Biographical Information Blanks

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Biographical Information Blank (BIB) is a type of assessment that uses biodata in employee recruitment to help determine which of several candidates should be hired for a job. Originally companies would take the information from their job applications forms to see what would be useful in predicting the job performance of employees.[1] Over time the amount and type of biographical information collected expanded and was put into the BIB assessments we find today.[2] The modern BIB is a self-report instrument that includes questions about past personal and work experiences, as well as interests, opinions, values and attitudes. Its items are all presented in the multiple choice format. The emphasis is on past behaviors because they are best predictors of future behaviors.[3] Typically, BIBs are designed to predict success in a particular job because they contribute to a predictor sample, which is used to make personnel selection decisions.

There are two types of BIBs: the empirical and the rational.[4] With the empirical BIB, each item is correlated with a measure of job performance or other criterion of job success. Those items that can predict job success are retained for the BIB. The rationale approach is to start with a job analysis to determine the knowledge, skill, ability, and other job characteristics (KSAOs) needed for the job. Items are chosen that reflect the required KSAOs.

A great deal of research has shown that BIBs are able to predict job success.[5] Both types of BIBs, the empirical and the rational seem to work equally well.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Schmitt, N., & Chan, D. (1998). Personnel selection: A theoretical approach. Thousand Oaks: CA: Sage.
  2. ^ Schmitt, N., & Chan, D. (1998). Personnel selection: A theoretical approach. Thousand Oaks: CA: Sage.
  3. ^ Cascio, W. F., & Aguinis, H. (2010). Applied Psychology in Human Resource Management, Prentice Hall.
  4. ^ Stokes, G. S., & Searcy, C. A. (1999). Specification of scales in biodata form development: Rational vs. empirical and global vs. specific. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 7(2), 72-85.
  5. ^ Breaugh, J. A. (2009). The use of biodata for employee selection: Past research and future directions. Human Resource Management Review, 19(3), 219-231.
  6. ^ Stokes, G. S., & Searcy, C. A. (1999). Specification of scales in biodata form development: Rational vs. empirical and global vs. specific. International Journal of Selection and Assessment, 7(2), 72-85.