Billy Taylor (basketball)

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Billy Taylor
Sport(s) Basketball
Biographical details
Born (1973-06-12) June 12, 1973 (age 43)
Playing career
1991–1995 Notre Dame
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1998–1999 Notre Dame (asst.)
1999–2002 UNC Greensboro (asst.)
2002–2007 Lehigh
2007–2013 Ball State
2013–2016 Iowa (asst.)
Head coaching record
Overall 165-168
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
Patriot League Tournament Championship (2004)
Patriot League Regular Season Championship (2004)
Awards
Patriot League Coach of the Year (2003, 2004)

Billy Taylor (born June 12, 1973) is an American college basketball coach and the former head men's basketball coach at Ball State University. He previously held the same position at Lehigh University.

He was an Honor Roll student and commencement speaker at West Aurora High School in Aurora, Illinois, and was recruited by Digger Phelps to play at Notre Dame, though he played under John MacLeod. After spending three years working for Arthur Andersen and earning his CPA, he took an assistant coaching position under MacLeod at Notre Dame in 1998. One year later he followed former Lehigh head coach Fran McCaffery to UNC-Greensboro.[1]

In 2002 he was offered the head coaching position at Lehigh. In his inaugural campaign, Taylor become the all-time winningest first-year coach in Lehigh history. Coach Taylor and the Mountain Hawks surprised many by winning 16 games, including eight in the Patriot League. Their eleven-game improvement over the year before was the second best in all of Division I. For his outstanding efforts, Taylor earned the 2002–03 Patriot League Coach of the Year honors in voting by the league coaches. In 2003-04, Taylor led Lehigh to its first-ever Patriot League regular season and tournament championships, as well as a trip to the NCAA tournament. For his efforts, Taylor earned the league's Coach of the Year honor for the second time in as many seasons, becoming the first coach since Gonzaga's Mark Few to win conference coach of the year honors in each of his first two seasons as a head coach.

In 2005-06, Lehigh posted the third-most wins in school history with its 19-12 overall mark and a school-record 11 Patriot League wins.

In August 2007 he was offered and took the head coaching position at Ball State University. During his six seasons at Ball State (2007–13), the Cardinals finished either first or second in the Mid-American Conference (MAC) West Division three times and advanced to the MAC Tournament semifinals twice. Taylor coached nine all-conference selections and also mentored a MAC All-Freshman Team member five straight seasons.

Taylor rejoined Fran McCaffery prior to the 2013-14 season at the University of Iowa. Taylor has been on the Hawkeyes staff of back-to-back NCAA Tournament teams (2013–14 and 2014–15). For 2014-15, University of Iowa advanced to the Round of 32 after posting its largest margin of victory ever in an NCAA Tournament game (31-point win over Davidson).The Hawkeyes have produced back-to-back first-team All-Big Ten honorees and NBA Draft selections (Roy Devyn Marble in 2014 and Aaron White in 2015) while on staff.

In June 2016, Taylor was hired as the head basketball coach at Belmont Abbey College located in Belmont, NC.

Head coaching record[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Lehigh (Patriot League) (2002–2007)
2002–03 Lehigh 16–12 8–6 4th
2003–04 Lehigh 20–11 10–4 T–1st NCAA Opening Round
2004–05 Lehigh 14-15 7-7 T-4th
2005–06 Lehigh 19–12 11–3 T–2nd
2006–07 Lehigh 12–19 7–7 T–3rd
Lehigh: 81-69 43-27
Ball State (Mid-American Conference) (2007–2013)
2007–08 Ball State 6–24 5–11
2008–09 Ball State 14–17 7–9
2009–10 Ball State 15–15 8–8
2010–11 Ball State 19–13 10-6
2011–12 Ball State 15–15 6–10
2012–13 Ball State 15–15 8-8
Ball State: 84–99 44-52
Total: 165-168

      National champion         Postseason invitational champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

References[edit]

  1. ^ Taylor Made; Ball State Daily News