Bill Dickie (politician)

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William "Bill" Daniel Dickie
City of Calgary Alderman
In office
October 23, 1961 – October 19, 1964
Member of the Legislative Assembly of Alberta
In office
June 17, 1963 – March 25, 1975
Preceded by Ernest Watkins
Succeeded by Hugh Planche
Constituency Calgary Glenmore
Minister of Mines and Minerals
In office
September 10, 1971 – March 1975
Premier Peter Lougheed
Preceded by Allen Patrick
Succeeded by Portfolio abolished
Personal details
Born (1925-08-13) August 13, 1925 (age 92)
Calgary, Alberta
Political party Liberal
Progressive Conservative
Occupation lawyer and politician

William Daniel "Bill" Dickie (born August 13, 1925) is a former politician from Alberta, Canada.[1] He served on Calgary city council from 1961 to 1964 and in the Legislative Assembly of Alberta from 1963 to 1975. He served as a cabinet minister in the government of Peter Lougheed from 1971 to 1975.

Early life[edit]

Dickie began practicing corporate law in 1951. He laid the legal framework for the first Canadian company to be listed on the American Stock Exchange.[2]

Political career[edit]

Dickie served on Calgary city council from 1961 to 1964.[2] While still serving on council he ran for a seat in the Alberta Legislature in the 1963 general election, as a candidate for the Alberta Liberal party in the electoral district of Calgary Glenmore. He won the seat from the Progressive Conservatives, whose candidate was Ned Corrigal, a broadcaster for CFAC radio.[3] [4] He was re-elected with a smaller share of the popular vote in the 1967 general election.[5] On November 23, 1969, after being persuaded by Peter Lougheed, he left the Liberals and joined the Progressive Conservative caucus. The Alberta Liberals would not hold a seat again in Calgary until 1986.

In the 1971 Alberta general election Dickie won with 56% of the popular vote against Social Credit candidate and famous Alberta curler Ray Kingsmith.[6] After the election Premier Lougheed appointed Dickie the Minister of Mines and Minerals. He held that portfolio until he retired from the legislature at dissolution in 1975.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Date of birth from Biographical Register of the Alberta Legislature, from the Alberta Legislature Library
  2. ^ a b "Alderman Gallery" (PDF). City of Calgary. p. 149. Archived from the original (PDF) on September 27, 2007. Retrieved April 20, 2010. 
  3. ^ "Calgary Broadcasters - C". Radio West. Retrieved December 4, 2009. 
  4. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1963 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved December 4, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1967 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved December 4, 2009. 
  6. ^ "Calgary-Glenmore results 1971 Alberta general election". Alberta Heritage Community Foundation. Retrieved December 4, 2009. 

External links[edit]