Birmingham Hall Green (UK Parliament constituency)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Coordinates: 52°26′N 1°50′W / 52.43°N 1.84°W / 52.43; -1.84

Birmingham Hall Green
Borough constituency
for the House of Commons
Outline map
Boundary of Birmingham Hall Green in Birmingham.
Outline map
Location of Birmingham within England.
County West Midlands
Population 115,904 (2011 census)[1]
Electorate 77,157 (December 2010)[2]
Current constituency
Created 1950
Member of parliament Roger Godsiff (Labour)
Number of members One
Created from Birmingham Acock's Green and Birmingham Moseley
Overlaps
European Parliament constituency West Midlands

Birmingham Hall Green is a parliamentary constituency[n 1] in city of Birmingham, which has been represented in the House of Commons of the UK Parliament since 2010 by Roger Godsiff of the Labour Party.[n 2]

It is generally considered a Labour safe seat, having the twelfth-largest majority in the UK (by percentage) with a vote share for Labour of 77.6% and majority of 62.5%, as of 2017. [3]

Members of Parliament[edit]

Election Member[4] Party Notes
2010 Roger Godsiff Labour
1997 Steve McCabe Labour
1987 Andrew Hargreaves Conservative
1965 by-election Reginald Eyre Conservative
1950 Aubrey Jones Conservative Resigned 1965

Boundaries and constituency profile[edit]

2010–present: The City of Birmingham wards of Hall Green, Moseley and King's Heath, Sparkbrook, and Springfield.

1983–2010: The City of Birmingham wards of Billesley, Brandwood, and Hall Green.

1974–1983: The County Borough of Birmingham wards of Billesley, Brandwood, and Hall Green.

1955–1974: The County Borough of Birmingham wards of Brandwood, Hall Green, and Springfield.

1950–1955: The County Borough of Birmingham wards of Hall Green, Sparkhill and Springfield.[5]

The constituency is a suburban seat on the fringes city centre to its south and bordering Solihull in the east. The number of non-whites (9.3%) is low compared to the rest of the city, as is the proportion of social housing (25.7%), figures higher than the national average. The area is home to a high number of public parks, open space and numerous tree-lined streets.[6][7]

A famous landmark is Sarehole Mill, where J. R. R. Tolkien spent his boyhood, and which provided the inspiration for The Hobbit and The Lord of the Rings.

Many constituents were employed in the car industry – notably Rover's nearby factories which have now closed down.

Following the Fifth Periodic Review of Westminster constituencies, the Boundary Commission for England created a modified version of the Hall Green seat which contains a third of the constituency which existed for the 1997 general election and new additions – the retained former ward is Hall Green itself – and additional wards include two from the Birmingham, Sparkbrook and Small Heath which was abolished at the 2010 general glection.

History[edit]

Summary of results

The 2015 result made the seat the 28th safest of Labour's 232 seats by percentage of majority.[8]

The 2017 result made it the 12th safest seat in the UK, with a majority of 62.5% of the vote.[3]

Hall Green, on various boundaries, elected a Conservative MP throughout the period from 1950 to 1997 and formed with Birmingham, Edgbaston the last of the Birmingham seats during the 1979–1997 Conservative Governments lost to Labour, in 1997. This was the first time a Labour candidate had won the seat as it was created in 1950. The 2015 result saw a +26.9% swing to the Labour Party and a correspondingly much greater than national average swing away from the Liberal Democrat candidate.

Turnout

Turnout has ranged from 83.1% in 1950 to 57.5% in 2001.

Elections[edit]

Elections in the 2010s[edit]

General Election 2017: Birmingham Hall Green[9][10]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Roger Godsiff 42,143 77.6 Increase 17.8
Conservative Reena Ranger 8,199 15.1 Decrease 2.6
Liberal Democrat Jerry Evans 3,137 5.8 Decrease 5.8
Green Patrick Cox 831 1.5 Decrease 3.1
Majority 33,944 62.5 Increase 20.4
Turnout 54,310 69.4 Increase 7.8
Labour hold Swing Increase 10.2
General Election 2015: Birmingham Hall Green[11]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Roger Godsiff 28,147 59.8 Increase 24.9
Conservative James Bird 8,329 17.7 Increase 2.7
Liberal Democrat Jerry Evans 5,459 11.6 Decrease 13.0
Green Elly Stanton 2,200 4.7 N/A
UKIP Rashpal Mondair 2,131 4.5 Increase 2.6
Respect Shiraz Peer 780 1.7 Decrease 23.5
Majority 19,818 42.1 Increase 34.3
Turnout 47,046 61.6 Decrease 2.0
Labour hold Swing Increase 12.1
General Election 2010: Birmingham Hall Green[12][13]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Roger Godsiff 16,039 32.9 Decrease 14.3
Respect Salma Yaqoob 12,240 25.1 Increase 25.1
Liberal Democrat Jerry Evans 11,988 24.6 Increase 5.3
Conservative Jo Barker 7,320 15.0 Decrease 15.7
UKIP Alan Blumenthal 950 1.9 Decrease 0.9
Independent Andrew Gardner 190 0.4 Increase 0.4
Majority 3,799 7.8 Decrease 8.7
Turnout 48,727 63.6 Increase 3.2
Labour hold Swing 11.7

Elections in the 2000s[edit]

General Election 2005: Birmingham Hall Green[14]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Steve McCabe 16,304 47.2 Decrease 7.4
Conservative Eddie Hughes 10,590 30.7 Decrease 3.8
Liberal Democrat Roger Harmer 6,682 19.3 Increase 10.5
UKIP David Melhuish 960 2.8 Increase 0.7
Majority 5,714 16.5 Decrease 3.6
Turnout 34,536 60.4 Increase 2.9
Labour hold Swing Decrease 1.8
General Election 2001: Birmingham Hall Green[15]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Steve McCabe 18,049 54.6 Increase 1.1
Conservative Chris White 11,401 34.5 Increase 1.1
Liberal Democrat Punjab Singh 2,926 8.8 Decrease 0.8
UKIP Peter Johnson 708 2.1 N/A
Majority 6,648 20.1
Turnout 33,084 57.5 Decrease 13.7
Labour hold Swing

Elections in the 1990s[edit]

General Election 1997: Birmingham Hall Green[16]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Labour Steve McCabe 22,372 53.5 Increase 15.2
Conservative Andrew Hargreaves 13,952 33.4 Decrease 12.7
Liberal Democrat Alastair Dow 4,034 9.6 Decrease 6.0
Referendum Paul Bennett 1,461 3.5 N/A
Majority 8,420 20.1
Turnout 41,819 71.2
Labour gain from Conservative Swing Increase 14.0
General Election 1992: Birmingham Hall Green[17][18]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Andrew Hargreaves 21,649 46.1 Increase 1.2
Labour Jane Slowey 17,984 38.3 Increase 10.1
Liberal Democrat David Andrew McGrath 7,342 15.6 Decrease 11.4
Majority 3,665 7.8 Decrease 8.9
Turnout 46,975 78.2 Increase 3.5
Conservative hold Swing Decrease 4.4

Elections in the 1980s[edit]

General Election 1987: Birmingham Hall Green[19][20]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Andrew Hargreaves 20,478 44.9 Decrease 4.2
Labour Frances Eveline Brook 12,857 28.2 Increase 0.9
Social Democratic Francis Michael Wilkes 12,323 27.0 Increase 3.4
Majority 7,621 16.7 Decrease 8.9
Turnout 45,658 74.7
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1983: Birmingham Hall Green[21][22]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Reginald Eyre 21,142 49.1
Labour Martin Henry Willis 11,769 27.3
Liberal John Hemming 10,175 23.6
Majority 9,373 21.8
Turnout 43,086 70.6
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1970s[edit]

General Election 1979: Birmingham Hall Green[23]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Reginald Eyre 27,072 54.5
Labour T.J. Stewart 17,508 35.3
Liberal P.M. Lockyer 4,440 9.0
National Front R Maylin 615 1.2
Majority 9,564 19.3
Turnout 73.3
Conservative hold Swing
General Election October 1974: Birmingham, Hall Green[24]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Reginald Eyre 20,569 43.7
Labour T.J. Stewart 17,945 38.1
Liberal I. Powney 8,532 18.1
Majority 2,624 5.6
Turnout 70.2
Conservative hold Swing
General Election February 1974: Birmingham, Hall Green[25]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Reginald Eyre 27,280 56.5
Labour David Jamieson 21,036 43.5
Majority 6,244 12.9
Turnout 72.6
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1970: Birmingham, Hall Green[26]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Reginald Eyre 27,319 60.4
Labour T.L. Keene 17,930 39.6
Majority 9,389 20.7
Turnout 67.7
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1960s[edit]

General Election 1966: Birmingham, Hall Green[27][28]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Reginald Eyre 20,628 47.4
Labour George S Jonas 17,295 39.7
Liberal John Green 5,617 12.9
Majority 3,333 7.6
Turnout 73.6
Conservative hold Swing
By-election 1965: Birmingham Hall Green
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Reginald Eyre 17,130 54.8 Increase 2.3
Labour David Mumford 8,980 28.8 Decrease 3.0
Liberal Penelope Jessel 5,122 16.4 Increase 0.8
Majority 8,150 26.0
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1964: Birmingham, Hall Green[29][30]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Aubrey Jones 23,879 52.5
Labour Graham S Rea 14,477 31.8
Liberal Penelope Jessel 7,113 15.6
Majority 9,402 20.7
Turnout 75.8
Conservative hold Swing

Elections in the 1950s[edit]

General Election 1959: Birmingham, Hall Green[31][32]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Aubrey Jones 29,148 62.6
Labour Deryck HV Fereday 15,431 33.2
Independent Conservative Harry W Maynard 1,955 4.2
Majority 13,717 29.5
Turnout 76.2
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1955: Birmingham, Hall Green[33][34]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Aubrey Jones 28,543 61.5
Labour William JS Pringle 17,846 38.5
Majority 10,697 23.1
Turnout 75.3
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1951: Birmingham, Hall Green[35][36]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Aubrey Jones 27,289 56.7
Labour Thomas Crehan 20,874 43.3
Majority 6,415 13.3
Turnout 82.9
Conservative hold Swing
General Election 1950: Birmingham, Hall Green[37]
Party Candidate Votes % ±
Conservative Aubrey Jones 24,444 50.2
Labour Thomas Crehan 20,591 42.2
Liberal GL Roy 3,703 7.6
Majority 5,472 11.4
Turnout 83.1
Conservative hold Swing

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

Notes
  1. ^ A borough constituency (for the purposes of election expenses and type of returning officer)
  2. ^ As with all constituencies, the constituency elects one Member of Parliament (MP) by the first past the post system of election at least every five years.
References
  1. ^ "Birmingham, Hall Green: Usual Resident Population, 2011". Neighbourhood Statistics. Office for National Statistics. Retrieved 30 January 2015. 
  2. ^ "Electorate Figures – Boundary Commission for England". 2011 Electorate Figures. Boundary Commission for England. 4 March 2011. Archived from the original on 6 November 2010. Retrieved 13 March 2011. 
  3. ^ a b "Constituencies A-Z - Election 2017". BBC News. Retrieved 2017-06-10. 
  4. ^ Leigh Rayment's Historical List of MPs – Constituencies beginning with "H" (part 1)
  5. ^ Craig, F.W.S., ed. (1972). Boundaries of parliamentary constituencies 1985-1972. Chichester, Sussex: Political Reference Publications. ISBN 0-900178-09-4. 
  6. ^ Ordnance survey website
  7. ^ Google Maps street views
  8. ^ List of Labour MPs elected in 2015 by % majority UK Political.info. Retrieved 2017-01-29
  9. ^ "Statement of Persons Nominated and notice of poll". Birmingham City Council. Retrieved 11 May 2017. 
  10. ^ "Birmingham Hall Green results". BBC News. Retrieved 9 June 2017. 
  11. ^ "Election Data 2015". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 17 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  12. ^ "Election Data 2010". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 26 July 2013. Retrieved 17 October 2015. 
  13. ^ Birmingham City Council: General Election 2010 Archived 8 May 2010 at the Wayback Machine.
  14. ^ "Election Data 2005". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  15. ^ "Election Data 2001". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  16. ^ "Election Data 1997". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  17. ^ "Election Data 1992". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  18. ^ "UK General Election results April 1992". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 6 December 2010. 
  19. ^ "Election Data 1987". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  20. ^ "UK General Election results April 1992". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 11 June 1987. Retrieved 17 September 2010. 
  21. ^ "Election Data 1983". Electoral Calculus. Archived from the original on 15 October 2011. Retrieved 18 October 2015. 
  22. ^ "UK General Election results April 1983". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 9 April 1992. Retrieved 6 December 2010. 
  23. ^ "UK General Election results May 1979". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 28 May 1979. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  24. ^ "UK General Election results October 1974". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 10 October 1974. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  25. ^ "UK General Election results February 1974". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 28 February 1974. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  26. ^ "UK General Election results June 1970". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 18 June 1970. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  27. ^ "UK General Election results March 1966". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 31 March 1966. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  28. ^ [1]
  29. ^ "UK General Election results October 1964". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 15 October 1964. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  30. ^ [2]
  31. ^ "UK General Election results October 1959". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 8 October 1959. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  32. ^ [3]
  33. ^ "UK General Election results May 1955". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 26 May 1955. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  34. ^ [4]
  35. ^ "UK General Election results October 1951". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 25 October 1951. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  36. ^ [5]
  37. ^ "UK General Election results March 1966". Richard Kimber's Political Science Resources. Politics Resources. 31 March 1966. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 

External links[edit]