp. 413–444.
  • Erickson, J. (2001). The Soviet High Command: A Military-Political History, 1918-1941. London, UK: Routledge.
  • Glantz, D. M. (1998). Stumbling Colossus: The Red Army on the Eve of World War. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.
  • Glantz, D. M. (2005). Colossus Reborn: The Red Army at War: 1941-1943. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.
  • Hill, A. (2019). The Red Army and the Second World War. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Hooton, E. R. (2013). 'Stalin's Claws, From the Purges to the Winter War: Red Army Operations before Barbarossa, 1937–1941. West Sussex, UK: Tattered Flag Press.[184]
  • Kavalerchik, B., Lopukhovsky, L., & Orenstein, H. (2017). The Price of Victory: The Red Army's Casualties in the Great Patriotic War. South Yorkshire, UK: Pen and Sword Military.
  • Kolkowicz, R. (1967). The Soviet Military and the Communist Party. London, UK: Routledge.[185]
  • Krylova, A. (2014). Soviet Women in Combat: A History of Violence on the Eastern Front. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Mark, J. (2005). Remembering Rape: Divided Social Memory and the Red Army in Hungary 1944-1945. Past & Present, (188), pp. 133-161.
  • Merridale, C. (2006). Culture, Ideology and Combat in the Red Army, 1939-45. Journal of Contemporary History, 41(2), pp. 305-324.
  • Merridale, C. (2007). Ivan's War: Life and Death in the Red Army, 1939–1945. New York, NY: Metropolitan Books.
  • Nikolaieff, A. (1947). The Red Army in the Second World War. The Russian Review, 7(1), pp. 49-60.
  • Reese, R. R. (1996). Stalin's Reluctant Soldiers: A Social History of the Red Army, 1925–1941. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.
  • Reese, R. (1996). Red Army Opposition to Forced Collectivization, 1929-1930: The Army Wavers. Slavic Review, 55(1), pp. 24-45. doi:10.2307/2500977.
  • Reese, R. R. (2011). Why Stalin's Soldiers Fought: The Red Army's Military Effectiveness in World War II. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.
  • Roberts, C. (1995). Planning for War: The Red Army and the Catastrophe of 1941. Europe-Asia Studies, 47(8), pp. 1293-1326.
  • Statiev, A. (2010). Penal Units in the Red Army. Europe-Asia Studies, 62(5), pp. 721-747.
  • Von, H. M., & Gilbert S. (1993). Soldiers in the Proletarian Dictatorship: The Red Army and the Soviet Socialist State, 1917–1930. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Whitewood, P. (2015). The Red Army and the Great Terror: Stalin's Purge of the Soviet Military. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.

The Soviet Union and War[edit]

Stalingrad
  • Buttar, P. (2015). Between Giants: The Battle for the Baltics in World War II. Oxford, UK: Osprey Publishing.
  • David-Fox, M., Holquist, P., & Martin, A. M. (2012). Fascination and Enmity: Russia and Germany as entangled histories, 1914–1945. Pittsburgh, PA: University of Pittsburgh Press.[186][187][188]
  • Glantz, D. M. (2014). Stalin’s Strategic Intentions, 1941–1945: Soviet Military Operations as Indicators of Stalin’s Postwar Territorial Ambitions. The Journal of Slavic Military Studies, 27(4), pp. 676-720.
  • Goldman, S. D. (2013). Nomonhan, 1939: The Red Army's Victory that Shaped World War II. Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press.
  • Hill, A. (2017). The Red Army and the Second World War. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Linz, S. J. (1985). The Impact of World War II on the Soviet Union. Totowa, NJ: Rowman & Allanheld.
  • Merridale, C. (2007). Ivan's War: Life and Death in the Red Army, 1939–1945. New York, NY: Metropolitan Books.
  • Noggle, A. (2007). A Dance with Death: Soviet Airwomen in World War II. College Station, TX: Texas A&M University Press.[189][190]
  • Roberts, G. (2011). Stalin's Wars: From World War to Cold War, 1939-1953. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.[191][192]
  • Weiner, A. (2012). Making Sense of War: The Second World War and the Fate of the Bolshevik Revolution. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.[193][194][195]

Spanish Civil War (1936-1939)[edit]

  • Beevor, A. (2014). The Battle for Spain: The Spanish Civil War 1936–1939. New York, NY: Penguin Books.
  • Hooton, E. R. (2019). Spain in Arms: A Military History of the Spanish Civil War 1936–1939. Philadelphia, PA: Casemate Books.
  • Krammer, A. (1973). Spanish Volunteers against Bolshevism: The Blue Division. The Russian Review, 32(4), pp. 388-402.
  • Payne, S. G. (2012). The Spanish Civil War. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Preston, P. (2016). The Spanish Civil War: Reaction, Revolution and Revenge. London, UK: William Collins.
  • Thomas, H. (1977). The Spanish Civil War. New York, NY: HarperCollins.

The Soviet Homefront during World War II[edit]

  • Barber, J., & Harrison, M. (1991). The Soviet Home Front, 1941-1945: A Social and Economic History of the USSR in World War II. London, UK: Longman.[196][197]
  • Bidlack, R. (2000). The Political Mood in Leningrad during the First Year of the Soviet-German War. The Russian Review, 59(1), pp. 96-113.
  • Braithwaite, R. (2010). Moscow 1941: A City and Its People at War. London, UK: Profile Books.[198]
  • Collingham, E. M. (2013). The Taste of War: World War II and the Battle for Food. New York, NY: Penguin Books.
  • Garrard, J., & Garrard, C. (1993). World War 2 and the Soviet People. New York, NY: Macmillan.
  • Jekelʹčyk, S. O. (2014). Stalin's Citizens: Everyday Politics in the Wake of Total War. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
  • Kragh, M. (2011). Soviet Labour Law during the Second World War. War in History, 18(4), pp. 531-546.
  • Manley, R. (2012). To the Tashkent Station: Evacuation and Survival in the Soviet Union at War. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.
  • Reid, A. (2012). Leningrad: The Epic Siege of World War II, 1941–1944. New York, Ny: Walker & Co.
  • Stites, R. (1995). Culture and Entertainment in Wartime Russia. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.
  • Thurston, R. W., & Bonwetsch, B. (2000). The People's War: Responses to World War II in the Soviet Union. Urbana, IL: University of Illinois Press.
  • Weiner, A. (1996). The Making of a Dominant Myth: The Second World War and the Construction of Political Identities within the Soviet Polity. The Russian Review, 55(4), pp. 638-660.

Genocide and War Crimes[edit]

This section contains works relating to war crimes and acts of genocide committed by or against the Soviets and events of the Holocaust committed on Soviet territory.

  • Arad, Y. (2013). The Holocaust in the Soviet Union. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.[199][200][201]
  • Beevor, A. (2014). The Fall of Berlin 1945. New York: Penguin Books.
  • Beorn, W. W. (2014). Marching into Darkness: The Wehrmacht and the Holocaust in Belarus. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.[202][203]
  • Cassedy, E. (2012). We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust. Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press.[204]
  • Gerhard, G. (2017). Nazi Hunger Politics: A History of Food in the Third Reich. Lanham, MD: Rowman & Littlefield.[205][206]
  • Kay, A. J., Rutherford, J., & Stahel, D. (2014). Nazi Policy on the Eastern Front, 1941: Total War, Genocide, and Radicalization. Rochester, NY: University of Rochester Press.
  • Kershaw, I. (2014). The End: The Defiance and Destruction of Hitler's Germany, 1944-1945. New York, NY: Penguin Books.
  • Lower, W. (2007). Nazi Empire-building and the Holocaust in Ukraine. Chapel Hill, NC: University of North Carolina Press.[207][208][209][210]
  • Sanford, G. (2006). The Katyn Massacre and Polish-Soviet Relations, 1941-43. Journal of Contemporary History, 41(1), pp. 95-111.
  • Steinhart, E. C. (2018). The Holocaust and Germanization of Ukraine. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

The Nazi-Soviet Alliance Period (1939-1941)[edit]

  • Hiden, J., & Lane, T. (2011). The Baltic and the Outbreak of the Second World War. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Rentola, K. (2013). Intelligence and Stalin's Two Crucial Decisions in the Winter War, 1939–40. The International History Review, 35(5), pp. 1089-1112.
  • Moorhouse, R. (2014). The Devils' Alliance: Hitler's Pact with Stalin, 1939–1941. New York, NY: Basic Books.[211][212]
  • Moorhouse, R. (2020). Poland 1939: The Outbreak of World War II. New York, NY: Basic Books.
  • Roberts, G. (1990). The Unholy Alliance: Stalin's Pact with Hitler. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.[213][214]
  • Sanford, G. (2005). Katyn and the Soviet Massacre of 1940: Truth, Justice and Memory. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Uldricks, T. J. (1977). Stalin and Nazi Germany. Slavic Review, 36(4), pp. 599-603.
  • Uldricks, T. J. (1999). The Icebreaker Controversy: Did Stalin Plan to Attack Hitler?. Slavic Review, 58(3), pp. 626–643.

War with Nazi Germany[edit]

These works focus on Soviet experiences and operations and the war from Soviet perspective. For a more complete list of works about the Eastern front during World War II, see Bibliography of World War II.

  • Beevor, Antony. (1998). Stalingrad: The Fateful Siege: 1942–1943. New York, NY: Penguin Books.
  • Bellamy, C. (2007). Absolute War: Soviet Russia in the Second World War. New York, NY: Knopf.[215]
  • Glantz, D. M. (1991). From the Don to the Dnepr: Soviet Offensive Operations. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Glantz, D. M. (2009). After Stalingrad: The Red Army's Winter Offensive, 1942–1943. Warwick, UK: Helion and Company
  • Glantz, D. M. (2009). Stalingrad (3 vols.). Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas
  • Glantz, D. M. (2010/2012/2014). Barbarossa Derailed (3 vols.). Warwick, UK: Helion and Company.
  • Glantz, D. M. (2011). Operation Barbarossa: Hitler's Invasion of Russia, 1941. Cheltenham, UK: History Press.
  • Glantz, D. M., & House, J. M. (2015). When Titans Clashed: How the Red Army Stopped Hitler. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.[216][217]
  • Hardesty, V., & Grinberg, I. (2019). Red Phoenix Rising: The Soviet Air Force in World War II. Lawrence, KS: University Press of Kansas.[218]
  • Harvey, A. (2018). The Russian Air Force Versus the Luftwaffe: A Western European View. Air Power History, 65(1), pp. 23-30.
  • Overy, R. (1997). Russia's War: A History of the Soviet Effort: 1941–1945. New York, NY: Penguin Books.
  • Snyder, T. (2010). Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. New York, NY: Basic Books[219][220]

The Allies and the Soviet Union in World War II[edit]

Other Studies[edit]

The Beginning of the Cold War and the Soviet Bloc[edit]

Historiography[edit]

Reference Works[edit]

  • The Cambridge Encyclopedia of Russia and the former Soviet Union. (1994). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Kasack, W. & Atack, R. (1988). Dictionary of Russian literature since 1917. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.
  • Minahan, J. (2012). The Former Soviet Union's Diverse Peoples: A Reference Sourcebook. Santa Barbara, CA: ABC-CLIO.
  • Smith, S. A. (2014). The Oxford Handbook of the History of Communism. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.[227][228]
  • Vronskaya, J. & Čuguev, V. (1992). The Biographical Dictionary of the Former Soviet Union: Prominent people in all fields from 1917 to the present. London, UK: Bowker-Saur.

Other Works[edit]

Legacy[edit]

Biographies[edit]

Joseph Stalin in 1942.

Joseph Stalin[edit]

  • Conquest, R. (1991). Stalin: Breaker of Nations. New York, NY: Viking Press.
  • Davies, S., & Harris, J. (Eds.). (2005). Stalin: A New History. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Deutscher, I. (1996). Stalin: A Political Biography. London, UK: Penguin.
  • Khlevniuk, O. V., & Favorov, N. S. (2015). Stalin: New Biography of a Dictator. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.[j]
  • Kotkin, S. (2014). Stalin. (Vol. 1). Paradoxes of power, 1878-1928. New York, NY: Penguin Books.[237][238][239][240]
  • Kotkin, S. (2017). Stalin. (Vol. 2). Waiting for Hitler, 1928-1941. New York, NY: Penguin Books.[241]
  • Laqueur, W. (2002). Stalin: The Glasnost Revelations. New York, NY: Scribner.[242]
  • Medvedev, Z. A., Medvedev, R. A., & Dahrendorf, E. (2006). The Unknown Stalin. London, UK: I.B. Tauris.
  • Sebag, S. (2004). Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar. New York, NY: Knopf.[k][243][244][245]
  • Montefiore, S. (2007). Young Stalin. New York, NY: Knopf.[246]
  • Rubenstein, J. (2016). The Last Days of Stalin. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
  • Service, R. W. (2006). Stalin: A Biography. Cambridge, MA: Belknap Press.[247]

Other[edit]

  • Cohen, S. F. (1980). Bukharin and the Bolshevik Revolution: A Political Biography, 1888-1938. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.[248][249]
  • Feinstein, E. (2007). Anna of all the Russias: The Life of Anna Akhmatova. New York, NY: Knopf.
  • Getty, J. A., & Naumov, O. V. (2008). Yezhov: The rise of Stalin's "Iron Fist. New Haven (Conn.: Yale University Press.[250]
  • Jansen, M., & Petrov, N. (2002). Stalin's Loyal Executioner: People's Commissar Nikolai Ezhov, 1895-1940. Palo Alto, CA: Hoover Institution Press.[117][118]
  • Knight, A. (1993). Beria: Stalin's First Lieutenant. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.[251][252]
  • Roberts, G. (2011). Molotov: Stalin's Cold Warrior. Washington, D.C: Potomac Books.[253][254]
  • Roberts, G. (2012). Stalin's General: The Life of Georgy Zhukov. New York, NY: Random House.[255]

Memoirs and Literary Accounts[edit]

Gulag and Purge Survivor Memoirs

  • Ginzburg, E. (2014). Journey Into the Whirlwind. San Diego, CA: Helen & Kurt Wolff Books.
  • Mandelʹshtam, N. (2011). Hope Abandoned and Hope Against Hope. Various.
  • Shalamov, V., & Rayfield, D. (2018). Kolyma Stories. New York, NY: New York Review Books.

English Language Translations of Primary Sources[edit]

Joseph Stalin[edit]

Collected Works by Joseph Stalin

  • The Collected Works of J. V. Stalin, 16 vols. 1901-1952. (1953–54). Collection Index and Text
  • Correspondence with Franklin D. Roosevelt and Harry S. Truman. (1941-1945). Collection Index and Text.
  • Correspondence with Winston S. Churchill and Clement R. Attlee. (1941-1945). Collection Index and Text.
  • Josef Stalin Internet Archive. Collection Index and Text
  • War Speeches, Orders of the Day and Answers to Foreign Press Correspondents During the Great Patriotic War. (1941-1945). Collection Index and Text.
  • Lih, L. T., Naumov, O. V., & Khlevniuk, O. V. (1996). Stalin's Letters to Molotov, 1925-1936. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.

Individual Works by Joseph Stalin

  • Briefly About Disagreements in the Party. (1905). Text.
  • Anarchism or Socialism?. (1906-7). Text.
  • Marxism and the National Question. (1913). Text.
  • Report to Comrade Lenin by the Commission of the Party Central Committee and the Council of Defence on the Reasons for the Fall of Perm. (1919). Text.
  • Our Disagreements. (1921). Text.
  • Thirteenth Conference of the R.C.P.(B). (1924). [Thirteenth Conference of the R.C.P.(B) Text].
  • On the Death of Lenin. (1924). Text.
  • The Foundations of Leninism. (1924). Text.
  • Trotskyism or Leninism?. (1924). Text.
  • The October Revolution & the Tactics of the Russian Communists. (1924). Text.
  • The Fourteenth Congress of the C.P.S.U.(B.). (1925). Text.
  • Concerning Questions of Leninism. (1926). Text.
  • The Social-Democratic Deviation in our Party. (1926). Text.
  • Reply to the Report on “The Social-Democratic Deviation in our Party”. (1926). Text.
  • The Seventh Enlarged Plenum of the E.C.C.I.. (1926). Text.
  • The Trotskyist Opposition Before and Now. (1927). Text.
  • The Fifteenth Congress of the C.P.S.U.(B.). (1927). Text.
  • The Work of the April Joint Plenum of the Central Committee and Central Control Commission. (1928). Text.
  • Plenum of the C.C., C.P.S.U.(B.). (1928). Text.
  • Results of the July Plenum of the C.C., C.P.S.U.(B.). (1928). Text.
  • The Right Danger in the C.P.S.U.(B.). (1928). Text.
  • Industrialisation of the country and the Right Deviation in the C.P.S.U.(B.). (1928). Text.
  • The National Question and Leninism. (1929). Text.
  • The Right Deviation in the C.P.S.U.(B.). (1929). Text.
  • Concerning Questions of Agrarian Policy in the U.S.S.R.. (1929). Text.
  • Dizzy with Success. (1930). Text.
  • Anti-Semitism. (1931). Text.
  • Some Questions Concerning the History of Bolshevism. (1931). Text.
  • The Results of the First Five-Year Plan. (1933). Text.
  • Work in the Countryside. (1931). Text.
  • Report to the Seventeenth Party Congress on the Work of the Central Committee of the C.P.S.U.(B.). (1934). Text.
  • Marxism Versus Liberalism. (1934). Text.
  • Remarks on a Summary of the Manual of the History of the USSR. (1934). Text.
  • . (1934). [ Text].
  • Remarks on a Summary of the Manual of the Modern History. (1934). Text.
  • Interview Between J. Stalin and Roy Howard. (1936). Text.
  • 'On the Draft Constitution of the U.S.S.R'. (1936). Text.
  • Defects in Party Work and Measures for Liquidating Trotskyite and Other Double Dealers. (1937). Text.
  • Dialectical and Historical Materialism. (1938). Text.
  • History of the C.P.S.U.(B) (Short Course). (1939). Text.
  • Report on the Work of the Central Committee to the Eighteenth Congress of the C.P.S.U.(B.). (1939). Text.
  • Radio Broadcast. (July 3, 1941). Text.
  • On the Allied Landing in Northern France. (1944). Text.
  • Stalin's Address to the People (Victory Speech). (May 9, 1945). Text.
  • Coexistence, American-Soviet Cooperation, Atomic Energy, Europe. (1947). Text.
  • Berlin Crisis, the U.N. and Anglo-American Aggressive Policies, Churchill. (1948). Text.
  • Economic Problems of Socialism in the USSR. (1952). Text.

Other Works[edit]

Collections

Individual Works

  • The Five Year Plan - Originally published February 1930. From Marxists Internet Archive (2008)
  • Brandenberger, D., & Zelenov, M. (2019). Stalin's Master Narrative: A Critical Edition of the History of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union (Bolsheviks), Short Course. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
  • Tukhachevsky, M. (1936). Marshal Tukhachevsky on the Red Army. The Slavonic and East European Review, 14(42), pp. 694–701.

Government Documents

Further reading[edit]

Bibliographies[edit]

Bibliographies contain English and non-English language entries unless noted otherwise.

Bibliographies of Stalinist Era in the Soviet Union

  • Applebaum, A. (2003). Bibliography. In Gulag: A History. New York, NY: Doubleday.
  • Applebaum, A. (2012). Bibliography. In Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1944-1956. New York, NY: Doubleday.
  • Applebaum, A. (2017). Selected Bibliography. In Red Famine: Stalin's War on Ukraine. New York, NY: Doubleday.
  • Brandenberger, D. (2012). Notes. In Propaganda State in Crisis: Soviet Ideology, Indoctrination, and Terror under Stalin, 1927-1941. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
  • Egan, D. R., & Egan, M. A. (2007). Joseph Stalin: An Annotated Bibliography of English-language Periodical Literature to 2005. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press.[256]
  • Figes, O. (2015). A Short Guide To Further Reading. In Revolutionary Russia, 1891-1991. New York, NY: Metropolitan Books.[r]
  • Fitzpatrick, S. (1994). On Bibliography and Sources. In Stalin's Peasants: Resistance and Survival in the Russian Village after Collectivization. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.[53][54][55][56]
  • ———. (1999). Bibliography. In Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Soviet Russia in the 1930s. New York, NY: Oxford University Press.[s]
  • ———. (2006). Further Reading. In Stalinism: New Directions. London, UK: Routledge.[t]
  • ———. (2015). Bibliography. In On Stalin's Team: The Years of Living Dangerously in Soviet Politics. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.[u]
  • ———, & Viola, L. (2016). A Researcher's Guide to Sources on Soviet Social History in the 1930s. New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Getty, J. A., Naumov, O. V., & Sher, B. (2002). Notes. In The Road to Terror: Stalin and the Self-Destruction of the Bolsheviks, 1932-1939. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
  • Getty, J. A. (2013). Notes. In Practicing Stalinism: Bolsheviks, Boyars, and the Persistence of Tradition. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press.
  • Hill, A. (2017). Bibliography. In The Red Army and the Second World War. Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.
  • Kotkin, S. (2014/2017). Bibliography. In Stalin (Vol. 1 Paradoxes of Power, Vol. 2 Waiting for Hitler, Vol. 3 forthcoming). New York, NY: Penguin Books. [v]
  • Kutulas, J. (1995). Selected Bibliography. In The Long War: The Intellectual People's Front and anti-Stalinism, 1930-1940. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.
  • McNeal, R. H. (1967). Stalin's Works: An annotated bibliography. Palo Alto, CA: The Hoover Institution, Standford University.
  • Shearer, D. R. (2018). Bibliography. In Industry, State, and Society in Stalin's Russia, 1926-1934. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.

Bibliographies of Russian (Soviet) History containing significant material on the Stalinist era in the Soviet Union

  • Edelheit, A. J., & Edelheit, H. (1992). The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union: A selected bibliography of sources in English. Westport, CT: Greenwood Publishing.[257]
  • Grierson, P. (1969). Books on Soviet Russia: 1917 - 1942 ; a Bibliography and a Guide to Reading. Twickenham, UK: Anthony C. Hall.
  • Horecky, P. L. (1971). Russia and the Soviet Union: A Bibliographic Guide to Western-language Publications. Chicago, IL: The University of Chicago Press.
  • Kenez, P. (2016). Soviet History: A Bibliography. In A History of the Soviet Union from the Beginning to its Legacy (3rd Edition). Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.[w]
  • Schaffner, B. L. (1995). Bibliography of the Soviet Union, its Predecessors and Successors. Metuchen, NJ: Scarecrow Press.
  • Spapiro, D. (1962). A Select Bibliography of Works in English on Russian History,1801-1917. Oxford, UK: Blackwell.
  • Simmons, E. J. (1962). Russia: Selective and Annotated Bibliography. The Slavic and East European Journal, 6(2), pp. 148–158. doi:10.2307/3086102

Bibliographies of Primary Source Documents

  • Figes, O. (2008). The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin's Russia. New York, NY: Picador.[x]

Journals[edit]

The list below contains journals frequently referenced in this bibliography.

Journals related to Russian (Soviet) History

Lists of Journals related to Russian (Soviet) History

Journals related to the Cold War

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ For inforamtion about Kotkin's Stalin biography, wee entries in Biographies section.
  2. ^ Contains a 60 page scholarly select bibliography of works relating to the history of the Soviet Union.
  3. ^ Covers tje period from the October Revolution through the Stalinist 1930s.
  4. ^ Covers Post-War period.
  5. ^ .A revised version was published in 1999 under the title "The Great Terror: A Reassessment" after Conquest was able to access the Soviet archives. His archival research confirmed most of what he had previously written.
  6. ^ See Trofim Lysenko and Lysenkoism.
  7. ^ a b The notes at the end of each essay (chapter) includes substantial bibliographic entries.
  8. ^ Originally published in three volumes by Oxford University Press (1954, 1959, 1963).
  9. ^ Stalinism and revisionist social historians.
  10. ^ Some catalogs/bibliographies list author's last name as Chlevnjuk.
  11. ^ Biography of Stalin with a significant focus on his relationship with his inner circle.
  12. ^ Memoir written in the form of fictional letters by Stalin's daughter, Svetlana Alliluyeva.
  13. ^ Second volume of memoirs written by Stalin's daughter, Svetlana Alliluyeva.
  14. ^ A work of documentary fiction created about wartime Leningrad, written by a survivor of the siege of Leningrad.
  15. ^ Original work published 1960.
  16. ^ The translation by H.T. Willetts is the only one that is based on the canonical Russian text and the only one authorized by Solzhenitsyn. See One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich. (1991). New York, NY: Farrar Straus & Giroux ISBN 978-0-00-271607-9.
  17. ^ Letters written by survivors of the Gulag.
  18. ^ Contains English language works only.
  19. ^ Bibliography on the social history of the Stalin era.
  20. ^ Good bibliography for historiography.
  21. ^ Bibliography of Stalin, his inner circle and the politics of the Stalinist era.
  22. ^ Bibliographies on the life of Stalin and Stalinism in the Soviet Union in general.
  23. ^ Contains only English language works. 3rd Edition has an updated (2016) bibliography with a specific section on the Stalin era.
  24. ^ See the "Sources" section for a significant listing of historical archives on the Stalinist era and interviews with survivors of Stalinism in the Soviet Union.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schmemann, Serge (January 8, 2015). "From Czarist Rubble, a Russian Autocrat Rises". The New York Times Book Review. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  2. ^ Fitzpatrick, Sheila (October 22, 2014). "Stalin: Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928 by Stephen Kotkin review – personality proves decisive". The Guardian. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  3. ^ Gessen, Keith (October 30, 2017). "How Stalin Became Stalinist". The New Yorker Book Review. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  4. ^ Lawrence, Mark Atwood (October 19, 2017). "A Portrait of Stalin in All His Murderous Contradictions". The New York Times Book Review. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
  5. ^ Breslauer, George W. (1985). "Rethinking the Soviet Experience: Politics and History Since 1917. By Stephen F. Cohen. New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1985". Slavic Review. 44 (4): 725–726. doi:10.2307/2498556. JSTOR 2498556.
  6. ^ Frank, Peter (1986). "Reviewed work: Rethinking the Soviet Experience. Politics and History since 1917, Stephen F. Cohen". Soviet Studies. 38 (3): 432–433. JSTOR 151705.
  7. ^ Meyer, Alfred G.; Heller, Mikhail; Nekrich, Aleksandr; Carlos, Phyllis B. (1988). "Utopia in Power: The History of the Soviet Union from 1917 to the Present". Russian Review. 47 (3): 344. doi:10.2307/130610. JSTOR 130610.
  8. ^ Dallin, Alexander (1988). "Utopia in Power: The History of the Soviet Union from 1917 to the Present. By Mikhail Heller and Aleksandr M. Nekrich. Translated by Phyllis B. Carlos. New York: Summit Books, 1986. 877 pp. $24.95, cloth". Slavic Review. 47 (2): 319–320. doi:10.2307/2498472. JSTOR 2498472.
  9. ^ Ragsdale, Hugh (1989). "Reviewed work: The First Socialist Society: A History of the Soviet Union from Within, Geoffrey Hosking". Russian History. 16 (1): 98–99. JSTOR 24657684.
  10. ^ Hagen, Mark Von (1987). "Soviet History - the First Socialist Society: A History of the Soviet Union from Within. By Geoffrey Hosking. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1985. 527 pp. - Russia: A History of the Soviet Period. By Woodford Mc Clellan. Englewood Cliffs, N.J.: Prentice-Hall, 1986". Slavic Review. 46: 118–122. doi:10.2307/2498626. JSTOR 2498626.
  11. ^ Viola, Lynne; Hosking, Geoffrey (1986). "The First Socialist Society: A History of the Soviet Union from within". Russian Review. 45 (3): 340. doi:10.2307/130140. JSTOR 130140.
  12. ^ McClellan, Woodford (1986). "The Soviet Colossus: A History of the USSR. By Michael Kort. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1985. Xiii, 318 pp. - Russia: The Roots of Confrontation. By Robert V. Daniels. Foreword by Edwin O. Reischauer. American Foreign Policy Library (Edited by Edwin O. Reischauer). Cambridge and London: Harvard University Press, 1985. Xv, 411 pp". Slavic Review. 45 (3): 552–554. doi:10.2307/2499061. JSTOR 2499061.
  13. ^ Getty, J. Arch (2007). "The Soviet Century . By Moshe Lewin. London: Verso, 2005". The Journal of Modern History. 79: 225–226. doi:10.1086/517582.
  14. ^ Gregory, Paul (2005). "Reviewed work: The Soviet Century, Moshe Lewin". The Journal of Economic History. 65 (3): 864–867. JSTOR 3875024.
  15. ^ "Reviewed work: The Soviet Tragedy: A History of Socialism in Russia, 1917-1991, Martin Malia". The Wilson Quarterly (1976-). 18 (4): 98–99. 1994. JSTOR 40259142.
  16. ^ Kotsonis, Yanni (1999). "The Ideology of Martin Malia". The Russian Review. 58 (1): 124–130. doi:10.1111/0036-0341.611999061. JSTOR 2679709.
  17. ^ Hornsby, Robert (2008). "Reviewed work: The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union, Martin McCauley". Europe-Asia Studies. 60 (5): 863–864. JSTOR 20451552.
  18. ^ Rosefielde, Steven (2008). "Reviewed work: The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union, Martin McCauley". The Russian Review. 67 (2): 355–356. JSTOR 20620785.
  19. ^ Smith, Mark B. (2009). "Reviewed work: The Cambridge History of Russia. Volume 3: The Twentieth Century, Ronald Grigor Suny". The Slavonic and East European Review. 87 (3): 564–567. JSTOR 40650434.
  20. ^ Nathans, Benjamin (2009). "The Cambridge History of Russia. Volume 3, the Twentieth Century. Edited by Ronald Grigor Suny. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2007". The Journal of Modern History. 81 (3): 756–758. doi:10.1086/649129.
  21. ^ Uldriks, Teddy J.; Antonov-Ovseyenko, Anton (1983). "The Time of Stalin: Portrait of a Tyranny". Russian Review. 42 (3): 333. doi:10.2307/129832. JSTOR 129832.
  22. ^ Barghoorn, Frederick; Armstrong, John A. (1962). "The Politics of Totalitarianism". Russian Review. 21 (2): 184. doi:10.2307/126380. JSTOR 126380.
  23. ^ Legvold, Robert (2017). "Review: Russia in Revolution: An Empire in Crisis, 1890 to 1928; Caught in the Revolution; Was Revolution Inevitable? Turning Points of the Russian Revolution". Foreign Affairs. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  24. ^ Fedyashin, A. (2017). "Review: S. A. Smith, Russia in Revolution: An Empire in Crisis, 1890 to 1928". European History Quarterly. 47 (4): 787–789. doi:10.1177/0265691417729639as.
  25. ^ Lohr, E. (2017). "Book Review: The "Russian" Civil Wars, 1916–1926: Ten Years that Shook the World. By Jonathan D. Smele". Slavic Review. 74 (4): 1123–1124. doi:10.1017/slr.2017.321.
  26. ^ Wade, Rex A. (2016). "Reviewed Work: The 'Russian' Civil Wars, 1916–1926: Ten Years That Shook the World by Smele, Jonathan D.". The Slavonic and East European Review. 94 (4): 760–762. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.94.4.0760. JSTOR 10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.94.4.0760.
  27. ^ Kovalyova, Natalia (2017). "Book Review: The 'Russian' Civil Wars 1916–1926. Ten Years That Shook the World". Europe-Asia Studies. 69 (3): 533–535. doi:10.1080/09668136.2017.1299930.
  28. ^ Kroner, Anthony (2017). "Book Review: The 'Russian' Civil Wars 1916–1926: Ten Years That Shook the World". Revolutionary Russia. 30 (1): 142–145. doi:10.1080/09546545.2017.1305540.
  29. ^ Campbell, John C.; Tucker, Robert C. (1991). "Stalin in Power: The Revolution from above, 1928-1941". Foreign Affairs. 70 (3): 173. doi:10.2307/20044866. JSTOR 20044866.
  30. ^ Adams, Jan S. (1994). "Stalin in Power: The Revolution from Above, 1928-1941. By Robert C. Tucker. New York: W.W. Norton, 1990. Xv, 707 pp. Bibliography. Index. Plates". Slavic Review. 53: 252–253. doi:10.2307/2500355. JSTOR 2500355.
  31. ^ McCagg, William O. (1983). "Postwar Soviet Politics: The Fall of Zhdanov and the Defeat of Moderation, 1946–53. By Werner G. Hahn. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press, 1982". Slavic Review. 42 (2): 293–294. doi:10.2307/2497537. JSTOR 2497537.
  32. ^ McCauley, Martin (1983). "Reviewed work: Postwar Soviet Politics: The Fall of Zhdanov and the Defeat of Moderation, 1946-53, Werner G. Hahn". The Slavonic and East European Review. 61 (4): 631–632. JSTOR 4208783.
  33. ^ a b c Suny, Ronald Grigor (1998). "Reviewed work: Popular Opinion in Stalin's Russia: Terror, Propaganda and Dissent, 1934-1941., Sarah Davies". Slavic Review. 57 (2): 459–460. doi:10.2307/2501888. JSTOR 2501888.
  34. ^ a b c Kenney, Padraic (1998). "Reviewed work: Popular Opinion in Stalin's Russia: Terror, Propaganda and Dissent, 1934-1941, Sarah Davies". Russian History. 25 (3): 353–354. JSTOR 24658993.
  35. ^ a b c Taylor, Richard (1998). "Reviewed work: Popular Opinion in Stalin's Russia. Terror, Propaganda and Dissent, 1934-1941, Sarah Davies". The Slavonic and East European Review. 76 (3): 565–566. JSTOR 4212707.
  36. ^ a b c Lenoe, Matthew (1999). "Book Reviews Popular Opinion in Stalin's Russia: Terror, Propaganda, and Dissent, 1934‐1941. By Sarah Davies. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1997". The Journal of Modern History. 71 (3): 789–791. doi:10.1086/235358. JSTOR 10.1086/235358.
  37. ^ Viola, Lynne (2008). "Reviewed Work: The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin's Russia by Orlando Figes". Slavic Review. 67 (2): 440–443. doi:10.1017/S0037677900023640. JSTOR 27652854.
  38. ^ Perks, Rob (2008). "Reviewed Work: The Whisperers: Private Life in Stalin's Russia by Orlando Figes". Oral History. 36 (2): 107–108. JSTOR 40179997.
  39. ^ Rossman, J. J. (2001). "Reviewed Work: Everyday Stalinism. Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Soviet Russia in the 1930s by Sheila Fitzpatrick". The Journal of Modern History. 73 (3): 722–724. doi:10.1086/339084. JSTOR 10.1086/339084.
  40. ^ Siegelbaum, L. H. (1999). "Reviewed Work: Everyday Stalinism: Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Soviet Russia in the 1930s by Sheila Fitzpatrick". Slavic Review. 56 (4): 921–922. doi:10.2307/2697237. JSTOR 2697237.
  41. ^ Fedotova, Oksana (1999). "Reviewed Work: Everyday Stalinism. Ordinary Life in Extraordinary Times: Soviet Russia in the 1930s by Sheila Fitzpatrick". Russian History. 26 (1): 104–105. JSTOR 24659264.
  42. ^ Johnson, Emily D. (2007). "Reviewed work: Everyday Life in Early Soviet Russia: Taking the Revolution Inside, Christina Kiaer, Eric Naiman". The Slavic and East European Journal. 51 (1): 159–161. JSTOR 20459439.
  43. ^ Gorsuch, Anne E. (2007). "Reviewed work: Everyday Life in Early Soviet Russia: Taking the Revolution Inside, Christina Kiaer, Eric Naiman". Slavic Review. 66 (2): 358–360. doi:10.2307/20060266. JSTOR 20060266.
  44. ^ White, J. D. (2008). "Reviewed work: Everyday Life in Early Soviet Russia: Taking the Revolution Inside, Christina Kiaer, Eric Naiman". The Slavonic and East European Review. 86 (4): 736–738. JSTOR 25479288.
  45. ^ Szporluk, Roman; Barber, John (1982). "Soviet Historians in Crisis, 1928-1932". Russian Review. 41 (4): 492. doi:10.2307/129870. JSTOR 129870.
  46. ^ Thurston, Gary (1984). "Reviewed work: Soviet Historians in Crisis, 1928-1932, John Barber". The Journal of Modern History. 56 (1): 195–196. doi:10.1086/242664. JSTOR 1878225.
  47. ^ Gilburd, Eleonory (2013). "Moscow, the Fourth Rome: Stalinism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Evolution of Soviet Culture, 1931–1941. By Katerina Clark. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2011". The Journal of Modern History. 85 (3): 735–738. doi:10.1086/670916. JSTOR 10.1086/670916.
  48. ^ Nesbet, Anne (2009). "Moscow, the Fourth Rome: Stalinism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Evolution of Soviet Culture, 1931-1941. By Katerina Clark. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2011. Ix, 420". Slavic Review. 72 (2): 364–367. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.72.2.0364.
  49. ^ Jackson, Matthew Jesse (2015). "Reviewed work: Moscow, the Fourth Rome: Stalinism, Cosmopolitanism, and the Evolution of Soviet Culture, 1931–1941, Katerina Clark". The Slavic and East European Journal. 59 (1): 145–146. JSTOR 44739599.
  50. ^ Alexandra k. Harrington (2011). "Anna Akhmatova's Biographical Myth-Making: Tragedy and Melodrama". The Slavonic and East European Review. 89 (3): 455. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.89.3.0455.
  51. ^ Moses, Joel C.; Fitzpatrick, Sheila (1979). "Cultural Revolution in Russia, 1928-1931". Russian Review. 38: 99. doi:10.2307/129092. JSTOR 129092.
  52. ^ Nove, Alec (1979). "Cultural Revolution in Russia, 1928-1931. Edited by Sheila Fitzpatrick. Studies of the Russian Institute, Columbia University. Bloomington and London: Indiana University Press, 1978". Slavic Review. 38: 114–115. doi:10.2307/2497240. JSTOR 2497240.
  53. ^ Kelly, Catriona (1994). "Reviewed work: The Cultural Front: Power and Culture in Revolutionary Russia, Sheila Fitzpatrick". The Slavonic and East European Review. 72 (2): 355–357. JSTOR 4211523.
  54. ^ Rowney, Don K. (1995). "Reviewed work: The Cultural Front: Power and Culture in Revolutionary Russia, Sheila Fitzpatrick". The Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 25 (4): 713–715. doi:10.2307/205823. JSTOR 205823.
  55. ^ Goldman, Wendy (1995). "Reviewed work: The Cultural Front: Power and Culture in Revolutionary Russia, Sheila Fitzpatrick". Russian History. 22 (3): 329–331. JSTOR 24658457.
  56. ^ Kotkin, Stephen (1995). "Reviewed work: The Cultural Front: Power and Culture in Revolutionary Russia., Sheila Fitzpatrick". Slavic Review. 54 (2): 475–476. doi:10.2307/2501665. JSTOR 2501665.
  57. ^ Rittersporn, Gabor Tamas (1991). "Reviewed work: The Culture of the Stalin Period, Hans Gunther". Soviet Studies. 43 (4): 779–780. JSTOR 152314.
  58. ^ Nepomnyashchy, Catharine Theimer (1990). "Reviewed work: The Culture of the Stalin Period, Hans Günther". Russian History. 17 (4): 469–471. doi:10.1163/187633190X00246. JSTOR 24656414.
  59. ^ Studer, Brigitte (2008). "Revolution on My Mind: Writing a Diary under Stalin. By Jochen Hellbeck. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2006". The Journal of Modern History. 80 (2): 481–483. doi:10.1086/591604.
  60. ^ Petrone, Karen (2007). "Reviewed work: Revolution on My Mind: Writing a Diary under Stalin, Jochen Hellbeck". Social History. 32 (2): 215–217. JSTOR 4287429.
  61. ^ Crockatt, Richard (1996). "Reviewed work: The Long War: The Intellectual People's Front and Anti-Stalinism, 1930-1940, Judy Kutulas". Social History. 21 (3): 387–388. JSTOR 4286380.
  62. ^ Isserman, Maurice (1997). "Reviewed work: The Long War: The Intellectual People's Front and Anti-Stalinism, 1930-1940, Judy Kutulas". International Labor and Working-Class History (52): 171–172. doi:10.1017/S0147547900007080. JSTOR 27672420.
  63. ^ Steinberg, Mark D. (1995). "Reviewed work: Russian Popular Culture: Entertainment and Society since 1900, Richard Stites, Mary McAuley". The Journal of Modern History. 67 (1): 251–253. doi:10.1086/245089. JSTOR 2125055.
  64. ^ Nesbet, Anne; Stites, Richard (1994). "Russian Popular Culture: Entertainment and Society since 1900". Russian Review. 53 (3): 461. doi:10.2307/131226. JSTOR 131226.
  65. ^ Youngblood, Denise J.; Strong, John W. (1992). "Essays on Revolutionary Culture and Stalinism: Selected Papers from the Third World Congress for Soviet and East European Studies". Russian Review. 51: 132. doi:10.2307/131271. JSTOR 131271.
  66. ^ Shaw, Claire (2014). "Reviewed work: Making the Soviet Intelligentsia: Universities and Intellectual Life under Stalin and Khrushchev, Benjamin Tromly". The Russian Review. 73 (4): 655–656. JSTOR 43662172.
  67. ^ Kozlov, Denis (2015). "Making the Soviet Intelligentsia: Universities and Intellectual Life under Stalin and Khrushchev. By Benjamin Tromly. New Studies in European History. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014". Slavic Review. 74 (3): 665–666. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.74.3.665.
  68. ^ Jones, Polly (2015). "Making the Soviet Intelligentsia: Universities and Intellectual Life under Stalin and Khrushchev. By Benjamin Tromly. New Studies in European History. Edited by Peter Baldwin et al.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2014". The Journal of Modern History. 87 (4): 1021–1023. doi:10.1086/683597.
  69. ^ Matthews, Mervyn (1981). "Reviewed work: Education and Social Mobility in the Soviet Union, 1921-1934, Sheila Fitzpatrick". The Slavonic and East European Review. 59 (3): 462–463. JSTOR 4208359.
  70. ^ Vucinich, Wayne S. (1981). "Reviewed work: Education and Social Mobility in the Soviet Union 1921-1934, Sheila Fitzpatrick". The Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science. 455: 188–189. doi:10.1177/000271628145500133. JSTOR 1044097.
  71. ^ Balzer, Harley (1980). "Reviewed work: Education and Social Mobility in the Soviet Union, 1921-1934, Sheila Fitzpatrick". Russian History. 7 (3): 397–398. JSTOR 24652456.
  72. ^ Himka, John-Paul (1997). "The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church and the Soviet State (1939-1950). By Bohdan Rostyslav Bociurkiw. Edmonton: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies Press, 1996. Xvi, 310pp. Index. Plates. Hard bound". Slavic Review. 56: 136–138. doi:10.2307/2500669. JSTOR 2500669.
  73. ^ Liber, George O. (1998). "Book Reviews The Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church and the Soviet State, 1939–1950. By Bohdan Rostyslav  Bociurkiw. Edmondton and Toronto: Canadian Institute of Ukrainian Studies Press, 1996". The Journal of Modern History. 70 (3): 756–757. doi:10.1086/235166.
  74. ^ Boobbyer, P. C. (2004). "Reviewed work: Stalin's Holy War: Religion, Nationalism and Alliance Politics, 1941-1945, Steven Merritt Miner". The Slavonic and East European Review. 82 (3): 773–774. JSTOR 4213985.
  75. ^ Roslof, Edward E. (2004). "Stalin's Holy War: Religion, Nationalism, and Alliance Politics, 1941-1945. By Steven Merritt Miner. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2003". Slavic Review. 63 (2): 415–416. doi:10.2307/3185767. JSTOR 3185767.
  76. ^ Dunn, Dennis J. (2004). "Reviewed work: Stalin's Holy War: Religion, Nationalism, and Alliance Politics, 1941-1945, Steven Merritt Miner". The Catholic Historical Review. 90 (1): 154–155. doi:10.1353/cat.2004.0013. JSTOR 25026557.
  77. ^ Maguire, Robert A.; Conquest, Robert (1962). "The Pasternak Affair: Courage of Genius". Russian Review. 21 (3): 292. doi:10.2307/126724. JSTOR 126724.
  78. ^ Struve, Gleb; Conquest, Robert (1963). "The Pasternak Affair: Courage of Genius". The Slavic and East European Journal. 7 (2): 183. doi:10.2307/304612. JSTOR 304612.
  79. ^ Uhde, Jan (1974). "Reviewed work: Alexander Dovzhenko: The Poet as Filmmaker, MARCO CARYNNK". Canadian Slavonic Papers / Revue Canadienne des Slavistes. 16 (3): 497–499. JSTOR 40866781.
  80. ^ Rosen, Philip; Carynnyk, Marco; Levaco, Ronald (1976). "Alexander Dovzhenko, the Poet as Filmmaker: Selected Writings". Cinema Journal. 16: 76. doi:10.2307/1225451. JSTOR 1225451.
  81. ^ Brumfield, William (1977). "In Stalin's Time: Middleclass Values in Soviet Fiction. By Vera S. Dunham. Introduction by Jerry F. Hough. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1976". Slavic Review. 36: 155–156. doi:10.2307/2494720. JSTOR 2494720.
  82. ^ Kassof, Allen H. (1978). "Reviewed work: In Stalin's Time: Middleclass Values in Soviet Fiction., Vera Dunham". American Journal of Sociology. 84 (1): 192–194. doi:10.1086/226751. JSTOR 2777989.
  83. ^ Goldstein, Darra (1993). "Reviewed work: The Total Art of Stalinism: Avant-garde, Aesthetic Dictatorship, and Beyond, Boris Groys, Charles Rougle". Russian History. 20 (1/4): 367–368. doi:10.1163/187633193X00784. JSTOR 24657360.
  84. ^ Nicholas, Mary A.; Groys, Boris; Rougle, Charles (1993). "The Total Art of Stalinism: Avant-Garde, Aesthetic Dictatorship, and beyond". The Slavic and East European Journal. 37 (4): 602. doi:10.2307/308486. JSTOR 308486.
  85. ^ Swiderski, Edward M. (1977). "Reviewed work: Soviet Socialist Realism: Origins and Theory, C. Vaughan James". Studies in Soviet Thought. 17 (3): 247–249. doi:10.1007/BF00835248. JSTOR 20098748.
  86. ^ Swayze, Harold; James, C. Vaughan (1974). "Soviet Socialist Realism: Origins and Theory". Russian Review. 33 (4): 443. doi:10.2307/128188. JSTOR 128188.
  87. ^ Hallett, Richard; Maguire, Robert A. (1969). "Red Virgin Soil. Soviet Literature in the 1920s". Russian Review. 28 (2): 241. doi:10.2307/127520. JSTOR 127520.
  88. ^ McLean, Hugh (1969). "Red Virgin Soil: Soviet Literature in the 1920's. By Robert A. Maguire. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1968". Slavic Review. 28 (2): 356–358. doi:10.2307/2493256. JSTOR 2493256.
  89. ^ Conliffe, Mark; Maguire, Robert A. (2001). "Red Virgin Soil: Soviet Literature in the 1920's". The Slavic and East European Journal. 45: 131. doi:10.2307/3086424. JSTOR 3086424.
  90. ^ Laursen, Eric (2016). "Automatic for the Masses: The Death of the Author and the Birth of Socialist Realism. By Petrov Petre M.. Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 2015". Slavic Review. 75 (3): 730–732. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.75.3.0730.
  91. ^ Możejko, Edward; Robin, Régine; Porter, Catherine (1994). "Socialist Realism: An Impossible Aesthetic". World Literature Today. 68: 161. doi:10.2307/40149999. JSTOR 40149999.
  92. ^ Taubman, Jane A. (1994). "Reviewed work: Socialist Realism: An Impossible Aesthetic, Regine Robin, Catherine Porter". Modern Fiction Studies. 40 (1): 197–199. doi:10.1353/mfs.0.0887. JSTOR 26284300.
  93. ^ Ruder, Cynthia A.; Robin, Regine; Porter, Catherine (1994). "Socialist Realism: An Impossible Aesthetic". The Slavic and East European Journal. 38: 178. doi:10.2307/308561. JSTOR 308561.
  94. ^ Lary, Nikita M. (1986). "Soviet Cinema in the Silent Era, 1918-1935. By Denise J. Youngblood. Studies in Cinema, no. 35. Ann Arbor, Mich.: UMI Research Press, 1985. Xi, 336 pp. Figures. Illustrations. Photographs. Tables. $44.95, cloth". Slavic Review. 45 (2): 424–425. doi:10.2307/2499296. JSTOR 2499296.
  95. ^ Fell, John (1986). "Soviet Cinema in the Silent Era, 1918-1935 Denise J. Youngblood". Film Quarterly. 39 (4): 61–62. doi:10.2307/1212511. JSTOR 1212511.
  96. ^ Huber, Joan; Lapidus, Gail Warshofsky (1979). "Women in Soviet Society: Equality, Development, and Social Change". Social Forces. 57 (4): 1428. doi:10.2307/2577299. JSTOR 2577299.
  97. ^ Jancar, Barbara W. (1979). "Reviewed work: Women in Soviet Society: Equality, Development and Social Change, Gail Warshofsky Lapidus". Soviet Studies. 31 (4): 603–605. JSTOR 150925.
  98. ^ "Gulag: A History, by Anne Applebaum (Doubleday)". The 2004 Pulitzer Prize Winner in General Nonfiction. 2004. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
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  100. ^ Pease (2013). The Polish Review. 58 (4): 105. doi:10.5406/polishreview.58.4.0105. Missing or empty |title= (help)
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  102. ^ Kuzio, Taras (2018). "Red Famine. Stalin's War on Ukraine". Europe-Asia Studies. 70 (8): 1334–1335. doi:10.1080/09668136.2018.1520510.
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  104. ^ Hochschild, Adam (October 18, 2017). "Stalinist Crimes in Ukraine That Resonate Today". New York Times Book Review. Retrieved 1 February 2020.
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  106. ^ Katz, Elena (2012). "Review: Death and Redemption: The Gulag and the Shaping of Soviet Society". Europe-Asia Studies. 64 (7): 1334–1335. doi:10.1080/09668136.2012.701389.
  107. ^ Brown, Kate (2012). "Reviewed Work: Death and Redemption: The Gulag and the Shaping of Soviet Society by Steven A. Barnes". Slavic Review. 71 (4): 948–949. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.71.4.0948. JSTOR 10.5612/slavicreview.71.4.0948.
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  109. ^ Hill, Alexander (2016). "Review of MERSH: Stalin's Secret Weapon: Soviet Military Counterintelligence in WWII". Intelligence and National Security. 31 (3): 447–448. doi:10.1080/02684527.2013.862967.
  110. ^ a b Smith, George B. (1987). "Reviewed Work: The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine. by Robert Conquest". The Journal of Politics. 49 (3): 904–905. doi:10.2307/2131299. JSTOR 2131299.
  111. ^ a b Kosiński, L. A. (1987). "Reviewed Work: The Harvest of Sorrow: Soviet Collectivization and the Terror-Famine by Robert Conquest". Population and Development Review. 13 (1): 149–153. doi:10.2307/1972127. JSTOR 1972127.
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  115. ^ a b Gregory, Paul (2006). "The Years of Hunger: Soviet Agriculture, 1931–1933. By R. W. Davies and Stephen G. Wheatcroft. The Industrialization of Soviet Russia, number 5. Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004". The Journal of Modern History. 78 (2): 539–541. doi:10.1086/505849. JSTOR 10.1086/505849.
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  117. ^ a b Getty, J. Arch (2004). "Reviewed Work: Stalin's Loyal Executioner: People's Commissar Nikolai Ezhov, 1895–1940 by Marc Jansen, Nikita Petrov". The Journal of Modern History. 76 (3): 738–739. doi:10.1086/425487. JSTOR 10.1086/425487.
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  119. ^ Mawdsley, Evan (1998). "Reviewed work: The Lesser Terror: Soviet State Security, 1939-1953, Michael Parrish". Europe-Asia Studies. 50 (4): 742–743. JSTOR 153800.
  120. ^ Thurston, Robert; Parrish, Michael (1997). "The Lesser Terror: Soviet State Security, 1939-1953". Russian Review. 56 (4): 609. doi:10.2307/131586. JSTOR 131586.
  121. ^ Cohen, Stephen (June 16, 1974). "Review: The Gulag Archipelago". The New York Times. Retrieved 6 February 2020.
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  123. ^ Gregory, Paul R. (1989). "Reviewed work: Rural Russia under the New Regime, Orlando Figes". Agricultural History. 63 (3): 116–118. JSTOR 3743750.
  124. ^ Channon, John (1992). "Reviewed work: Rural Russia under the New Regime, V. P. Danilov, Orlando Figes". The Agricultural History Review. 40 (2): 188–190. JSTOR 40274908.
  125. ^ Moon, David (2007). "Reviewed work: The War against the Peasantry 1927-1930: The Tragedy of the Soviet Countryside, L. Viola, V. P. Danilov, N. A. Ivnitskii, D. Kozlov". The Slavonic and East European Review. 85 (3): 585–587. JSTOR 25479122.
  126. ^ Merl, Stephan (2006). "The War against the Peasantry, 1927-1930: The Tragedy of the Soviet Countryside. By Lynne Viola, V. P. Danilov, N. A. Ivnitskii, and Denis Kozlov. Trans. Steven Shabad. Annals of Communism. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2005". Slavic Review. 65 (4): 828–829. doi:10.2307/4148486. JSTOR 4148486.
  127. ^ a b "The Industrialisation of Soviet Russia, vol. 1: The Socialist Offensive: The Collectivisation of Soviet Agriculture, 1929–1930. By R. W. Davies. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1980". doi:10.2307/2497035. JSTOR 2497035. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  128. ^ Johnson, R. (1996). "Stalin's Peasants: Resistance and Survival in the Russian Village after Collectivization". Slavic Review. 55 (1): 186–187. doi:10.2307/2500998. JSTOR 2500998.
  129. ^ Orlovsky, D. (1996). "Review: Stalin's Peasants: Resistance and Survival in the Russian Village after Collectivization". International Labor and Working-Class History. 50: 174–177. doi:10.1017/S0147547900013363.
  130. ^ Richardson, William (1994). "Review: Stalin's Peasants: Resistance and Survival in the Russian Village After Collectivization". History: Reviews of New Books. 23 (1): 36–37. doi:10.1080/03612759.1994.9950930.
  131. ^ Merl, Stephan (1995). "Reviewed Work: Stalin's Peasants: Resistance and Survival in the Russian Village After Collectivization by Sheila Fitzpatrick". Russian History. 22 (3): 326–328. JSTOR 24658456.
  132. ^ McCauley, Martin (1973). "Reviewed work: The Awkward Class: Political Sociology of Peasantry in a Developing Society: Russia 1910-1925, Teodor Shanin". The Slavonic and East European Review. 51 (123): 305–306. JSTOR 4206719.
  133. ^ Moscowitz, Norman A. (1973). "The Awkward Class: Political Sociology of Peasantry in a Developing Society: Russia, 1910-1925. By Teodor Shanin. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1972". Slavic Review. 32 (3): 621. doi:10.2307/2495436. JSTOR 2495436.
  134. ^ Pethybridge, Roger (1976). "Reviews : Teodor Shanin, the Awkward Class Political Sociology of Peasantry in a Developing Society. Russia 1910-1925, Oxford, Clarendon Press of Oxford University Press, 1972. Xviii+ 253 pp. £4.50". European Studies Review. 6 (2): 269–271. doi:10.1177/026569147600600211.
  135. ^ McCauley, Martin (1971). "Reviewed work: A Century of Russian Agriculture: From Alexander II to Khrushchev, L. Volin". The Slavonic and East European Review. 49 (117): 620–621. JSTOR 4206465.
  136. ^ Lewin, Moshe (1972). "Reviewed work: A Century of Russian Agriculture: From Alexander II to Khrushchev., Lazar Volin". Journal of Economic Literature. 10 (1): 97–99. JSTOR 2720922.
  137. ^ Hudson, Hugh D. (1995). "Reviewed Work: Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization. by Stephen Kotkin". Slavic Review. 54 (4): 1096–1097. doi:10.2307/2501463. JSTOR 2501463.
  138. ^ Harris, James R. (1997). "Reviewed Work: Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization by Stephen Kotkin". Russian History. 24 (3): 364–366. JSTOR 24658446.
  139. ^ Marker, Gary (1996). "Reviewed Work: Magnetic Mountain: Stalinism as a Civilization by Stephen Kotkin". The Slavic and East European Journal. 40 (4): 774–775. doi:10.2307/310128. JSTOR 310128.
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  141. ^ Munting, Roger; Kuromiya, Kiroaki (1989). "Stalin's Industrial Revolution: Politics and Workers, 1928-1932". The Economic History Review. 42 (3): 429. doi:10.2307/2596467. JSTOR 2596467.
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  143. ^ Cox, Terry (1996). "Reviewed work: Making Workers Soviet: Power, Class and Identity, Lewis H. Siegelbaum, Ronald Grigor Suny". Europe-Asia Studies. 48 (7): 1260–1261. JSTOR 153126.
  144. ^ Clark, Charles E. (1995). "Reviewed work: Making Workers Soviet: Power, Class, and Identity, Lewis H. Siegelbaum, Ronald Grigor Suny". Russian History. 22 (2): 236–238. JSTOR 24657816.
  145. ^ Ellison, Herbert J. (1962). "Robert V. Daniels, the Conscience of the Revolution: Communist Opposition in Soviet Russia. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1960". Slavic Review. 21: 162–163. doi:10.2307/3000554. JSTOR 3000554.
  146. ^ Barghoorn, F. C. (1961). "Reviewed work: The Conscience of the Revolution: Communist Opposition in Soviet Russia, Robert Vincent Daniels". The Journal of Modern History. 33 (4): 466–467. doi:10.1086/238969. JSTOR 1877273.
  147. ^ Dallin, Alexander; Daniels, Robert Vincent (1961). "The Conscience of the Revolution: Communist Opposition in Soviet Russia". Political Science Quarterly. 76 (2): 304. doi:10.2307/2146231. hdl:2027/uva.x000379449. JSTOR 2146231.
  148. ^ Munk, Frank; Daniels, Robert Vincent (1961). "The Conscience of the Revolution: Communist Opposition in Soviet Russia". The Western Political Quarterly. 14 (3): 778. doi:10.2307/444301. hdl:2027/uva.x000379449. JSTOR 444301.
  149. ^ Krammer, A. (2010). "Reviewed Work: Beyond Totalitarianism: Stalinism and Nazism Compared by Michael Geyer, Sheila Fitzpatrick". German Studies Review. 33 (2): 431–432. JSTOR 20787947.
  150. ^ Stibbe, M. (2011). "Reviewed Works: Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler: The Age of Social Catastrophe by Robert Gellately; Beyond Totalitarianism: Stalinism and Nazism Compared by Michael Geyer, Sheila Fitzpatrick; Barbarism and Civilization: A History of Europe in Our Time by Bernard Wasserstein". The Journal of Modern History. 83 (2): 387–394. doi:10.1086/659158. JSTOR 10.1086/659158.
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  152. ^ Brandenberger, D. (2013). "Book Review: The Stalin Cult: A Study in the Alchemy of Power". Slavic Review. 72 (1): 180–181. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.72.1.0180.
  153. ^ Walton, C. D. (2009). "A Review of "Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler: The Age of Social Catastrophe"". Comparative Strategy. 29 (2): 190–192. doi:10.1080/01495930902799814.
  154. ^ Tismaneanu, V. (2009). "Book Review: Lenin, Stalin, and Hitler: The Age of Social Catastrophe". Kritika: Explorations in Russian and Eurasian History. 10 (3): 724–729. doi:10.1353/kri.0.0100.
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  156. ^ Stites, Richard (1999). "Reviewed Work: Iconography of Power: Soviet Political Posters under Lenin and Stalin. by Victoria E.Bonnell". American Journal of Sociology. 104 (5): 1589–1591. doi:10.1086/210214. JSTOR 10.1086/210214.
  157. ^ Laursen, E. (2013). "Reviewed Work: Propaganda State in Crisis: Soviet Ideology, Indoctrination, and Terror under Stalin, 1927–1941 by David Brandenberger". The Slavic and East European Journal. 57 (1): 120–121. JSTOR 24642424.
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  159. ^ Harasymiw, Bohdan (1990). "Reviewed work: Revolution from Abroad: The Soviet Conquest of Poland's Western Ukraine and Western Belorussia, Jan T. Gross". The Slavonic and East European Review. 68 (1): 157–159. JSTOR 4210217.
  160. ^ Resis, Albert (2003). "Reviewed work: Revolution from Abroad: The Soviet Conquest of Poland's Western Ukraine and Western Belorussia, Jan T. Gross". Europe-Asia Studies. 55 (5): 812–813. JSTOR 3594579.
  161. ^ August, Samie (2017). "Book Review: Despite cultures: early Soviet rule in Tajikistan". Central Asian Survey. 36 (2): 287–289. doi:10.1080/02634937.2017.1296271.
  162. ^ Khalid, A. (2017). "Book Review: Despite Cultures: Early Soviet Rule in Tajikistan". Slavic Review. 76 (4): 1125–1127. doi:10.1017/slr.2017.323.
  163. ^ Breyfogle, Nicholas B. (2009). "Reviewed work: The Ghost of Freedom: A History of the Caucasus, Charles King". The American Historical Review. 114 (4): 1187–1188. doi:10.1086/ahr.114.4.1187. JSTOR 23883127.
  164. ^ Weiner, Amir (2000). "Reviewed work: Freedom and Terror in the Donbas: A Ukrainian-Russian Borderland, 1870s-1990s, Hiroaki Kuromiya". The Russian Review. 59 (2): 304–306. JSTOR 2679778.
  165. ^ Argenbright, Robert (1999). "Reviewed work: FREEDOM AND TERROR IN THE DONBAS: A UKRAINIAN-RUSSIAN BORDERLAND, 1870s-1990s, Hiroaki Kuromiya". Harvard Ukrainian Studies. 23 (3/4): 203–205. JSTOR 41036801.
  166. ^ Bilocerkowycz, Jaroslaw; Marples, David R. (1994). "Stalinism in Ukraine in the 1940s". Russian Review. 53: 149. doi:10.2307/131324. JSTOR 131324.
  167. ^ Rywkin, Michael (1991). "Soviet Disunion: A History of the Nationalities Problem in the USSR. By Bohdan Nahaylo and Victor Swoboda. London: Hamish Hamilton, 1990. Xvi, 432 pp". Slavic Review. 50 (4): 1036–1037. doi:10.2307/2500505. JSTOR 2500505.
  168. ^ Pribic, Rado; Nahaylo, Bohdan; Swoboda, Victor (1991). "Soviet Disunion: A History of the Nationalities Problem in the USSR". Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 22 (2): 330. doi:10.2307/205888. JSTOR 205888.
  169. ^ Baberowski, J. (2005). "Book Review: Veiled Empire: Gender and Power in Stalinist Central Asia". Slavic Review. 64 (2): 437–439. doi:10.2307/3650020. JSTOR 3650020.
  170. ^ Kamp, M. (2005). "Book Review: Veiled Empire: Gender & Power in Stalinist Central Asia". Comparative Studies in Society and History. 47 (4): 894–895. doi:10.1017/S001041750522039X.
  171. ^ Legvold, Robert (2016). "Reviewed work: The Gates of Europe: A History of Ukraine, SERHII PLOKHY". Foreign Affairs. 95 (1): 180. JSTOR 43946667.
  172. ^ Tasar, Eren (2011). "Reviewed work: Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930–1966, Paul Stronski". Social History. 36 (4): 526–528. doi:10.1080/03071022.2011.620300. JSTOR 23072673.
  173. ^ Smith, Mark B. (2011). "Reviewed work: Tashkent: Forging a Soviet City, 1930-1966, Paul Stronski". Russian Review. 70 (3): 529. JSTOR 41290004.
  174. ^ Spector, Sherman D. (1974). "Expansion and Coexistence: Soviet Foreign Policy, 1917–1973". History: Reviews of New Books. 2 (10): 237. doi:10.1080/03612759.1974.9946570.
  175. ^ Munting, Roger (1999). "Reviewed work: The Soviet Economy in Turmoil, 1929-1930, R. W. Davies". The Slavonic and East European Review. 77 (3): 565–566. JSTOR 4212935.
  176. ^ Gregory, Paul R. (1990). "Reviewed work: The Soviet Economy in Turmoil, 1929-1930., R. W. Davies". The Journal of Economic History. 50 (3): 744–745. doi:10.1017/S0022050700037499. JSTOR 2122851.
  177. ^ Legvold, Robert (2004). "Book Review: Cold Peace: Stalin and the Soviet Ruling Circle, 1945-1953". Foreign Affairs. 83 (3): 151. doi:10.2307/20034014. JSTOR 20034014.
  178. ^ Csaba, László (2003). "Reviewed work: The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Economy: An Economic History of the USSR from 1945, Philip Hanson". Europe-Asia Studies. 55 (6): 950–952. JSTOR 3594594.
  179. ^ Katz, Mark N. (1994). "Black Earth, Red Star: A History of Soviet Security Policy, 1917-1991. By R. Craig Nation. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1991". Slavic Review. 53 (2): 610. doi:10.2307/2501355. JSTOR 2501355.
  180. ^ Kaufman, Stuart (1993). "Reviewed work: Black Earth, Red Star: A History of Soviet Security Policy, 1917-1991, R. Craig Nation". Russian History. 20 (1/4): 377–378. doi:10.1163/187633193X00847. JSTOR 24657366.
  181. ^ McKay, John P. (1970). "An Economic History of the U.S.S.R. By Alec Nove. Baltimore: Penguin Books, 1969". Slavic Review. 29 (4): 713–714. doi:10.2307/2493293. JSTOR 2493293.
  182. ^ Grossman, Gregory; Nove, Alec (1970). "An Economic History of the USSR". Russian Review. 29 (3): 338. doi:10.2307/127544. JSTOR 127544.
  183. ^ Chapman, Janet G. (1970). "Reviewed work: An Economic History of the USSR., Alec Nove". Journal of Economic Literature. 8 (3): 825–826. JSTOR 2720647.
  184. ^ Harrison, R. W. (2014). "Review: Stalin's Claws: From the Purges to the Winter War. Red Army Operations Before Barbarossa, 1937–1941". The Journal of Slavic Military Studies. 27 (4): 721–722. doi:10.1080/13518046.2014.963442.
  185. ^ Beaulieu, R. A. (1968). "Reviewed work: The Soviet Military and the Communist Party, Roman Kolkowicz". Naval War College Review. 20 (10): 97. JSTOR 44640659.
  186. ^ a b Mawdsley, Evan (2013). "Reviewed work: Fascination and Enmity: Russia and Germany as Entangled Histories, 1914-1945, Michael David-Fox, Peter Holquist, Alexander M. Martin". The Russian Review. 72 (3): 524–525. JSTOR 43661889.
  187. ^ a b Suny, Ronald Grigor (2013). "Reviewed work: Fascination and Enmity: Russia and Germany as Entangled Histories, 1914-1945, Michael David-Fox, Peter Holquist, Alexander M. Martin". German Studies Review. 36 (3): 709–711. doi:10.1353/gsr.2013.0110. JSTOR 43555167.
  188. ^ a b Nicole Eaton (2016). "Reviewed work: Fascination and Enmity: Russia and Germany as Entangled Histories, 1914-1945". The Slavonic and East European Review. 94 (4): 754. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.94.4.0754.
  189. ^ Crosby, David F.; Noggle, Anne; White, Christine A. (2002). "Reviewed work: A Dance with Death: Soviet Airwomen in World War II, NoggleAnne, WhiteChristine A". Air Power History. 49 (4): 58. JSTOR 26274372.
  190. ^ Bucher, Greta; Noggle, Anne (1995). "A Dance with Death: Soviet Airwomen in World War II". Russian Review. 54 (3): 477. doi:10.2307/131466. JSTOR 131466.
  191. ^ Haslam, Jonathan (2008). "Stalin's Wars: From World War to Cold War, 1939–1953. By Geoffrey Roberts. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2006. Pp. Xxii+467. $35.00". The Journal of Modern History. 80 (4): 968–970. doi:10.1086/596701.
  192. ^ Pauley, Bruce F. (2008). "Reviewed work: Stalin's Wars: From World War to Cold War, 1939–1953, Geoffrey Roberts". The Historian. 70 (2): 392–393. doi:10.1111/j.1540-6563.2008.00213_64.x. JSTOR 24454479.
  193. ^ Suny, Ronald Grigor (2002). "Making Sense of War: The Second World War and the Fate of the Bolshevik Revolution. By Amir  Weiner. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 2001. Pp. Xvi+416. $39.50". The Journal of Modern History. 74 (3): 693–695. doi:10.1086/345149.
  194. ^ Siegelbaum, Lewis H. (2001). "Making Sense of War: The Second World War and the Fate of the Bolshevik Revolution. By Amir Weiner Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2001. Xxiii, 416 pp. Notes. Bibliography. Index. Illustrations. Photographs. Figures. Tables. Maps. $39.50, hard bound". Slavic Review. 60 (4): 865–866. doi:10.2307/2697531. JSTOR 2697531.
  195. ^ Armstrong, John A. (2002). "Reviewed work: Making Sense of War: The Second World War and the Fate of the Bolshevik Revolution, Amir Weiner". The International History Review. 24 (1): 182–184. JSTOR 40110077.
  196. ^ Dziewanowski, M. K. (1993). "Reviewed work: The Soviet Home Front, 1941-1945: A Social and Economic History of the USSR in World War II, John Barber, Mark Harrison". Russian History. 20 (1/4): 392–394. doi:10.1163/187633193X00955. JSTOR 24657377.
  197. ^ Bidlack, Richard (1992). "The Soviet Home Front 1941-1945: A Social and Economic History of the USSR in World War II. By John Barber and Mark Harrison. New York: Longman, 1991. Xiii, 252 pp. Tables. Bibliography. Maps. Index. Paper". Slavic Review. 51 (3): 616–617. doi:10.2307/2500108. JSTOR 2500108.
  198. ^ Harrison, Mark (2008). "Reviewed work: Moscow 1941: A City and Its People at War, Rodric Braithwaite". Slavic Review. 67 (2): 511–512. doi:10.1017/S0037677900024207. JSTOR 27652910.
  199. ^ Liekis, Šarūnas (2010). "Reviewed work: The Holocaust in the Soviet Union, Yitzhak Arad". Journal of Baltic Studies. 41 (4): 560–562. doi:10.1080/01629778.2010.527145. JSTOR 43212992.
  200. ^ Rubenstein, Joshua (2010). "Reviewed work: The Holocaust in the Soviet Union, Yitzhak Arad". Slavic Review. 69 (3): 776–777. doi:10.1017/S0037677900012596. JSTOR 25746317.
  201. ^ Steinhart, Eric C. (2010). "Reviewed work: The Holocaust in the Soviet Union, Yitzhak Arad". The Journal of Interdisciplinary History. 41 (2): 297–298. doi:10.1162/JINH_r_00075. JSTOR 40785124.
  202. ^ Walke, Anika (2015). "Marching into Darkness: The Wehrmacht and the Holocaust in Belarus. By Waitman Wade Beorn. Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 2014". Slavic Review. 74: 194–195. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.74.1.194.
  203. ^ Johannes Due Enstad (2015). "Marching into Darkness: The Wehrmacht and the Holocaust in Belarus". The Slavonic and East European Review. 93 (3): 580. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.93.3.0580.
  204. ^ Marlow (2012). "We Are Here: Memories of the Lithuanian Holocaust". The Polish Review. 57 (3): 112. doi:10.5406/polishreview.57.3.0112.
  205. ^ Sandra Chaney (2016). "Reviewed work: Nazi Hunger Politics: A History of Food in the Third Reich, Gesine Gerhard". Agricultural History. 90 (4): 554. doi:10.3098/ah.2016.090.4.554.
  206. ^ Prodöhl, Ines (2016). "Reviewed work: Nazi Hunger Politics: A History of Food in the Third Reich, Gesine Gerhard". Central European History. 49 (2): 283–284. doi:10.1017/S0008938916000534. JSTOR 43965274.
  207. ^ Lumans, Valdis O. (2006). "Reviewed work: Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine, Wendy Lower". Central European History. 39 (3): 534–536. doi:10.1017/S000893890638017X. JSTOR 20457170.
  208. ^ Hagen, William W. (2007). "Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine. By Wendy Lower. Chapel Hill: University of Nordi Carolina Press, 2005. Xx, 307 pp". Slavic Review. 66 (2): 335–336. doi:10.2307/20060246. JSTOR 20060246.
  209. ^ Himka, John-Paul (2006). "Reviewed work: Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine, Wendy Lower". The International History Review. 28 (3): 634–636. JSTOR 40111263.
  210. ^ Share, Michael (2006). "Reviewed work: Nazi Empire-Building and the Holocaust in Ukraine, Wendy Lower". The Russian Review. 65 (3): 544–545. JSTOR 3877333.
  211. ^ Legvold, Robert (2014). "Reviewed work: The Devils' Alliance: Hitler's Pact with Stalin, 1939–1941, ROGER MOORHOUSE". Foreign Affairs. 93 (6): 197. JSTOR 24483963.
  212. ^ Harrison, Richard W. (2015). "The Devil's Alliance: Hitler's Pact with Stalin, 1939–1941, by Moorhouse, Roger". The Journal of Slavic Military Studies. 28 (3): 588–590. doi:10.1080/13518046.2015.1061829.
  213. ^ Edmonds, Robin (1990). "Reviewed work: The Unholy Alliance: Stalin's Pact with Hitler, Geoffrey Roberts". Soviet Studies. 42 (3): 594–595. JSTOR 152057.
  214. ^ Croan, Melvin (1991). "The Unholy Alliance: Stalin's Pact with Hitler. By Geoffrey Roberts. Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 1989". Slavic Review. 50 (3): 698–699. doi:10.2307/2499878. JSTOR 2499878.
  215. ^ Reese, R. R (2009). "Reviewed Work: Absolute War: Soviet Russia in the Second World War by Chris Bellamy". Slavic Review. 68 (3): 702–703. doi:10.1017/S0037677900020118. JSTOR 25621694.
  216. ^ Homze, Edward L. (1997). "Reviewed Work: When Titans Clashed: How the Red Army Stopped Hitler by David M. Glantz, Jonathan M. House, Darin Grauberger, George F. McCleary, Jr". The American Historical Review. 102 (3): 854–855. doi:10.2307/2171611. JSTOR 2171611.
  217. ^ Farrar, L. L. (1996). "When Titans Clashed: How the Red Army Stopped Hitler". History: Reviews of New Books. 24 (4): 184. doi:10.1080/03612759.1996.9952536.
  218. ^ Bobrow, J.; Grinberg, Ilya (2012). "Reviewed work: Red Phoenix Rising: The Soviet Air Force in World War II, von Hardesty, GrinbergIlya". Air Power History. 59 (3): 60. JSTOR 26276226.
  219. ^ Moorhouse, Roger (November 8, 2010). "Review: Bloodlands: Europe between Hitler and Stalin". History Extra. BBC. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  220. ^ Rubenstein, Joshua (November 26, 2010). "The Devils' Playground (review of Bloodlands by Timothy Snyder)". The New York Times. Retrieved 2 February 2020.
  221. ^ Legvold, Robert (2015). "Reviewed work: Roosevelt and Stalin: Portrait of a Partnership, SUSAN BUTLER". Foreign Affairs. 94 (2): 195. JSTOR 24483526.
  222. ^ Zimmer, Thomas; Neiberg, Michael (2016). "Reviewed work: Potsdam: The End of World War II and the Remaking of Europe, NeibergMichael". Journal of Contemporary History. 51 (4): 910–912. doi:10.1177/0022009416661476g. JSTOR 26416493.
  223. ^ Zubok, Vladislav (2011). "Yalta: The Price of Peace. By S. M Plokhy. New York: Viking, 2010". Slavic Review. 70: 203–204. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.70.1.0203.
  224. ^ Fedyashin, Anton (2011). "Reviewed work: Yalta: The Price of Peace, S. M. Plokhy". Russian Review. 70 (4): 712–713. JSTOR 41290068.
  225. ^ Folly, Martin (2019). "The Kremlin letters: Stalin's Wartime correspondence with Churchill and Roosevelt". Diplomacy & Statecraft. 30 (4): 837–838. doi:10.1080/09592296.2019.1666484.
  226. ^ Kuromiya, Hiroaki (2019). "The Kremlin Letters: Stalin's Wartime Correspondence with Churchill and Roosevelt. Edited by David Reynolds and Vladimir Pechatnov. (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 2018. )". Historian. 81 (4): 745–747. doi:10.1111/hisn.13297.
  227. ^ "The Oxford Handbook of the History of Communism". Oxford Handbooks Online. Oxford University Press. Retrieved 7 February 2020.
  228. ^ Kevin Morgan (2016). "The Oxford Handbook of the History of Communism". The Slavonic and East European Review. 94 (4): 756. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.94.4.0756.
  229. ^ Thurston, Robert W. (2000). "Reviewed work: Who Killed Kirov? The Kremlin's Greatest Mystery, Amy Knight". The Russian Review. 59 (2): 307–308. JSTOR 2679780.
  230. ^ James Harris (2012). The Slavonic and East European Review. 90: 174. doi:10.5699/slaveasteurorev2.90.1.0174. Missing or empty |title= (help)
  231. ^ Uldricks, Teddy J. (1976). "Reviewed work: The Social Prelude to Stalinism, Roger Pethybridge". The Journal of Modern History. 48 (4): 743–746. doi:10.1086/241515. JSTOR 1880223.
  232. ^ Perrie, Maureen (1976). "Reviewed work: The Social Prelude to Stalinism, Roger Pethybridge". Social History. 1 (1): 133–136. JSTOR 4284612.
  233. ^ Cohen, Stephen F. (1976). "The Social Prelude to Stalinism. By Roger Pethybridge. New York: St. Martin's Press, 1974". Slavic Review. 35: 134–135. doi:10.2307/2494839. JSTOR 2494839.
  234. ^ McNeal, Robert H.; Medvedev, Roy A.; Taylor, Colleen; Joravsky, David; Haupt, Georges (1972). "Let History Judge. The Origins and Consequences of Stalinism". Russian Review. 31 (2): 179. doi:10.2307/128210. JSTOR 128210.
  235. ^ Nove, Alec (1973). "Reviewed work: Let History Judge. The Origins and Consequences of Stalinism, Roy A. Medvedev". Soviet Studies. 24 (3): 431–434. JSTOR 150651.
  236. ^ Brovkin, Vladimir (1990). "Reviewed work: Let History Judge: The Origins and Consequences of Stalinism, Roy Medvedev". Russian History. 17 (2): 233–235. doi:10.1163/187633190X00499. JSTOR 24656443.
  237. ^ Zubok, Vladislav (2016). "Book Review: Stalin, Vol. I: Paradoxes of Power, 1878–1928". Cold War History. 16 (2): 231–233. doi:10.1080/14682745.2016.1153851.
  238. ^ Siegelbaum, L. (2015). "Stalin. Volume 1, Paradoxes of Power, 1878-1928". Slavic Review. 74 (3): 604–606. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.74.3.604.
  239. ^ Folly, Martin H. (2016). "Book Review: Stalin: Volume 1, Paradoxes of Power, 1878–1928". The Historian. 74 (4): 813–815. doi:10.1111/hisn.12396.
  240. ^ Tismaneanu, V. (2015). "Book Review: Stalin: Volume 1: The Paradoxes of Power, 1878–1928". Perspectives on Politics. 13 (2): 567–569. doi:10.1017/S1537592715000936.
  241. ^ Carley, Michael Jabara (2018). "Stalin. Vol. II: Waiting for Hitler 1928–1941". Europe-Asia Studies. 70 (3): 477–479. doi:10.1080/09668136.2018.1455444.
  242. ^ Brovkin, Vladimir (1993). "Reviewed work: Stalin: The Glasnost Revelations, Walter Laqueur". Russian History. 20 (1/4): 378–380. doi:10.1163/187633193X00856. JSTOR 24657367.
  243. ^ Graeme, Gill (2007). "Reviewed Works: Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar by Simon Sebag Montefiore". The Journal of Modern History. 79 (3): 723–725. doi:10.1086/523254. JSTOR 10.1086/523254.
  244. ^ Alexopoulos, Golfo (2008). "Book Review: Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar". Journal of Cold War Studies. 10 (1): 132–136. doi:10.1162/jcws.2008.10.1.132. Retrieved 3 February 2020.
  245. ^ Legvold, Robert (2004). "Reviewed Works: Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar by Simon Sebag Montefiore". Foreign Affairs. 83 (3): 151. doi:10.2307/20034014. JSTOR 20034014.
  246. ^ Mcdermott, K. (2008). "Young Stalin By Simon Sebag Montefiore". History. 93 (310): 300–301. doi:10.1111/j.1468-229X.2008.423_46.x.
  247. ^ Graeme, Gill (2007). "Reviewed Works: Stalin: A Biography by Robert Service". The Journal of Modern History. 79 (3): 723–725. doi:10.1086/523254. JSTOR 10.1086/523254.
  248. ^ Enteen, George (1974). "Reviewed work: Bukharin and the Bolshevik Revolution, a Political Biography, 1888-1938, Stephen F. Cohen". Russian History. 1 (2): 202–204. JSTOR 24649550.
  249. ^ Juviler, Peter; Cohen, Stephen F. (1974). "Bukharin and the Bolshevik Revolution: A Political Biography 1888-1938". Political Science Quarterly. 89 (4): 892. doi:10.2307/2148922. JSTOR 2148922.
  250. ^ Van Ree, Erik (2010). "Reviewed Work: Yezhov: The Rise of Stalin's "Iron Fist." by J. Arch Getty, Oleg V. Naumov, Nadezhda V. Muraveva". The Journal of Modern History. 82 (1): 249–251. doi:10.1086/649490. JSTOR 10.1086/649490.
  251. ^ Mawdsley, Evan (1994). "Reviewed work: Beria: Stalin's First Lieutenant, Amy Knight". Europe-Asia Studies. 46 (6): 1066–1067. JSTOR 152901.
  252. ^ Himmer, Robert; Knight, Amy (1995). "Beria: Stalin's First Lieutenant". Russian Review. 54: 142. doi:10.2307/130800. JSTOR 130800.
  253. ^ Duskin, Eric (2013). "Molotov: Stalin's Cold Warrior. By Geoffrey Roberts. Shapers on International History Series. Washington, D.C.: Potomac Books, 2012. Xxii, 231 pp". Slavic Review. 72 (2): 423–424. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.72.2.0423.
  254. ^ Hudson, George E. (2012). "Reviewed work: Molotov: Stalin's Cold Warrior. Shapers of International History, Geoffrey Roberts". Russian Review. 71 (4): 717–718. JSTOR 23263968.
  255. ^ Hill, Alexander (2013). "Stalin's General: The Life of Georgy Zhukov. By Geoffrey Roberts. New York: Random House, 2012. Xxii, 375 pp". Slavic Review. 72 (2): 422–423. doi:10.5612/slavicreview.72.2.0422.
  256. ^ Egan, Melinda A.; Egan, David R. "Joseph Stalin An Annotated Bibliography of English-Language Periodical Literature to 2005". Rowman & Littlefield. Retrieved 5 February 2020.
  257. ^ Sanchez, Jose Luis (1993). "Reviewed Work: The Rise and Fall of the Soviet Union; A Selected Bibliography of Sources in English (Bibliographies and Indexes in World History, no.27) by Abraham J. Edelheit, Hershel Edelheit". RQ (Russia Quarterly). 32 (3): 430–431.

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