Biomechanical engineering

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Biomechanics is the study of biological systems such as the human body, combined with the study of mechanics, or mechanical applications. Using the skills learned from biology, engineering and physics to research and develop for health care, such as organs that have been made from artificial materials, or new advances with prosthetic limbs. The creation of biomaterial, which is a fake material that can be integrated into living tissue or can live in sync with biological material, is one of the biggest advances in medicine to this day. Those in this field might also hold the job of not only installing, but also adjusting, maintain, repairing, and providing technical help for all the biomaterial.

Biomechanical engineering is a bioengineering subdiscipline, which applies principles of mechanical engineering to biological systems and stems from the scientific discipline of biomechanics. Topics of interest in the field include biomedical engineering and agricultural engineering. Biomechanics, specificaly, is the study of biological systems such as the human body, combined with the study of mechanics, or mechanical applications. Using the skills learned from biology, engineering and physics to research and develop for health care, such as organs that have been made from artificial materials, or new advances with prosthetic limbs. The creation of biomaterial, which is a fake material that can be integrated into living tissue or can live in sync with biological material, is one of the biggest advances in medicine to this day. Those in this field might also hold the job of not only installing, but also adjusting, maintain, repairing, and providing technical help for all the biomaterial.

Specific fields of Biomechanical Engineering

1.   Neural Engineering

a.    This field accesses the brain interface by using sensors attached to the scalp. It picks up on all the different signals and gets mapped.

2.   Wearable Technology

a.    New advancements include wearable scanners that allow different required measurements to better monitor someone’s health

3.   Tissue Engineering

a.    Whole parts of a body can be recovered in skin made from synthetic growing material, allowing those who had burn trauma, or other trauma to regain skin.

4.   Microbubbles

a.    Little bubbles that allow micro sized medicine to be delivered to specific parts of the body, like a tumor, which allows other parts of the body to not get affected by a lot of the harmful chemicals that might harm the other parts. This advancement could make medicine delivery one of the safest things. The isolation of the medicine to a singular part of the body might also be able to prevent accidental overdose.

Examples of jobs done by biomechanical engineers

1.   Advancement of pacemakers, fake kidney replacement, fake hearts, and even new joints or limbs

2.   New advancement for hospital monitoring systems, to better and more accurately monitor human health.

Schools that offer this major

1.   Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge

2.   Stanford University

3.   Johns Hopkins University

4.   Georgia Institute

5.   UC San Diego

6.   Duke University

7.   UC Berkeley

8.   Boston University

9.   Rice University    

UC Berkeley

UC Berkeley and the associates working there have been accredited with making many of the advances in the Biomechanical field in the past decade. UC Berkley’s program in Bioengineering has primarily focused their studies toward applying the engineering they learn to the healthcare of the future for society.

            Bioengineering brains at UC Berkeley

1.    Tony M. Keven- Studies the behavior of bones in a mechanical aspect

a.    His biggest research right now is the study of the human spine. Specifically, the study of a full spinal disc replacement.

2.    Mohammad Mourad- Cardiovascular Biomechanics

3.    Lisa Pruitt- Orthopedic Tissues

a.    Her current projects are as follows: fatigue fractures, and characterizing specific orthopedic tissues and other things.

Stanford University

The program at Stanford for biomechanical Engineering combines a lot of biology and medicine advances with the engineering side of it, creating advances in the fields of hearing, vision, and even biomaterials.

Research Groups[edit]