Bill Lohrman

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Bill Lohrman
Pitcher
Born: (1913-05-22)May 22, 1913
Brooklyn, New York
Died: August 13, 1999(1999-08-13) (aged 86)
Poughkeepsie, New York
Batted: Right Threw: Right
MLB debut
June 19, 1934, for the Philadelphia Phillies
Last MLB appearance
June 10, 1944, for the Cincinnati Reds
MLB statistics
Record 60-59
Earned run average 3.69
Strikeouts 330
Teams

Bill Lohrman (William Le Roy Lohrman) (May 22, 1913 in Brooklyn, New York – August 13, 1999) was a pitcher in Major League Baseball. He pitched in 198 games from 1934 to 1944. Bill played for the Giants, Dodgers, Cardinals, Phillies, and Reds. Bill was born and raised Brooklyn and went to live in New Paltz, NY following his baseball career.

Johnny Cooney's home run story[edit]

From the time of his debut in 1921, almost through the end of 1939, in a total of about 2,300 at-bats in the major leagues, Cooney never hit a home run. His first big league circuit clout came near the end of his 15th season. On Sept. 24, 1939, playing in the Polo Grounds, Cooney connected for a home run off Giants pitcher Harry Gumbert. The following day, with Bill Lohrman on the mound, Cooney hit another home run.

Johnny Mize Trade[edit]

During his first six seasons in the big leagues, all with the Cardinals, Mize won the 1939 batting crown, led the National League in home runs in 1939-40 and paced the NL in RBI in 1940, giving him the career Triple Crown along with two runner-up finishes in the Most Valuable Player Award voting by the end of his fifth big league campaign. After the 1941 season, Mize was traded to the New York Giants for Ken O'Dea, Bill Lohrman, Johnny McCarthy and $50,000.

Parade Grounds[edit]

Parade Grounds in Brooklyn, at the southernmost tip of Prospect Park, about a mile southwest of where Ebbets Field stood. Named for its use as a drill field for Union soldiers during the Civil War, the 40-acre Parade Grounds once had 13 baseball fields, some set so close to one another that center fielders in different games sometimes played 10 to 15 feet apart, often facing each other, Lawrence S. Ritter recalled in “East Side West Side: Tales of New York Sporting Life, 1910-1960” (1998). Among the future major leaguers who played there, Mr. Ritter wrote, were Koufax; Hoyt; Joe and Frank Torre; Bob and Ken Aspromonte; Cy Block; Chuck Connors, a k a “The Rifleman”; Harry Eisenstat; Sid Gordon; Buddy Hassett; Billy Jurges; Bill Lohrman; Sam Mele; Saul Rogovin; and Marius Russo.

Career Stats[edit]

Year Age Team Wins Losses W/L % ERA
1934 21 Philadelphia Phillies 0 1 0 4.5
1937 24 NY Giants 1 0 1 0.9
1938 25 NY Giants 9 6 0.6 3.32
1939 26 NY Giants 12 13 0.48 4.07
1940 27 NY Giants 10 15 0.4 3.78
1941 28 NY Giants 9 10 0.474 4.02
1942 29 TOT 14 5 0.737 2.48
1942 29 St. Louis Cardinals 1 1 0.5 1.42
1942 29 NY Giants 13 4 0.765 2.56
1943 30 TOT 5 8 0.385 4.75
1943 30 NY Giants 5 6 0.455 5.15
1943 30 Brooklyn Dodgers 0 2 0 3.58
1944 31 TOT 0 1 0 10.38
1944 31 Brooklyn Dodgers 0 0 0 0
1944 31 Cincinnati Reds

External links[edit]