Patbingsu

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Patbingsu
Patbingsu.jpg
Alternative names Bingsu
Type Shaved ice
Course Dessert
Place of origin Korea
Serving temperature Cold
Main ingredients Shaved ice, red beans
Variations Nokcha-bingsu (green tea bingsu), ttalgi-bingsu (strawberry bingsu), choko-bingsu (chocolate bingsu), etc.
Cookbook: Patbingsu  Media: Patbingsu
Korean name
Hangul 팥빙수 / 빙수
Hanja -氷水 / 氷水
Revised Romanization patbingsu / bingsu
McCune–Reischauer p'atpingsu / pingsu
IPA [pʰat̚.p͈iŋ.su] / [piŋ.su]

Patbingsu (팥빙수, sometimes anglicized as patbingsoo, literally "red beans shaved ice") is a popular Korean shaved ice dessert with sweet toppings that may include chopped fruit, condensed milk, fruit syrup, and red beans.[1] Varieties with ingredients other than red beans are called bingsu[2] (or bingsoo).[3]

The food originally began as ice shavings with red bean paste (known as pat, ). Many varieties of patbingsu exist in contemporary culture.

History[edit]

The early forms of patbingsu consisted of shaved ice and two or three ingredients, typically red bean paste, tteok, and ground nut powder.[4] The earliest forms of patbingsu existed during the Joseon Dynasty (1392–1910). Government records show officials sharing crushed ice topped with various fruits.[5][6]

The modern forms of patbingsu are reputed to have originated during the period of Korea under Japanese rule (1910–1945) with the introduction of a cold dish featuring red bean paste.[5][6] The combination of red bean paste and shaved ice is a Korean invention.[7] During the Korean War (1950–1953), foreign influence led to the inclusion of ingredients such as fruit cocktail, ice cream,[8] fruits, nuts, cereal, syrups, and whipped cream.[7] In the 1970s and 1980s, popular ingredients included fruit cocktail, whipped cream, and maraschino cherries.[8]

Variations[edit]

There are a variety of patbingsu types and flavors. Many bingsus do not necessarily follow tradition, and some do not include the red bean paste.[9] Some popular flavors are: green tea, coffee, and yogurt.[10]

Availability[edit]

Patbingsu can be found at most fast food restaurants, cafes, and bakeries in South Korea.[1] Patbingsu is also a very popular dessert at cafes in the Koreatowns of Vancouver, New York City, Los Angeles, and Atlanta.[11]

Gallery[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Lee, Robyn (June 5, 2009). "Snapshots from South Korea: Patbingsu, a Popular Shaved Ice Dessert". Serious Eats. Retrieved January 5, 2013. 
  2. ^ CNN, By Kyoung Woo Jun, for. "Seoul hotels at war over dessert - CNN.com". CNN. Retrieved 2016-05-05. 
  3. ^ Hoo, Winyan Soo (2014-07-16). "Plate Lab: A guide to Asian shaved ice desserts halo-halo, bao-bing and bingsoo". The Washington Post. ISSN 0190-8286. Retrieved 2016-05-05. 
  4. ^ Min, Ines (June 3, 2010). "Ice cream explorations and a peek into the past". The Korea Times. Retrieved January 5, 2014. 
  5. ^ a b Dang, Tae Keuk (September 13, 2010). "Snowy delights and variations on bingsu". Herald Corporation. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  6. ^ a b 팥빙수[氷水] [Patbingsu]. Doopedia (in Korean). Doosan Corporation. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  7. ^ a b Comeau, Kimberly (September 27, 2011). "Get ready for patbingsu: Red beans over shaved ice". The Jeju Weekly. jeju weekly.com. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  8. ^ a b Imatome-Yun, Naomi. "Shaved Ice Dessert with Sweet Beans Recipe (Patbingsu)". About.com. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  9. ^ "Bingsu, an unbeatable summer treat!". KOREA TOURISM ORGANIZATION. Retrieved January 6, 2014. 
  10. ^ Lee, Ji-yoon (July 7, 2008). "Korea's cold summer taste - naengmyeon and patbingsu". Korea.net. The Korean Culture and Information Service. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 
  11. ^ Amter, Charlie. "A game of top this in frozen yogurt wars". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on April 4, 2009. Retrieved January 6, 2013. 

External links[edit]