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In ecology, bionomics (Greek: bio = life; nomos = law) is the comprehensive study of an organism and its relation to its environment. As translated from the French word Bionomie, its first use in English was in the period of 1885-1890. Another way of expressing this word is the term currently referred to as "ecology". It is sometimes used as a subdiscipline of Ecological economics. An example of studies of this type is Richard B. Selander's Bionomics, Systematics and Phylogeny of Lytta, a Genus of Blister Beetles (Coleoptera, Meloidae), Illinois Biological Monographs: number 28, 1960. Michael Rothschild used the term in his book, but does not make reference to prior uses.

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