Billboard Latin Music Award for Latin Jazz Album of the Year

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Billboard Latin Music Award for Latin Jazz Album of the Year
CountryUnited States
Presented byBillboard
First awarded1994
Last awarded2008
Most awardsArturo Sandoval (5)
Most nominationsPoncho Sanchez (8)
Websitebillboardevents.com

The Billboard Latin Music Award for Latin Jazz Album of the Year was an honor that was presented annually at the Billboard Latin Music Awards, a ceremony which honors "the most popular albums, songs, and performers in Latin music, as determined by the actual sales, radio airplay, streaming and social data that shapes Billboard's weekly charts".[1] Latin jazz is a form of jazz music which incorporates various sounds from Latin America.[2]

The accolade for Latin Jazz Album of the Year was first presented at the inaugural Billboard Latin Music Awards in 1994 to Uruguayan musician Roberto Perera's Dreams & Desires (1992).[3] From 1994 to 1998, only winners were announced at the conferences. Nominees were first presented in 1999 after Billboard began the Latin Music Awards on Telemundo. Cuban musician Arturo Sandoval is the most awarded artist with five wins. His records, Danzón (Dance On) (1994) and Hot House (1998), are both winners of the category, and also received the Grammy Award for Best Latin Jazz Album.[4][5] Latin Soul by Poncho Sanchez is the only record to have been nominated more than once. It was nominated in 2000 and won the award in 2001.[6][7] Chucho Valdés holds the record for the most nominations without a win, with four. The accolade was last presented in 2008 and discontinued a year later.[8]

Recipients[edit]

Man with glasses and a blue shirt is staring at the camera.
Uruguayan musician, Roberto Perera, first recipient of the award in 1994
A man with glasses is playing a trumpet in front of the camera.
Cuban musician Arturo Sandoval, the most awarded performer with five wins
Year Winner(s) Work Nominees Ref.
1994 Roberto Perera Dreams & Desires Nominations were not provided prior to 1999 [3]
1995 Arturo Sandoval Danzón (Dance On) [9]
1996 Arturo Sandoval Arturo Sandoval & The Latin Train [10]
1997 Tito Puente and La India with the Count Basie Orchestra Jazzin' [11]
1998 Herb Alpert Passion Dance [12]
1999 Arturo Sandoval Hot House [13]
2000 Los Hombres Calientes Los Hombres Calientes [6]
2001 Poncho Sanchez Latin Soul [7]
2002 Poncho Sanchez Latin Spirits [14]
2003 Gato Barbieri Shadow of the Cat [15]
[16]
2004 Arturo Sandoval Trumpet Evolution [17]
[18]
2005 Paco de Lucía Cositas Buenas [19]
[20]
2006 Arturo Sandoval Sandoval: Live at the Blue Note [21]
[22]
2007 Eliane Elias Around the City [23]
[24]
2008 Luciana Souza The New Bossa Nova [25]
[26]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Cobo, Leila (February 7, 2018). "J Balvin, Shakira, Luis Fonsi, Daddy Yankee, Ozuna & Maluma Lead 2018 Billboard Latin Music Awards Finalists". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. Archived from the original on June 13, 2018. Retrieved October 14, 2018.
  2. ^ Torres, George (2013). Encyclopedia of Latin American Popular Music. Greenwood. p. 224. ISBN 9780313087943. Retrieved 12 October 2018.
  3. ^ a b Lannert, John (May 21, 1994). "First Latin Music Awards Recognize Range of Talent". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 106 (21): LM-8. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved July 12, 2015.
  4. ^ "The 1995 Grammy winners". The New York Times. The New York Times Company. 3 March 1995. Archived from the original on 12 June 2013. Retrieved 9 October 2010.
  5. ^ "Here Are The Grammy Award Winners As Compiles By Associated Press". Chicago Tribune. Tronc. February 25, 1999. Archived from the original on October 11, 2018. Retrieved October 11, 2018.
  6. ^ a b Lannert, John (April 29, 2000). "Catch Some Rising Stars: Artist Showcases Offer a Glimpse Into The Future of Latin Music". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 112 (18): 16. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved May 9, 2012.
  7. ^ a b Cobo, Leila (April 28, 2001). "Billboard Awards Recognize The Best In Latin Music". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 113 (17): 56. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved April 29, 2013.
  8. ^ "Billboard Latin Music Awards 2009 Finalists". Telemundo. Archived from the original on July 5, 2017. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  9. ^ Lannert, John (June 10, 1995). "Award-Winners Show Diversity of Latin Music". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 107 (23): 54. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved March 23, 2014.
  10. ^ Lannert, John (May 4, 1996). "¡Que Viva La Música!". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 108 (18): L-3. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved June 11, 2013.
  11. ^ Lannert, John (May 3, 1997). "The Winners Are..." Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. 109 (18): LMQ-12. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved June 10, 2013.
  12. ^ Lannert, John (April 11, 1998). "Latin Music Award Winners, Include First-Timers, Familiar Faces". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media: LMQ-10. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved June 4, 2010.
  13. ^ Lannert, John (April 24, 1999). "10th Annual Latin Music Conference". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 111 (17): LM-32. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved March 6, 2016.
  14. ^ "2002 Billboard Latin Music Awards". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. May 10, 2002. Archived from the original on February 9, 2018. Retrieved July 12, 2017.
  15. ^ "2003 Billboard Latin Music Award Winners". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. May 9, 2003. Archived from the original on June 25, 2018. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  16. ^ "2003 Billboard Latin Awards Finalists". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. February 13, 2003. Archived from the original on January 30, 2018. Retrieved December 4, 2017.
  17. ^ "Lista de los Premios Billboard 2004 de la Musica Latina" (in Spanish). libertaddigital.com. April 30, 2004. Archived from the original on December 15, 2017. Retrieved December 14, 2017.
  18. ^ Cobo, Leila (February 21, 2004). "Billboard Latin Music Awards Finalists". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. 116 (8): 67. ISSN 0006-2510. Retrieved February 17, 2016.
  19. ^ "2005 Billboard Latin Music Awards Winners". Billboard. Nielsen Business Media. April 29, 2005. Archived from the original on June 14, 2018. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  20. ^ "2005 Billboard Latin Music Awards Finalists". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. February 11, 2005. Archived from the original on June 24, 2018. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  21. ^ "2006 Billboard Latin Music Awards Winners". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. April 28, 2006. Archived from the original on September 23, 2018. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  22. ^ "2006 Billboard Latin Music Awards Finalists". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. February 16, 2006. Archived from the original on February 19, 2017. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  23. ^ "2007 Billboard Latin Music Awards Winners". Billboard. April 27, 2007. Archived from the original on June 23, 2018. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  24. ^ "2007 Billboard Latin Music Awards Finalists". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. February 14, 2007. Archived from the original on June 22, 2018. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  25. ^ "2008 Billboard Latin Music Awards Winners". Billboard. Prometheus Global Media. April 11, 2008. Archived from the original on July 5, 2018. Retrieved April 29, 2017.
  26. ^ "Finalistas a los premios Latin Billboard". El Nuevo Heraldo (in Spanish). February 6, 2008. Archived from the original on October 10, 2018. Retrieved October 10, 2018.