Bielawa

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Bielawa
Corpus Christi church in Bielawa
Corpus Christi church in Bielawa
Flag of Bielawa
Flag
Coat of arms of Bielawa
Coat of arms
Bielawa is located in Poland
Bielawa
Bielawa
Coordinates: 50°42′N 16°37′E / 50.700°N 16.617°E / 50.700; 16.617
Country Poland
VoivodeshipLower Silesian
CountyDzierżoniów
GminaBielawa (urban gmina)
First mentioned1288
Town rights1924
Government
 • MayorMichał Glob Mika
Area
 • Total36.21 km2 (13.98 sq mi)
Highest elevation
964 m (3,163 ft)
Lowest elevation
280 m (920 ft)
Population
 (2019-06-30[1])
 • Total29,971
 • Density830/km2 (2,100/sq mi)
Time zoneUTC+1 (CET)
 • Summer (DST)UTC+2 (CEST)
Postal code
58-260 to 58-263
Area code(s)+48 74
Car platesDDZ
Websitehttp://www.bielawa.pl

Bielawa [bʲɛˈlava] (About this soundlisten) (German: Langenbielau; Silesian: Bielawa), population 30,055 (2018),[2] is a town in southwestern Poland. Since 1999, it has been situated in Dzierżoniów County, Lower Silesian Voivodeship. From 1975–1998, it was part of the Wałbrzych Voivodeship.

Bielawa lies in the central part of Lower Silesia, along the Bielawica stream in the Owl Mountains region. The town covers an area in excess of 36 square kilometres (14 sq mi).

Bielawa lies at an altitude range of 280 and 964 m above sea level, in the Owl Mountains. It is considered one of the most naturally beautiful regions of the Lower Silesian Voivodeship, and is a year-round tourist destination. Its outdoor attractions include four major hiking trails of varying difficulty in an 80 square kilometer scenic park, as well as cycling trails and ski lifts.

History[edit]

Parkowa Hill and Bielawa Lake in Bielawa

The oldest known mention of Bielawa dates back to 1288, when it was part of fragmented Piast-ruled Poland.[3] Its name is of Polish origin and is derived from the word biela, bila, current Polish biała ("white").[3]

In 1720 the first brick house was built in the village and in 1741 it was captured and afterwards annexed by Prussia. In 1805 Christian Dierig founded a weaving company (Christian Dierig AG). During the Napoleonic Wars, the village was occupied by France. In 1844 it was the site of the Weavers' Uprising, brutally crushed by the Prussians.[3] From 1871 to 1945 it was part of Germany. In 1891 the Dzierżoniów–Bielawa railway line opened. In 1924 Bielawa obtained town rights.[3] During World War II the Germans established the FAL Langenbielau II subcamp of the Gross-Rosen concentration camp in the town.[4] In 1945 it was captured by the Soviets and eventually reintegrated with Poland. Greeks, refugees of the Greek Civil War, settled in Bielawa in the 1950s.[5] Sometime around this time, the railway closed. Around 2000-2009 the Bielbaw factory closed, the company went bankrupt and was bought by Greno. In 2006 the bypass was opened . In 2018 the railway opened again. In 2019, hotel pod welcom sovom was bought and closed down for renovations.

Main sights[edit]

Bielawa has a rich choice of old architecture. At its center is the 19th-century Neo-Gothic Church of the Assumption with a 101 m tall tower, the third tallest in Poland. Other interesting buildings include a late-Renaissance palace originally built as a fortified manor house; the Church of the Corpus Christi, erected in 1743; and numerous 18th-century Baroque houses that were restored in the 19th and early 20th centuries. It is also a home to a number of medieval penitential crosses.

Population[edit]

Notable people[edit]

Eleni, singer

Twin towns – sister cities[edit]

Bielawa is twinned with:[6]

Surroundings[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Population. Size and structure and vital statistics in Poland by territorial divison in 2019. As of 30th June". stat.gov.pl. Statistics Poland. 2019-10-15. Retrieved 2020-02-14. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ "Statistics Population GUS" (PDF).
  3. ^ a b c d "Historia miasta". um.bielawa.pl (in Polish). Retrieved 14 March 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Subcamps of KL Gross- Rosen". Gross-Rosen Museum in Rogoźnica. Retrieved 14 March 2020. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ Izabela Kubasiewicz, Emigranci z Grecji w Polsce Ludowej. Wybrane aspekty z życia mniejszości, p. 117 (in Polish)
  6. ^ "Main Page – Miasta Partnerskie". um.bielawa.pl (in Polish). Bielawa. Retrieved 2020-02-27. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 50°42′N 16°37′E / 50.700°N 16.617°E / 50.700; 16.617