Roman Catholic Diocese of Adria-Rovigo

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Diocese of Adria-Rovigo
Dioecesis Adriensis-Rhodigiensis
Duomo (Adria).jpg
Adria Cathedral
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Venice
Statistics
Area 1,193 km2 (461 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2015)
204,525
197,975 (96.8%)
Parishes 109
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 7th Century
Cathedral Cattedrale di SS. Pietro e Paolo (Adria)
Co-cathedral Concattedrale di S. Stefano Papa e Martire (Rovigo)
Secular priests 120 (diocesan)
26 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Pierantonio Pavanello
Map
Roman Catholic Diocese of Adria-Rovigo in Italy.svg
Website
www.diocesi.rovigo.it
Co-cathedral in Rovigo

The Italian Catholic Diocese of Adria-Rovigo (Latin: Dioecesis Adriensis-Rhodigiensis), in the Triveneto, has existed under this name since 1986. It is a Latin suffragan to the Patriarchate of Venice.[1][2]

Its territory comprises roughly the northeastern Italian Province of Rovigo (Rovigo itself is not an episcopal see), and a part of one town in the Province of Padua.

In 2015, in the diocese of Adria-Rovigo there was one priest for every 1,355 Catholics.

Special churches[edit]

Its Cathedral episcopal see is the Cattedrale di SS. Pietro e Paolo dedicated to Saints Peter and Paul, in Adria, province of Rovigo.

It has a Co-Cathedral: Concattedrale di S. Stefano Papa e Martire Concattedrale dedicated to Martyr Pope Stephen I, in Rovigo, which never was a diocese.

Furthermores, there are several Minor Basilicas :

  • Basilica di S. Apollinare Basilica di S. Apollinare, in Rovigo
  • Basilica di S. Bellino Basilica in San Bellino, Rovigo
  • Basilica di S. Maria Assunta della Tomba in Adria
  • Basilica del Pilastrello in Lendinara, Rovigo

Ecclesiastical history[edit]

Tradition dates the preaching of the Gospel in Adria from the days of Saint Apollinaris, himself consecrated bishop by Saint Peter. The figure of this Bishop of Ravenna has a singular importance in the hagiographical legends of the northeast of Italy. Even if Emilia, Romagna and the territory around Venice were Christianized and had bishops (the two facts are concomitant) before Piedmont, for example, their conversion does not go back beyond the end of the second century.

The first known bishop of Adria is Gallonistus, who was present at a synod in Rome (649) under Pope Martin I (Mansi, XII). The Venerable Bede's Martyrology mentions a Saint Colianus, Bishop of Adria, but nothing is known about him.

Established in 640 AD as Diocese of Adria. Amongst the bishops of Adria is the Blessed Aldobrandinus of Este (1248-1352).

Gained territory on 1818.05.01 from the Metropolitan Archdiocese of Ravenna, and exchanged territory with the Metropolitan Archdiocese of Ferrara Exchanged territory again on 1819.03.09 with Diocese of Padova

The diocese had in the early 20th century, for a population of 190,400: 80 parishes, 300 churches, chapels and oratories; 250 secular priests, 72 seminarians, 12 regular priests and 9 lay-brothers; 90 confraternities; 3 boys schools (97 pupils) and 6 girls schools (99 pupils).

Renamed on 1986.09.30 as Diocese of Adria–Rovigo.

Bishops[edit]

(all Roman Rite)

(incomplete : first millennium mostly unavailable[weasel words])

Diocese of Adria[edit]

Erected: 7th Century
Latin Name: Adriensis
Metropolitan: Patriarchate of Venice

to 1500[edit]

  • Gallionistus (649)[3]
...
  • Leo (or Leopertus) (861)[4]
  • Theodinus (877)[5]
...
  • Paulus (920)[6]
  • Gemerius (attested in 953)
  • Astulf (ca. 972–992)[7]
...
  • Benedictus (ca. 1050–1063) laid the foundation stone for the Cathedral at Rovigo.
...
  • Rolandus Zabarelli (ca. 1210–1233)[8]
  • Guilelmus d'Este (1240–1257)
  • Jacobus (1270–ca. 1277)
  • Pellegrinus (1277–1280)
  • Otholinus, O.Camald. (1280–1284)[9]
  • Bonifatius (ca. 1285–1286)
  • Bonajuncta (Bonaggiunta) (1288–1306)
  • Joannes, O.Humil. (1308–1317)[10]
  • Aegidius (1317)
  • Salionus Buzzacarini (1318–1327)
  • Exuperantius Lambertuzzi (1327–1329)[11]
  • Benvenuto Borghesini, O.P. (1329–1348)[12]
  • Aldobrandino d'Este (19 Mar 1348 - 18 Jan 1353) (transferred to Bishop of Modena)
  • Giovanni da Siena (bishop), O.F.M. Conv. (1 Nov 1352 - )
...
...
...

1500 to 1700[edit]

1700 to 1900[edit]

  • Filippo della Torre (6 Feb 1702 - 25 Feb 1717 Died)[16]
  • Antonio Vaira (12 Jul 1717 - 8 Oct 1732 Died)[17]
  • Giovanni Soffietti, C.R.M. (19 Jan 1733 - 7 Sep 1747 Died)[18]
  • Pietro Maria Suárez (20 Nov 1747 - 19 Jun 1750 Died)[19]
  • Pellegrino Ferri (16 Nov 1750 - 30 Sep 1757 Died)[20]
  • Giovanni Francesco Mora, C.O. (2 Oct 1758 - 15 Jan 1766 Died)[21]
  • Arnaldo Speroni, O.S.B. (2 Jun 1766 - 2 Nov 1800 Died)[22]
  • Federico Maria Molin (24 Aug 1807 - 16 Apr 1819 Died)
  • Carlo Pio Ravasi, O.S.B. (8 Jan 1821 Confirmed - 2 Oct 1833 Died)
  • Antonio-Maria Calcagno (19 Dec 1834 Confirmed - 8 Jan 1841 Died)
  • Bernardo Antonino Squarcina, O.P. (27 Jan 1842 - 22 Dec 1851 Died)
  • Giacomo Bignotti (27 Sep 1852 - 7 Mar 1857 Died)
  • Camillo Benzon (27 Sep 1858 - 10 Dec 1866 Died)
  • Pietro Colli (27 Mar 1867 - 30 Oct 1868 Died)
  • Emmanuele Kaubeck (27 Oct 1871 - 31 Aug 1877 Died)
  • Giovanni Maria Berengo (31 Dec 1877 - 12 May 1879 Appointed, Bishop of Mantova)
  • Giuseppe Apollonio (12 May 1879 - 25 Sep 1882 Appointed, Bishop of Treviso)
  • Antonio Polin (25 Sep 1882 - 18 May 1908 Died)

since 1900[edit]

  • Tommaso Pio Boggiani, O.P.[23] (31 Oct 1908 - 9 Jan 1912) (Appointed Titular Archbishop of Edessa in Osrhoëne,[24] then Cardinal in 1916. He was Archbishop of Genoa, 1919-1921)
  • Anselmo Rizzi (4 Jun 1913 - 19 Oct 1934 Died)
  • Guido Maria Mazzocco (12 Nov 1936 - 8 Nov 1968 Died)
  • Giovanni Mocellini (1 Jan 1969 - 12 Mar 1977 Resigned)
  • Giovanni Maria Sartori (12 Mar 1977 - 7 Dec 1987 Appointed, Archbishop of Trento)
  • Martino Gomiero (7 May 1988 - 11 Oct 2000 Retired)

Diocese of Adria-Rovigo[edit]

Name Changed: 30 September 1986
Latin Name: Adriensis-Rhodigiensis
Metropolitan: Patriarchate of Venice

  • Andrea Bruno Mazzocato (11 Oct 2000 - 3 Dec 2003 Appointed, Bishop of Treviso)
  • Lucio Soravito de Franceschi (29 May 2004 - 23 Dec 2015 Retired)
  • Pierantonio Pavanello (23 Dec 2015 - )

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Diocese of Adria-Rovigo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  2. ^ "Diocese of Adria-Rovigo" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ Ughelli, II, p. 401. Girolamo Rossi (1589). Hieronymi Rubei Historiarum Rauennatum libri decem (in Latin) (altera ed.). Venica: ex typographia Guerraea. p. 205. 
  4. ^ Leo(pertus) was present at the first Roman council of 861. Ughelli, II, p. 401. J.D.Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio editio novissima Tomus XV (Venice: Antonio Zatta 1772), p. 605, and cf. p. 603.
  5. ^ Bishop Theodinus was present at the Synod of Ravenna in November 877, presided over by Pope John VIII. J.D.Mansi (ed.), Sacrorum Conciliorum nova et amplissima collectio editio novissima Tomus XVII (Venice: Antonio Zatta 1770), p. 342. Ughelli, II, p. 401. Gams, p. 768.
  6. ^ Bishop Paulus was the recipient of a letter from Pope John X in 920. Ughelli, II, p. 401. Philippus Jaffe, Regesta pontificum Romanorum editio altera Tomus I (Leipzig: Veit 1885), p. 450, no. 3561.
  7. ^ Ughelli, II, p. 401. Gams, p. 768.
  8. ^ Gams, p. 769.
  9. ^ Gams, p. 769. Eubel, I, p. 71.
  10. ^ Gams, p. 769.
  11. ^ Lambertuzzi was transferred from Commacio on 22 November 1327. He was transferred to Cervia on 29 October 1329. Eubel, I, p. 183 and p. 199.
  12. ^ Gams, p. 769. Eubel, I, p. 71 (prints 1319, a typographical error).
  13. ^ "Bishop Ludovico Sarego" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved November 24, 2016
  14. ^ "Bishop Germanicus Mantica" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved August 21, 2016
  15. ^ Labia had previously been Archbishop of Corcyra in the Venetian empire (1659–1677). Gauchat, IV, p. 164. Ritzler, V, p. 69, with note 2.
  16. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 69, with note 3.
  17. ^ Ritzler, V, p. 69, with note 4.
  18. ^ Ritzler, VI, p. 66, with note 3.
  19. ^ Ritzler, VI, p. 66, with note 4.
  20. ^ Ritzler, VI, p. 66, with note 5.
  21. ^ Ritzler, VI, p. 66, with note 6.
  22. ^ Ritzler, VI, p. 66, with note 7. Speroni was a native of Pavia. He was consecrated in Rome by Pope Clement XIII on 8 June 1766. He was the author of a book on the Bishops of Adria: Speroni, Arnaldo (1788). Adriensium episcoporum series historico-chronologica monumentis illustrata (in Latin). Pavia: Jo: Antonii Conzatti. 
  23. ^ Harris M. Lentz (23 March 2009). Popes and Cardinals of the 20th Century: A Biographical Dictionary. McFarland. p. 27. ISBN 978-1-4766-2155-5. 
  24. ^ Boggiani was made titular Archbishop of Edessa to qualify him to be Nuncio in Mexico (1912-1914).

Sources[edit]

See also[edit]

Acknowledgment[edit]

  •  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Adria". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton. 

link title

Coordinates: 45°03′00″N 12°03′00″E / 45.0500°N 12.0500°E / 45.0500; 12.0500