Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament

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Big Ten Conference Men's Basketball Tournament
Sport College basketball
Conference Big Ten Conference
Number of teams 14
Format Single-elimination tournament
Current stadium Verizon Center
Current location Washington, D.C.
Played 1998–present
Last contest 2017
Current champion Michigan Wolverines
Most championships Michigan State Spartans (5)
TV partner(s) CBS (semifinals and championship game)
ESPN, ESPN2, Big Ten Network (other rounds)
Official website [1]
Host stadiums
United Center (1998–2001, 2003, 2005, 2007, 2013, 2015)
Bankers Life Fieldhouse (2002, 2004, 2006, 2008–12, 2014, 2016)
Verizon Center (2017)
Madison Square Garden (2018)

The Big Ten Conference men's basketball tournament is held annually at the end of the men's college basketball regular season. The tournament has been played each year since 1998. The winner of the tournament is designated the Big Ten Tournament Champion, and receives the conference's automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament. The Big Ten was one of the last NCAA Division I college basketball conferences to start a tournament. The finals of the tournament are typically held immediately before the field for the NCAA Tournament is announced.

On five occasions, the champion of the tournament has gone on to reach the Final Four of the NCAA Tournament (Michigan State in 1999 and 2000, Illinois in 2005, Ohio State in 2007, Wisconsin in 2015). In 2000, champion Michigan State won the NCAA Tournament.

The No. 1 seed has won the tournament eight times, the most of any seed. The lowest seed to win the tournament was Michigan as a No. 8 seed in 2017.

Host[edit]

The Big Ten Men's Basketball tournaments have been held at neutral sites every year. The first four tournaments were held at United Center in Chicago, Illinois. Beginning in 2002, the tournament alternated between United Center and Conseco Fieldhouse (later known as Bankers Life Fieldhouse) in Indianapolis, Indiana. In 2008, the tournament began a five-year residence in Indianapolis.[1]

On June 5, 2011, the Big Ten announced that the tournament would revert to alternating between Indianapolis and Chicago. The 2013 and 2015 tournaments were played at United Center in Chicago and the 2014 and 2016 tournaments were played at Bankers Life Fieldhouse in Indianapolis.[2]

The 2017 Tournament was held at Verizon Center in Washington, D.C.[3][4] The 2018 Tournament will be held at Madison Square Garden in New York and will be held a week earlier than usual due to the Big East Tournament, ending on March 4, 2018, one week before Selection Sunday.[5][6][7]

Vacated results[edit]

Due to various rulings against participating programs, some of the results of the Big Ten Tournament have been vacated or voided. Here is a compiled list of sanctions imposed that have affected the results and records of the tournament since its inception. The information in this article does not include results of the teams in which records were vacated.

  • Because of the Minnesota academic scandal, the NCAA has vacated the postseason tournament records for the Minnesota basketball team from the 1993–94 season through the 1998–99 season.[8] Minnesota had a record of 2–1 in the 1998 Tournament and went 0–1 in 1999.
  • Because of the University of Michigan basketball scandal, the NCAA vacated the records for the Michigan basketball team from the 1995–96 season through the 1998–99 season, including the 1998 and 1999 Big Ten Tournaments.[9] Michigan had won the Tournament championship in 1998 with a 3–0 record, and had a record of 1–1 in 1999.
  • The NCAA has vacated the NCAA records for the Ohio State basketball team from the 1998–99 season through the 2001–02 season.[10] Ohio State had a record of 1–1 in the 1999 Tournament, went 0–1 in 2000 and 2001, and had won the championship in 2002.

Results and records[edit]

Results by year[edit]

Year Champion Seed Score Runner-up Seed Most Valuable Player Site
1998 Michigan (vacated) [note 1] 4 76–67 Purdue 3 Robert Traylor, Michigan [note 1] United Center, Chicago
1999 Michigan State 1 67–50 Illinois 11 Mateen Cleaves, Michigan State United Center, Chicago
2000 Michigan State 2 76–61 Illinois 4 Morris Peterson, Michigan State United Center, Chicago
2001 Iowa 6 63–61 Indiana 4 Reggie Evans, Iowa United Center, Chicago
2002 Ohio State (vacated) [note 2] 2 81–64 Iowa 9 Boban Savovic, Ohio State [note 2] Conseco Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2003 Illinois 2 72–59 Ohio State 8 Brian Cook, Illinois United Center, Chicago
2004 Wisconsin 2 70–53 Illinois 1 Devin Harris, Wisconsin Conseco Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2005 Illinois 1 54–43 Wisconsin 2 James Augustine, Illinois United Center, Chicago
2006 Iowa 2 67–60 Ohio State 1 Jeff Horner, Iowa Conseco Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2007 Ohio State 1 66–49 Wisconsin 2 Mike Conley Jr., Ohio State United Center, Chicago
2008 Wisconsin 1 61–48 Illinois 10 Marcus Landry, Wisconsin Conseco Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2009 Purdue 3 65–61 Ohio State 5 Robbie Hummel, Purdue Conseco Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2010 Ohio State 1 90–61 Minnesota 6 Evan Turner, Ohio State Conseco Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2011 Ohio State 1 71–60 Penn State 6 Jared Sullinger, Ohio State Conseco Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2012 Michigan State 1 68–64 Ohio State 3 Draymond Green, Michigan State Conseco Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2013 Ohio State 2 50–43 Wisconsin 4 Aaron Craft, Ohio State United Center, Chicago
2014 Michigan State 3 69–55 Michigan 1 Branden Dawson, Michigan State Bankers Life Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2015 Wisconsin 1 80–69OT Michigan State 3 Frank Kaminsky, Wisconsin United Center, Chicago
2016 Michigan State 2 66–62 Purdue 4 Denzel Valentine, Michigan State Bankers Life Fieldhouse, Indianapolis
2017 Michigan 8 71–56 Wisconsin 2 Derrick Walton, Michigan Verizon Center, Washington, D.C.
2018 Madison Square Garden, New York City

Most championships[edit]

School Titles Years
Michigan State 5 1999, 2000, 2012, 2014, 2016
Ohio State^ 4 2007, 2010, 2011, 2013
Wisconsin 3 2004, 2008, 2015
Illinois 2 2003, 2005
Iowa 2 2001, 2006
Purdue 1 2009
Michigan* 1 2017
Minnesota 0
Indiana 0
Penn State 0
Northwestern 0
Nebraska 0
Maryland 0
Rutgers 0

* 1998 championship vacated by Michigan.
^ 2002 championship vacated by Ohio State.

Most consecutive championships[edit]

2 – Michigan St. (1999, 2000), Ohio St. (2010, 2011)

Records all-time by team[edit]

through 2017 Tournament[9]
School Record Winning pct Championships Runners-up
Ohio State 26–14[note 2] .650 4 4
Michigan State 29–16 .644 5 1
Illinois 27–19 .587 2 4
Wisconsin 23–17 .575 3 3
Michigan 18–17[note 1] .514 1 1
Iowa 15–19 .441 2 1
Minnesota 15–19[note 3] .441 0 1
Maryland 2–3 .400 0 0
Purdue 12–20 .375 1 2
Indiana 12–20 .375 0 1
Penn State 12–20 .375 0 1
Northwestern 11–20 .355 0 0
Nebraska 3–6 .333 0 0
Rutgers 1–3 .250 0 0

Records all-time by seed[edit]

through 2017 Tournament[11]
Seed Record Winning pct Championships Runners-up
1 33–11 .750 8 3
2 26–11[note 2] .703 5* 2
3 18–16[note 2] .529 2 3
4 14–18[note 1] .438 0* 3
5 11–19 .367 0 1
6 28–17[note 3] .622 1 2
7 13–19 .406 0 0
8 15–18[note 3] .455 1 1
9 8–19 .296 0 1
10 10–18[note 1] .357 0 1
11 7–19 .269 0 1
12 2–5 .286 0 0
13 2–2 .500 0 0
14 0–2 .000 0 0

* Does not include vacated wins by Michigan (1998) and Ohio State (2002)

Coaches by total Big Ten Tournament wins and championships[edit]

  • Tom Izzo – Michigan State: 29–16; 5 championships
  • Thad Matta – Ohio State: 23–9; 4 championships
  • Bo Ryan – Wisconsin: 19–11; 3 championships
  • Steve Alford – Iowa: 13–6; 2 championships
  • John Beilein – Michigan: 15–9; 1 championship
  • Bruce Weber – Illinois: 12–8; 1 championship
  • Matt Painter – Purdue: 9–11; 1 championship
  • Bill Self – Illinois: 5–2; 1 championship
  • Mike Davis – Indiana: 7–6; 0 championships
  • Tubby Smith – Minnesota: 7–6; 0 championships
  • Lon Kruger – Illinois: 6–3; 0 championships
  • Ed DeChellis – Penn State: 5–8; 0 championships
  • Bill Carmody – Northwestern: 5–13; 0 championships

Note: Current coaches at school in bold. Minimum of 5 wins.[12]

Coaches by highest all-time winning %[edit]

.719 – Thad Matta (Ohio St.) (23–9)
.714 – Bill Self (Illinois) (5–2)
.684 – Steve Alford (Iowa) (13–6)
.667 – Lon Kruger (Illinois) (6–3)
.644 – Tom Izzo (Michigan St.) (29–16)
.633 – Bo Ryan (Wisconsin) (19–11)
.625 – John Beilein (Michigan) (15–9)
.600 – Bruce Weber (Illinois) (12–8)
.571 – Dick Bennett (Wisconsin) (4–3)
.538 – Mike Davis (Indiana) (7–6)
.538 – Tubby Smith (Minnesota) (7–6)
.450 – Matt Painter (Purdue) (9–11)
.444 – John Groce (Illinois) (4–5)
.400 – Mark Turgeon (Maryland) (2–3)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e Due to NCAA sanctions, Michigan has vacated the records from the 1992 Final Four, the 1992-93, 1995-96, 1996-97, 1997-98, and 1998-99 seasons. See above section Vacated results
  2. ^ a b c d e Due to NCAA sanctions, Ohio State has vacated the records of 34 games in 1998-99, 16 games in 1999–00 and the entire 2000-01 and 2001-02 seasons. See above section Vacated results
  3. ^ a b c Due to NCAA sanctions, Minnesota has vacated the records from the 1993-94, 1994-95, 1995-96, 1996-97, 1997-98, and 1998-99 seasons. See above section Vacated results

Television coverage[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]