Binn idir an dá Log

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Binn idir an dá Log
Binn idir an da Log, Maumturks.jpg
Northwest face and corrie lake of Lough Maumahoge, as viewed from Knocknahillion
Highest point
Elevation702 m (2,303 ft) [1]
Prominence644 m (2,113 ft) [1]
ListingP600, 100 Highest Irish Mountains, Marilyn, Hewitt, Arderin, Simm, Vandeleur-Lynam
Coordinates53°30′50″N 9°40′36″W / 53.513853°N 9.676749°W / 53.513853; -9.676749Coordinates: 53°30′50″N 9°40′36″W / 53.513853°N 9.676749°W / 53.513853; -9.676749[1]
Naming
English translationpeak between two hollows
Language of nameIrish
Geography
Binn idir an dá Log is located in island of Ireland
Binn idir an dá Log
Binn idir an dá Log
Location in Ireland
LocationCounty Galway, Republic of Ireland
Parent rangeMaumturks
OSI/OSNI gridL8881952827
Topo mapOSi Discovery 37
Geology
Type of rockPale quartzites, grits, graphitic top bedrock[1]
Climbing
Easiest routeVia pass of Maumahoge

Binn idir an dá Log (Irish: Binn idir an dá Log, meaning "peak between the hollows")[2] at 702 metres (2,303 ft), is the 87th–highest peak in Ireland on the Arderin scale,[3] and the 108th–highest peak on the Vandeleur-Lynam scale.[4][5] Binn idir an dá Log is situated at the centre of the long north-west to south-east cental spine of the Maumturks mountain range in the Connemara National Park in Galway, Ireland. Binn idir an dá Log is the tallest mountain in the range.[5][6]

Naming[edit]

Binn idir and dá Log derives its name from the two glacial corries that bound each end of its high rocky summit ridge (the north-western corrie is a lake).[2][6]

Binn idir an dá Log is sometimes incorrectly named as "Barrslievenaroy" (or "Baurslievenaroy") (Irish: Barrshliabh na Ráthadh; the mountain fort),[7][8] which is a small townland on the northern slopes of the mountain that is marked in some Ordnance Survey Ireland maps.[9][8] The Placenames Database of Ireland records an anglicised version as "Benadolug", however, this does not appear in other noted Irish mountain placename reference guides.[10][2]

Geography[edit]

Binn idir an dá Log lies at the centre of the long north-west to south-east central spine of the Maumturks range in the Connemara National Park. The mountain has a high winding rocky summit ridge, littered in quartzite rocks and gravel, that includes the subsidiary peak of Binn idir an dá Log SE Top at 659 metres (2,162 ft). To the southeast of the summit ridge is a large corrie (and the townland of Barrslievenaroy below), and then the 4th highest Maumturk of Binn Chaonaigh at 633 metres (2,077 ft).[6][11][5]

To the northwest of the summit ridge is an even larger corrie lake (at L 879536), with steep cliffs on its backwall, which then rises up again to the summit of Knocknahillion at 607 metres (1,991 ft). The col between Binn idir an dá Log and Knocknahillion is the pass of Maumahoge (Irish: Mhám Ochóige,[12] and the corrie lake is called Lough Maumahoge (Irish: Loch Mhám Ochóige).[6][11][5]

Binn idir an dá Log's prominence of 644 metres (2,113 ft) qualifies it as a P600, and a Marilyn, and it also ranks it as the 52nd-highest mountain in Ireland on the MountainViews Online Database, 100 Highest Irish Mountains, where the minimum prominence threshold is 100 metres.[13][5]

Hill walking[edit]

The easiest way summit Binn idir an dá Log is a 6-kilometre 3-hour route via the pass of Maumahoge; however, because of its positioning on the high rocky central spine of the central Maumturk range, it is also summited in a longer 13-kilometre 5-6 hour loop-route starting at the col of Maumeen Irish: Máméan, in the south, climbing Binn Chaonaigh and then onto the top of Binn idir an dá Log, before descending via Maumahoge, and walking back.[11][6][14][15]

Binn idir an dá Log is also climbed as part of the Maamturks Challenge, a 25-kilometre 10–12 hour walk over the full Maumturks range (from Maam Cross to Leenaun), which is considered one of the "great classic ridge-walks of Ireland",[11] but of "extreme grade" due to the circa 7,600 feet of total ascent.[14]

Since 1975, the University College Galway Mountaineering Club, has run the annual "Maamturks Challenge Walk" (MCW),[16] and man two checkpoints on Binn idir an dá Log; one at the summit (the summit marks 54% of MCW climbing completed),[17] and another at Lough Maumahoge (the Lough marks 63% of MCW climbing, and 51% of MCW distance, completed), which has a 2pm cut-off time for participants.[18][17]

Rock climbing[edit]

While the Maumturks range is not particularly known for rock climbing routes (unlike Bencorr and its Carrot Ridge spur, across the Inagh Valley), some have been developed at a crag just below and west of Lough Maumahoge (L876 532), with routes of 90 to 190 metres at climbing grades of S to HVS.[19]

Gallery[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Fairbairn, Helen (2014). Ireland's Best Walks: A Walking Guide. Collins Press. ISBN 978-1848892118.
  • MountainViews Online Database (Simon Stewart) (2013). A Guide to Ireland's Mountain Summits: The Vandeleur-Lynams & the Arderins. Collins Books. ISBN 978-1-84889-164-7.
  • Paul Phelan (2011). Connemara & Mayo - A Walking Guide: Mountain, Coastal & Island Walks. Collins Press. ISBN 978-1848891029.
  • Dillion, Paddy (2001). Connemara: Collins Rambler's guide. Harper Collins. ISBN 978-0002201216.
  • Dillion, Paddy (1993). The Mountains of Ireland: A Guide to Walking the Summits. Cicerone. ISBN 978-1852841102.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d "Binn idir an dá Log". MountainViews Online Database. Retrieved 1 August 2019.
  2. ^ a b c Paul Tempan (February 2012). "Irish Hill and Mountain Names" (PDF). MountainViews.ie.
  3. ^ Simon Stewart (October 2018). "Arderins: Irish mountains of 500+m with a prominence of 30m". MountainViews Online Database.
  4. ^ Simon Stewart (October 2018). "Vandeleur-Lynams: Irish mountains of 600+m with a prominence of 15m". MountainViews Online Database.
  5. ^ a b c d e Mountainviews, (September 2013), "A Guide to Ireland's Mountain Summits: The Vandeleur-Lynams & the Arderins", Collins Books, Cork, ISBN 978-1-84889-164-7
  6. ^ a b c d e Dillion, Paddy (2001). Connemara: Collins Rambler's guide. Harper Collins. ISBN 978-0002201216. Walk 16: Máméan and Binn Idir an Dá Log
  7. ^ "Ordnance Survey Ireland - Online map viewer". Archived from the original on 2012-08-29. Retrieved 2010-07-28.
  8. ^ a b "Townland: Barrshliabh na Ráthadh (Barrslievenaroy)". Placenames Database of Ireland. Retrieved 1 August 2019. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  9. ^ "Townland: Baurslievenaroy Townland, Co. Galway". townland.ie. 2018.
  10. ^ "Binn idir an Dá Log (Benadolug)". Placenames Database of Ireland. Retrieved 1 August 2019. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  11. ^ a b c d Fairbairn, Helen (2014). Ireland's Best Walks: A Walking Guide. Collins Press. ISBN 978-1848892118. Retrieved 1 August 2019. Route 36: The Central Maumturks – South
  12. ^ "Mountain Pass: Mám Ochóige (Maumahoge)". Placenames Database of Ireland. Retrieved 1 August 2019. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  13. ^ "Irish Highest 100: The highest 100 Irish mountains with a prominence of +100m". MountainViews Online Database. September 2018.
  14. ^ a b Paul Phelan (2011). Connemara & Mayo - A Walking Guide: Mountain, Coastal & Island Walks. Collins Press. ISBN 978-1848891029. Route 18: Maumeen to Mumahoge
  15. ^ Tony Doherty (18 January 2017). "Walk for the weekend: The Irish Kilimanjaro: Maumturks and Binn idir an da Log". Irish Times. Retrieved 2 August 2019.
  16. ^ "The Maumturks Challenge". University College Galway Mountaineering Club (UCGMC). Retrieved 1 August 2019. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  17. ^ a b Simon Stewart. "Maumturks Challenge Section 2: Maumeen to Mumahoge". MountainViews Online Database. Retrieved 2 August 2019. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  18. ^ "Maaumturks Challenge: The Route". University College Galway Mountaineering Club (UCGMC). Retrieved 2 August 2019. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)
  19. ^ "Maamturks: Mám Ochóige". Irish Online Climbing Wiki. Retrieved 2 August 2019. Italic or bold markup not allowed in: |publisher= (help)

External links[edit]