Bill Glassford

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Bill Glassford
Bill Glassford.jpg
Glassford from 1951 Cornhusker
Sport(s) Football
Biographical details
Born (1914-03-08)March 8, 1914
Lancaster, Ohio
Died September 19, 2016(2016-09-19) (aged 102)
Scottsdale, Arizona
Alma mater University of Pittsburgh (1936)
Playing career
1934–1936 Pittsburgh
1937 Cincinnati Bengals (AFL II)
Position(s) Fullback, guard
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1937–1939 Manhattan (assistant)
1940–1941 Carnegie Tech (assistant)
1942 Yale (line)
1946–1948 New Hampshire
1949–1955 Nebraska
Head coaching record
Overall 50–40–4
Bowls 0–1
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
1 New England Conference (1946)
2 Yankee Conference (1947, 1948)

James William "Bill" Glassford (March 8, 1914 – September 19, 2016) was an American football player and coach. He attended the University of Pittsburgh where he played football earning first-team All-American status at guard. Born in Lancaster, Ohio,[1] he was a member of Phi Delta Theta Fraternity and graduated in 1936. He played for the Cincinnati Bengals of the second American Football League in 1937.[2] During World War II, Glassford served in the United States Navy.[3]

From 1946 to 1948, Glassford coached at the University of New Hampshire, where he compiled a 19–5–1 record. This includes an 8–1 record in 1947. From 1949 to 1955, he coached at the University of Nebraska–Lincoln, where he compiled a 31–35–3 record. In 1949 his team went 4–5, 6–2–1 in 1950, 2–8 in 1951, 5–4–1 in 1952, 3–6–1 in 1953, 6–5 in 1954, and 5–5 in 1955. His three winning seasons were the only winning seasons the school had between 1941 and 1961. He also coached three All-Americans in Tom Novak (1949), Bobby Reynolds (1950), and Jerry Minnick (1952). He led the school to its first ever Orange Bowl in 1955, where they lost to Duke, 34–7. He retired after the 1955 season and went into private business in Arizona. He was inducted into the Nebraska Football Hall of Fame in 2002[4] and turned 100 in 2014.[5] Glassford died in Scottsdale, Arizona at the age of 102, and was at that time the oldest still-living former pro player, and one of only seven total to have lived a century.[6][7]

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs Coaches# AP°
New Hampshire Wildcats (New England Conference) (1946)
1946 New Hampshire 6–1–1 3–0–1 1st
New Hampshire Wildcats (Yankee Conference) (1947–1948)
1947 New Hampshire 8–1 4–0 1st
1948 New Hampshire 5–3 3–1 1st
New Hampshire: 19–5–1 10–1–1
Nebraska Cornhuskers (Big Seven Conference) (1949–1955)
1949 Nebraska 4–5 3–3 T–3rd
1950 Nebraska 6–2–1 4–2 2nd 20 17
1951 Nebraska 2–8 2–4 T–4th
1952 Nebraska 5–4–1 3–2–1 3rd
1953 Nebraska 3–6–1 2–4 T–4th
1954 Nebraska 6–5 4–2 2nd L Orange
1955 Nebraska 5-5 5–1 2nd
Nebraska: 31–35–3 23–18–1
Total: 50–40–4
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title
#Rankings from final Coaches Poll.
°Rankings from final AP Poll.

References[edit]

External links[edit]