Big Shots (album)

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Big Shots
Big Shots (album).jpg
Studio album by Charizma & Peanut Butter Wolf
Released November 18, 2003 (2003-11-18)
Recorded 1991–1993
Studio Studio Apogee, San Jose, California
Genre West Coast hip hop
Length 46:24
Label Stones Throw Records
Producer Peanut Butter Wolf
Charizma & Peanut Butter Wolf chronology
Big Shots
(2003)
Big Shots Bonus EP
(2004)
Singles from Big Shots
  1. "My World Premiere"
    Released: 1996
  2. "Devotion"
    Released: 2000
  3. "Here's a Smirk"
    Released: 2003
  4. "Jack the Mack"
    Released: 2003
Professional ratings
Review scores
Source Rating
AllMusic 3/5 stars[1]
The A.V. Club favorable[2]
CMJ New Music Monthly favorable[3]
Dusted Magazine favorable[4]
East Bay Express favorable[5]
HipHopDX 4.0/5[6]
Metro Silicon Valley favorable[7]
RapReviews.com 6/10[8]
Spin favorable[9]
XLR8R favorable[10]

Big Shots is a studio album by American hip hop duo Charizma & Peanut Butter Wolf.[11] Recorded between 1991 and 1993 for Hollywood BASIC, it was released on Stones Throw Records in 2003, 10 years after Charizma's death.[6] It peaked at number 2 on CMJ's Hip-Hop chart[12] and at number 27 on the CMJ Radio 200 chart.[13] The first single, entitled "My World Premiere", was originally released in 1996.[4]

Critical reception[edit]

Sam Samuelson of AllMusic gave the album 3 stars out of 5, calling it "a treasure that should be cherished by hip-hop fans the world over."[1] Todd Inoue of Metro Silicon Valley said, "Charizma sounds like MC Shan blessed with youthful lung capacity while PB Wolf makes like Marley Marl programming beats in DJ Premier's lab."[7] Ross Hogg of XLR8R said, "Charizma's voice brims with eagerness, enthusiasm and earnestness; Wolf's textured, jazzy beats epitomize boom bap and are a sign of great things to come."[10]

Nathan Rabin of The A.V. Club said, "while Big Shots is one of those charmed debuts where nearly every song sounds like a terrific single, it wouldn't be without Wolf, whose gorgeously constructed tracks, flawless ear for melody, and extensive sonic quotations anticipate Madlib."[2] Rachel Swan of East Bay Express said, "had Charizma not been shot and killed in '93, he might've turned into another Pharoahe Monch or J-Live."[5]

East Bay Express named it one of the best local albums of 2003.[14] In 2007, The A.V. Club listed it on the "10 Unjustly Overlooked Hip-Hop Classics" list.[15]

Track listing[edit]

No. Title Length
1. "Here's a Smirk" 3:31
2. "Methods" 4:07
3. "Jack the Mack" 3:10
4. "Talk About a Girl" 1:24
5. "Red Light Green Light" 2:40
6. "Tell You Something" 3:38
7. "Gatha Round" 3:00
8. "Devotion" 3:59
9. "Apple Juice Break" 0:38
10. "My World Premiere" 2:07
11. "Ice Cream Truck" 3:37
12. "Charizma What" 3:47
13. "Fair Weathered Friend" 4:04
14. "Soon to Be Large" 3:15
15. "Pacin' the Floor" 3:27

Personnel[edit]

Credits adapted from the CD liner notes.

  • Charizma – vocals
  • Peanut Butter Wolf – production, executive production
  • Peter Stanley – recording
  • Dave Cooley – mastering
  • Jeff Jank – design, photography
  • Theresa Castro – photography
  • Egon – label management

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Samuelson, Sam. "Big Shots - Charizma". AllMusic. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  2. ^ a b Rabin, Nathan (January 12, 2004). "Charizma & Peanut Butter Wolf: Big Shots". The A.V. Club. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  3. ^ Gladstone, Neil (January 2004). "Best New Music". CMJ New Music Monthly (120): 45. 
  4. ^ a b Huffman, Emily (March 7, 2004). "Dusted Reviews: Charizma and Peanut Butter Wolf - Big Shots". Dusted Magazine. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  5. ^ a b Swan, Rachel (December 31, 2003). "Charizma and Peanut Butter Wolf - Big Shots". East Bay Express. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  6. ^ a b J-23 (November 30, 2003). "Charizma & Peanut Butter Wolf - Big Shots". HipHopDX. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b Inoue, Todd (February 12, 2004). "Charizma Comes Alive". Metro Silicon Valley. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  8. ^ Juon, Steve (October 28, 2003). "Charizma & Peanut Butter Wolf :: Big Shots :: Stones Throw Records". RapReviews.com. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  9. ^ Hermes, Will (February 2004). "Reissues". Spin. p. 100. 
  10. ^ a b Hogg, Ross (February 24, 2004). "Charizma & Peanut Butter Wolf - Big Shots". XLR8R. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  11. ^ Li, Christina (May 19, 2011). "Peanut Butter Wolf on His History with 45s and Why the Vinyl Comeback Is Overhyped". SF Weekly. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  12. ^ "Hip-Hop (Period Ending 2/3/2004)". CMJ New Music Report (852): 15. February 16, 2004. 
  13. ^ "CMJ Radio 200 (Period Ending 2/3/2004)". CMJ New Music Report (852): 8. February 16, 2004. 
  14. ^ Swan, Rachel (November 26, 2003). "Best Music of the East Bay". East Bay Express. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 
  15. ^ Rabin, Nathan (January 5, 2007). "Inventory: 10 Unjustly Overlooked Hip-Hop Classics". The A.V. Club. Retrieved May 30, 2017. 

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]