Biddulph Recordings

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Biddulph Records
Founded1989 (1989)
FounderPeter Biddulph
Eric Wen
Country of originUnited Kingdom
LocationDevon, England
Official websitewww.biddulphrecordings.co.uk

Biddulph Recordings is a record label based in Devon, England[1] specialising in the restoration of historical performances, particularly by string musicians.[2] It was founded in 1989 by violin dealer Peter Biddulph and Eric Wen, a musicologist and historian of string performances.[3][2] In 2003, Sarah Woodward joined and has since overseen the historical vocal label Romophone.[4] Biddulph Recordings’ honours include the Gramophone 1999 ICRC award for “Historical Recording of the Year."[citation needed]

Historic reissues[edit]

The early Biddulph titles included the first digital reissues of recordings by Fritz Kreisler, Joseph Szigeti, Jacques Thibaud, and Yehudi Menuhin.[2][5][6] By the mid-1990s, Biddulph Recordings had also released complete editions of Bronisław Huberman, Mischa Elman, Jan Kubelík, Henri Temianka, Toscha Seidel, Ossy Renardy, Lionel Tertis, William Primrose, Pablo Casals, and Ruggiero Ricci.[7][8][5][9][10][11][12] The Biddulph label soon include historical piano recordings, with the first digital reissues of recordings by Alfred Cortot, Harold Bauer, and Percy Grainger,[6][13][14][15] followed by Myra Hess, Moriz Rosenthal, Raoul Koczalski, Wilhelm Backhaus, and Shura Cherkassky.[16][17][18][6][19] Biddulph later branched into historical orchestral and chamber music, reissuing the work of Willem Mengelberg, Serge Koussevitzky, Leopold Stokowski, Thomas Beecham, Max Fiedler, and Hermann Abendroth,[20][21][4][6][22][23][24] as well as the Budapest String Quartet, the Busch Quartet, the Capet Quartet, and the Primrose Quartet.[25][26][27][28]

Original recordings[edit]

Biddulph Recordings has also produced a number of important original recordings.[12] The first of these was the recital recording debut of violinist Maxim Vengerov, then an unknown 14-year-old prodigy.[12][6] This was followed by Ruggiero Ricci’s accounts of the Beethoven and Brahms Concertos featuring 16 and 14 different cadenzas respectively (both concerto albums were tracked to enable the listener to choose which cadenza to program into each performance). [29] Other new recordings on the Biddulph label include the Bach interpretations of pianist Edward Aldwell,[30] and the violin performances of Oscar Shumsky, Aaron Rosand, and Arnold Steinhardt.[3][31][32]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Contacts". Tokyo String Quartet. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  2. ^ a b c "OUT NOW - Arnold Steinhardt and Seymour Lipkin's "Weber: Six Violin Sonatas"". The Violin Channel. 7 March 2022. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  3. ^ a b Robbins, Terry (2 November 2020). "EARLY, CLASSICAL AND BEYOND". The Whole Note. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  4. ^ a b "CD Restorations of Recordings of Leopold Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra". Stokowski.org. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  5. ^ a b Munstedt, Peter (1991). "Recordings Received" (PDF). Association for Recorded Sound Collections. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  6. ^ a b c d e "Welcome". Peter Biddulph. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  7. ^ "Ossy Renardy". AllMusic. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  8. ^ "Bronislaw Huberman". AllMusic. 1993. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  9. ^ "Jan Kubelík - Historical Recordings". Jan Kubelik Society. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  10. ^ McLellan, Joseph (16 August 1992). "Classical Recordings". The Washington Post. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  11. ^ Munstedt, Peter (1992). "Recordings Received" (PDF). Association for Recorded Sound Collections. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  12. ^ a b c "Peter Biddulph". Maestronet. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  13. ^ "Alfred Cortot". AllMusic. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  14. ^ "Harold Bauer/Biddulph/". Pianist Discography. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  15. ^ Simon, Robert. Peter Grainger: The Pictorial Biography. p. 129.
  16. ^ "Shura Cherkassky: The Young Shura Cherkassky". AllMusic. 1999. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  17. ^ "Myra Hess : the complete solo American Columbia recordings". WorldCat. 1994. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  18. ^ "Moriz Rosenthal". AllMusic. 1999. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  19. ^ "Wilhelm Backhaus: Beethoven: Piano Concertos Nos. 4 & 5 "Emperor"". AllMusic. 1997. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  20. ^ "The complete solo double-bass recordings ; Early recordings with the Boston Symphony". University of Nebraska Kearney. 1994. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  21. ^ "Willem Mengelberg : the complete 1922-25 New York Philharmonic recordings". University of Chicago. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  22. ^ "CD Masters". BBC. 16 January 2006. Retrieved 13 February 2022.
  23. ^ "Max Fiedler conducts Brahms". WorldCat. 1994. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  24. ^ "Brahms: Symphonies Nos. 1 & 3". AllMusic. 1999. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  25. ^ "Budapesti Voanosneagyes : (The original Budapest Quartet)". WorldCat. 1998. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  26. ^ "String quartet in F, op. 59, no. 1 ; String quartet no. 8 in E minor, op. 59, no. 2". WorldCat. 2004. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  27. ^ "Capet String Quartet : string quartets". WorldCat. 2020. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  28. ^ "Primrose Quartet: The Primrose Quartet". AllMusic. 1992. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  29. ^ "Beethoven Violin Concerto: Concerto for Violin and Orchestra". Gramophone. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  30. ^ "Aldwell's Bach". Bach Cantatas. 1996. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  31. ^ "BRAHMS Violin Concerto (Oscar Shumsky)". Gramophone. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.
  32. ^ "Fuchs Works for Violin and Piano". Gramophone. n.d. Retrieved 13 March 2022.