Billy Goldenberg

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William Leon Goldenberg (born February 10, 1936, Brooklyn) is an American composer and songwriter, best-known for his work on television and film.[1]

Among his most noteworthy were his collaborations with Steven Spielberg on his telefilms (in particular, Night Gallery in 1969, and Duel in 1971) and his seven-episode contribution toward the NBC Mystery Movie detective series Columbo. He composed the themes for several popular television programs, including Kojak, Alias Smith and Jones, Banacek, Rhoda and Our House. He composed the scores to countless films and TV movies including Fear No Evil (1969), Ritual of Evil (1970), The Grasshopper (1970), Red Sky at Morning (1971), Up the Sandbox (1972), The Last of Sheila (1973), Don't Be Afraid of the Dark (1973), Busting (1974), Reflections of Murder (1974), The Legend of Lizzie Borden (1975), James Dean (1976), One of My Wives Is Missing (1976), The Lindbergh Kidnapping Case (1976), Helter Skelter (1976), The Domino Principle (1977), Mary Jane Harper Cried Last Night (1977), The Cracker Factory (1979), Scavenger Hunt (1979), This House Possessed (1981), The Best Little Girl in the World (1981), Reuben, Reuben (1983), Kane & Abel (1985), Good to Go (1986), 18 Again! (1988), Around the World in 80 Days (1989) and Chernobyl: The Final Warning (1991).

Goldenberg served as Musical Director for Elvis Presley's Comeback Special, The Ann-Margret Show, An Evening with Diana Ross and others. He received an Emmy Award in 1975 for the CBS miniseries Benjamin Franklin and again in 1978 for the NBC miniseries King. He has received 22 Emmy nominations in total.[citation needed]

Goldenberg served as musical accompanist for An Evening with Elaine May and Mike Nichols. He was also the composer of the Michael Bennett-directed Broadway musical Ballroom, based on the television special Queen of the Stardust Ballroom, which he also composed.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Corry, John (December 10, 1978). "The Footwork Behind 'Ballroom'". The New York Times. 

External links[edit]