Bidyadanga Community, Western Australia

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Bidyadanga
Western Australia
Bidyadanga is located in Western Australia
Bidyadanga
Bidyadanga
Coordinates18°41′04″S 121°46′39″E / 18.68442°S 121.77748°E / -18.68442; 121.77748Coordinates: 18°41′04″S 121°46′39″E / 18.68442°S 121.77748°E / -18.68442; 121.77748
Population555 (2016 census)[1]
Postcode(s)6725
Location190 km (118 mi) S of Broome, Western Australia
LGA(s)Shire of Broome
State electorate(s)Kimberley
Federal Division(s)Durack

Bidyadanga, also known as La Grange, is the largest Aboriginal community in Western Australia, with a population of approximately 750 residents . It is located 180 kilometres (110 mi) south of Broome and 1,590 kilometres (990 mi) from the state capital Perth, in the Kimberley Region. The traditional owners of the land are the Karajarri people, but is also home to the several other language groups.

Started as a government rations distribution point by the government in 1903, La Grange became a mission station run by German Pallotine missionaries in 1955, before the formation of Bidyadanga Aboriginal Community La Grange (BACLG) in 1975, and subsequent independence from the mission in 1982.

Community[edit]

It is the largest Aboriginal community in the state and supports a population of approximately 750 people.[2] The community has been involved in publications of local stories.[3]

Governance[edit]

The Bidyadanga Aboriginal Community La Grange (BACLG) was incorporated in 1975 as a not-for-profit organisation to administer government-funded programs.[4] It was incorporated under the Aboriginal Communities Act 1979 (WA).

Town planning[edit]

Bidyadanga Layout Plan No.3 was prepared in accordance with WA State Planning Policy 3.2 (Aboriginal Settlements). It was endorsed by the community on 15 November 2012 and the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) on 28 May 2013.[5]

History[edit]

Early years[edit]

Located on Thangoo Station south of Broome, La Grange had been a government rations distribution post for Karajarri and Ngungamada people. Being in the pearling region, there was much contact between Asian pearling crews and local Aboriginal women. In 1903 and a constable and tracker were stationed there. The WA administration prevented the local Salesians from establishing a mission there. During World War II, German Pallottines made enquiries, but Germans were not allowed on the coast by the Australian Army. In late 1948, desert people from Udialla were moved there by the government, and plans for a children's institution were mooted.[6]

In the 1950s, after two lay missionaries had started a school, Frankfurt anthropologists Helmut Petri and his wife Dr Gisela Odermann began to conduct fieldwork at La Grange. In January 1956 the Pallottines, presided over by Fr. Hügel, took charge of the mission, and dormitories, a dining hall, hospital and other buildings were built. Other missionaries joined them, and prayers, a collection of Bible stories, and an outline of kinship terms were published in the local languages. It was considered an "enlightened" mission.[6]

In 1964 the mission was devastated by Cyclone Bessie, which destroyed the school, the hospital and all of the huts. The mission was financed and rebuilt by a combination of various Catholic funds and the Department of Native Affairs.[6]

By 1981 there were about 400 persons living at La Grange. In 1982 the community asked for independence from the mission, and after the 1983 Seaman Aboriginal Land inquiry, the Bidyadanga Aboriginal Community asked for the mission land to be transferred to them.[6]

Native title[edit]

In 2002 and 2004 the Karajarri had their native title rights and interests recognised, over 31,000 square kilometres (12,000 sq mi) – about half the size of Tasmania – in the West Kimberley.[7] On 12 December 2002 the case known as "John Dudu Nangkiriny & Others on behalf of the Karajarri People v The State of Western Australia & Others", or "Karajarri People (Area A)" (ref. WCD2002/001) determined that native title exists in the entire area.[8]

The claim to Area B was finalised on 8 September 2004, with "Nangkiriny v State of Western Australia [2004], FCA 1156", when it was determined that native title existed in parts of Area B only, giving the Karajarri non-exclusive native title rights over the land and waters in this area.[9]

Climate[edit]

The locality received Australia's highest May temperature of 40.6 °C (105.1 °F) on 6 May 1990 (as of May 2018).[10]

Climate data for Bidyadanga, Western Australia
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Record high °C (°F) 45.7
(114.3)
45.0
(113.0)
44.0
(111.2)
42.8
(109.0)
40.6
(105.1)
36.2
(97.2)
36.6
(97.9)
38.2
(100.8)
42.4
(108.3)
45.2
(113.4)
46.5
(115.7)
47.0
(116.6)
47.0
(116.6)
Average high °C (°F) 34.4
(93.9)
34.1
(93.4)
35.4
(95.7)
35.7
(96.3)
32.5
(90.5)
29.8
(85.6)
29.6
(85.3)
31.1
(88.0)
32.9
(91.2)
34.4
(93.9)
35.0
(95.0)
35.0
(95.0)
33.3
(91.9)
Average low °C (°F) 26.0
(78.8)
25.6
(78.1)
24.9
(76.8)
22.1
(71.8)
18.4
(65.1)
15.5
(59.9)
14.1
(57.4)
14.9
(58.8)
17.6
(63.7)
21.2
(70.2)
24.1
(75.4)
25.8
(78.4)
20.8
(69.4)
Record low °C (°F) 18.0
(64.4)
16.7
(62.1)
17.8
(64.0)
11.7
(53.1)
8.6
(47.5)
3.9
(39.0)
3.9
(39.0)
5.0
(41.0)
7.1
(44.8)
8.9
(48.0)
16.3
(61.3)
17.0
(62.6)
3.9
(39.0)
Average precipitation mm (inches) 129.1
(5.08)
139.5
(5.49)
94.9
(3.74)
25.0
(0.98)
25.0
(0.98)
19.6
(0.77)
8.2
(0.32)
2.3
(0.09)
1.3
(0.05)
1.2
(0.05)
7.6
(0.30)
59.1
(2.33)
516.4
(20.33)
Average rainy days 6.3 6.2 4.5 1.3 1.4 1.1 0.5 0.3 0.1 0.2 0.6 2.6 25.1
Source: [11]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Australian Bureau of Statistics (27 June 2017). "Bidyadanga (ILOC)". 2016 Census QuickStats. Retrieved 18 March 2018. Edit this at Wikidata
  2. ^ Government of Western Australia (October 2008). Bidyadanga Community Layout Plan Number 2
  3. ^ Bidyadanga Community; Thompson, Liz; Bidyadanga Community (2011), The danger seed : lirrinngkirn dreaming, Pearson Australia, ISBN 978-1-4425-4694-3
  4. ^ Bidyadanga Aboriginal Community, La Grange (2012), Bidyaganga Aboriginal Community La Grange Inc, Bidyadanga Aboriginal Community, La Grange Inc., retrieved 6 February 2013
  5. ^ "Bidyadanga Layout Plan 3: Background Report". Western Australian Planning Commission. May 2013. Retrieved 8 December 2019. Cite journal requires |journal= (help)
  6. ^ a b c d "La Grange Mission (Bidyadanga) (1924-1985)". German missionaries in Australia. Griffith University. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  7. ^ Weir, Jessica K. (2011), Karajarri: A West Kimberley experience in managing native title (PDF), AIATSIS Research Discussion Paper (No. 30), Australian Institute of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Studies. Native Title Research Unit, ISBN 9780987135315, retrieved 8 December 2019, This paper considers this ‘next level’. What happens after the native title rights are recognised?
  8. ^ "WCD2002/001 - Karajarri People (Area A)". National Native Title Tribunal. Australian Government. Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  9. ^ Bourova, Evgenia; Dias, Nuwan (12 August 2011). "Bidyadanga Initial Works Indigenous Land Use Agreement (ILUA)". ATNS (28 October 2011 ed.). Retrieved 8 December 2019.
  10. ^ "Extremes for May 2018". Bureau of Meteorology. Retrieved 7 June 2018.
  11. ^ "Climate Statistics for Bidyadanga". Australian Bureau of Meteorology. Retrieved 7 June 2018.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]