Roman Catholic Diocese of Amiens

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Bishop of Amiens)
Jump to navigation Jump to search
Diocese of Amiens

Dioecesis Ambianensis

Diocèse d'Amiens
Amiens cathedral 001.JPG
Location
CountryFrance
Ecclesiastical provinceReims
MetropolitanArchdiocese of Reims
Statistics
Area6,277 km2 (2,424 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2015)
571,154
498,000 (est.) (87.2%)
Parishes49
Information
DenominationRoman Catholic
Sui iuris churchLatin Church
RiteRoman Rite
Established3rd Century
CathedralCathedral Basilica of Notre Dame in Amiens
Patron saintSt. Fermin of Amiens
Secular priests67 (diocesan)
8 (Religious Orders)
16 Permanent Deacons
Current leadership
PopeFrancis
BishopOlivier Leborgne
Metropolitan ArchbishopThierry Jordan
Emeritus BishopsJacques Moïse Eugène Noyer
Map
Diocèse d'Amiens.svg
Website
Website of the Diocese

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Amiens (Latin: Dioecesis Ambianensis; French: Diocèse d'Amiens) is a diocese of the Latin Rite of the Roman Catholic Church in France. The diocese comprises the department of Somme, of which the city of Amiens is the capital.

History[edit]

The diocese of Amiens was a suffragan of the Archdiocese of Reims during the old regime; it was made subordinate to the diocese of Paris under the Concordat of 1801, from 1802 to 1822; and then in 1822 it became a suffragan of Reims again.

Louis Duchesne denies any value to the legend of two Saints Firmin, honoured on the first and twenty-fifth of September, as the first and third Bishops of Amiens. The legend is of the 8th century and incoherent.[1] Regardless of whether a St. Firmin, native of Pampeluna, was martyred during the Diocletianic Persecution, it is certain that the first bishop known to history is St. Eulogius, who defended the divinity of Christ in the councils held during the middle of the 4th century.

Cathedral and churches[edit]

The cathedral (13th century) is an admirable Gothic monument, and was made the subject of careful study by John Ruskin in his Bible of Amiens. The nave of this cathedral is considered a type of the ideal Gothic.

Cathedral Chapter[edit]

The Cathedral of Notre Dame d'Amiens was served by a Chapter composed of eight dignities and forty-six Canons. The dignities were: the Dean, the Provost, the Chancellor, the Archdeacon of Amiens, the Archdeacon of Ponthieu, the Cantor, the Master of the Schola, and the Penitentiary. The Dean was elected by the Chapter.[2]

Churches[edit]

The city of Amiens also had a Collegiate Church of Saint-Firmin, whose Chapter was composed of a Dean and six prebendaries. All were elected by the Chapter and installed by the bishop. Saint-Nicolas-au-Cloître d'Amiens also had a Chapter, composed of a Dean and eight prebendaries, all elected by the Chapter and installed by the bishop.

The church of St. Acheul, near Amiens, and formerly its cathedral, was, in the 19th century, the home of a major Jesuit novitiate.[3] The beautiful churches of St. Ricquier[4] and Corbie[5] perpetuate the memory of the great Benedictine abbeys and homes of learning founded in these places in 570 and 662.

In 859 the Normans invaded the valley of the Somme, and sacked the abbey of Saint-Riquier. They pillaged Amiens and held it for more than a year, until the city was ransomed by Charles the Bald.[6]

Bishops[edit]

There is a medieval list of the Bishops of Amiens, but it first appears in the work of Robert of Torigni in the second half of the 12th century, and its names before the 8th century are very uncertain.[7]

to 1000[edit]

[c. 300: Firminus,] first bishop, and martyr[8]
Amiens Cathedral, portal of Saint Fermin
[4th century: Firminus the Younger,] second bishop, and confessor
  • c. 346: Eulogius[9]
  • 5th century: Leodardus
  • circa 450: Audoenus
  • c. 511: Edibius[10]
  • c. 549: Beatus[11]
[c. 554: Honoratus][12]
[circa 600: Salvius][13]
  • c. 614: Berachundus[14]
  • c. 650: Bertofredus[15]
  • [circa 670: Thodefridus][16]
  • 7th century: Deodatus[17]
  • 7th century: Dado[18]
  • c. 692–c. 697: Ursinianus[19]
  • [c. 721: Dominicus][20]
  • before 728 – 746: Christianus[21]
  • c. 748–768: Raimbertus[22]
  • c. 777?: Vitultus[23]
  • c. 769–798/799: Georgius[24]
  • c. 799–831: Jesse[25]
  • circa 831: Ragenar
  • 849–872: Hilmerad[26]
  • c. 875: Geroldus[27]
  • c. 892–928: Otgarius[28]
  • c. 929–947: Deroldus[29]
[947: Thibault] (Intrusus)[30]
  • from c. 949: Ragembaldus[31]
[972–975: Thibaud] (again)[32]
  • c. 975–980: Almannus[33]
  • c. 980–992: Gotesmannus[34]
  • c. 993–c. 1030: Fulco [35]

1000 to 1300[edit]

1101–1104: Sede vacante[42]
  • 1104–1115: Godfrey of Amiens[43]
  • 1116–1127: Enguerrand de Boves[44]
  • 1127–1144: Guérin de Chastillon-Saint-Pol
  • 1144–1164: Theoderic (Dietrich)
  • circa 1164–1169: Robert I.
  • 1169–1204: Thibaud d'Heilly
  • circa 1204–1210: Richard de Gerberoy
  • circa 1211–1222: Evrard de Fouilloy
  • circa 1222–1236: Geoffroy d'Eu
  • 1236–1247: Arnold
  • 1247–1257: Gérard de Conchy
  • 1258–1259: Aleaume de Neuilly
  • 1259–1278: Bernard d'Abbeville
  • 1278–1308: Guillaume de Mâcon[45]

1300 to 1500[edit]

  • 1308–1321: Robert de Fouilloy[46]
  • 1321–1325: Simon de Goucans[47]
  • 1326–1373: Jean de Cherchemont[48]
  • 1373–1375: Jean de la Grange (Cardinal)[49]
  • 1376–1388: Jean Rolland[50]
  • 1389–1410: Jean de Boissy (Avignon Obedience)[51]
  • 1411–1413: Bernard de Chevenon[52]
  • 1413–1418: Philibert de Saulx[53]
  • 1418–1433: Jean d'Harcourt[54]
  • 1433–1436: Jean le Jeune[55]
  • 1436–1437: Francesco Condulmer (Administrator)[56]
  • 1437–1456: Jean Avantage[57]
  • 1457–1473: Ferry de Beauvoir[58]
  • 1473–1476: Jean de Gaucourt[59]
  • 1476–1478: Louis de Gaucourt[60]
  • 1482–1501: Pierre Versé[61]

1500 to 1800[edit]

  • 1501–1503: Philip of Cleves
  • 1503–1538: François de Hallvyn[62]
  • 1538–1540: Cardinal Charles Hémard de Denonville[63]
  • 1540–1546: Cardinal Claude de Longwy de Givry (Administrator)[64]
  • 1546–1552: François de Pisseleu[65]
  • 1552–1562: Nicolas de Pellevé[66]
  • 1564–1574: Antoine de Créqui[67]
  • 1574–1577: vacant
  • 1577–1617: Geoffroy de La Marthonie[68]
  • 1617–1652: François Lefèvre de Caumartin[69]
  • 1653–1687: François Faure[70]
  • [1687]–1706: Henri Feydeau de Brou[71]
  • 1707–1733: Pierre de Sabatier[72]
  • 1734–1774: Louis-François-Gabriel d'Orléans de La Motte[73]
  • 1774–1791: Louis-Charles de Machault[74]
  • 1791–1801: Eléonore-Marie Desbois (Constitutional Bishop of Somme)[75]

From 1800[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ Duchesne, Fastes III, pp. 122-124.
  2. ^ Pouillé, p. 1 (c. p. 323). In 1706 there were 9 dignities and 43 Canons: Ritzler-Sefrin, p. 81, note 1; VI, p. 79, note 1.
  3. ^ Eusèbe Godfroy (1854). Notice sur Notre-Dame de Saint-Acheul, ancienne cathédrale d'Amiens (in French). Amiens: Caron et Lambert. Joseph Roux (1890). Histoire de l'abbaye de Saint-Acheul-lez-Amiens: étude de son temporel au point de vue économique (in French). Amiens: Yvert et Tellier. pp. 196–239.
  4. ^ Christian Manable; Sabine Racinet (2009). Saint-Riquier: Une grande abbaye bénédictine. Paris: A&J Picard. ISBN 978-2-7084-0820-3.
  5. ^ Pierre Héliot (1957). L'Abbaye de Corbie: ses églises et ses batiments. Bibliothèque de la revue d'histoire ecclésiastique, 29. (in French). Louvain: Bureaux de la Revue Bibliothèque de l'Université. William W.Kibler, William W.Clark, L. Gaillard, and J.Daoust, eds. Corbie, abbaye royale (Lille: Facultés Catholiques, 1963).
  6. ^ Soyez, pp. 27-28.
  7. ^ Duchesne, p. 123.
  8. ^ Susie Nash; British Library (1999). Between France and Flanders: Manuscript Illumination in Amiens. University of Toronto Press. p. 61. ISBN 978-0-8020-4114-2. The episcopal list actually names two bishops Firminus, one after the other.
  9. ^ Bishop Eulogius was present at the Council of Cologne in 346. Duchesne, p. 127, no. 1. Carolus Munier, Concilia Galliae, A. 314 – A. 506 (Turnholt: Brepols 1963), p. 27.
  10. ^ Bishop Edibius was present at the Council of Orléans in 511. Duchesne, p. 127 no. 2. C. De Clercq, Concilia Galliae, A. 511 – A. 695 (Turnholt: Brepols 1963), p. 13.
  11. ^ Bishop Beatus was present at the Council of Orléans in 549. Duchesne, p. 127 no. 3. C. De Clercq, Concilia Galliae, A. 511 – A. 695 (Turnholt: Brepols 1963), p. 160.
  12. ^ Honoratus is known from a collection of miracle stories of the 11th century, and it dates him to the time of Pope Pelagius (555–560). The episcopal list puts him immediately after the second Firminus, and in Firminus' Legend he is associated with Pope Vigilius (537–555). Duchesne, p. 125.
  13. ^ Duchesne, p. 125: "Quant à S. Salvius, qui vient au quatrième rang sur la liste, le document biographique qui le concerne est un faux grossier." It is scarcely more than a reproduction of the chapter devoted to Saint Salvius of Albi by Gregory of Tours.
  14. ^ Bishop Berachundus participated in the Council of Paris in 614. Duchesne, p. 127 no. 4. C. De Clercq, Concilia Galliae, A. 511 – A. 695 (Turnholt: Brepols 1963), p. 282, line 202.
  15. ^ Bishop Bertofredus was present at the Council of Chalon-sur-Saone in 650. Duchesne, p. 127-128 no. 5. C. De Clercq, Concilia Galliae, A. 511 – A. 695 (Turnholt: Brepols 1963), p. 309, line 163.
  16. ^ Theodefrid was the first abbot of Corbie. There are two charters which mention the name of a bishop Theodefrid, one of Thierry III (whose authenticity has been questioned) and one of Bishop Aiglibert of Mans; but neither mentions the diocese of which he was bishop, and his name does not appear in Robert de Torigni's list of bishops of Amiens. Duchesne, p. 128 no. 6, with notes 2 and 3.
  17. ^ Deodatus is only a name in the episcopal list. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1156. Soyez, p. 20.
  18. ^ Dado is only a name in the episcopal list. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1156. Soyez, p. 21.
  19. ^ Ursinianus is named in two charters of King Clovis III, in 692 and 697. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1156. Mioland, I, p. xxv. Soyez, p. 81. Duchesne, p. 128, no. 7.
  20. ^ Dominicus is known only from a hagiographical account of the transfer of the remains of Saint Lambert at Liège in 721. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1156. Mioland, I, p. xxvi. Soyez, p. 22. Duchesne, p. 128, no. 8, note 5, states that the document on which the story rests has no historical value (n'a aucune valeur). Acta Sanctorum Septembris Tomus V (Antwerp 1755), p. 553.
  21. ^ Christianus had been Abbot of Moustier Saint-Jean c. 713. He was elected Bishop of Amiens at a date unknown. He consecrated a virgin c. 728. He died in 746. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1156-1157. Mioland, I, p. xxv. Soyez, pp. 21-22. Duchesne, p. 128, no. 9.
  22. ^ Bishop Rimbertus was the addressee of a letter of Pope Zacharias in 748. He died on 25 February 767 (i.e. 768). Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1157. Mioland, I, p. xxvi. Soyez, p. 22. Duchesne, p. 128, no. 10.
  23. ^ Three sources agree that nothing is known about Bishop Vitulfus except the date of his death, 777, which contradicts the information on Bishop Georgius. But none of the three provides a reference for the fact. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1157. Mioland, I, pp. xxv-xxvi. Soyez, p. 22. Duchesne, p. 128, no. 11, calls him Ailulfus, quoting (p. 122) the episcopal list, but without a date.
  24. ^ Georgius was bishop of Ostia, and had been in France with Pope Stephen II in 754. In February 756 he was dispatched by Pope Stephen II to France to beg help from the Franks against the Lombard King Aistulf, who was besieging Rome. Georgius was still in France in March 757. He was back in Rome at the beginning of the reign of Pope Paul I, who sent him as ambassador to Pipin again in the Spring of 758 (or 759); he was still at the royal court in June 761. At some point between 764 and 766 Pepin requested that Bishop George of Ostia stay in France at the royal court, and the Pope again granted his request (iam iterum concedit). On 28 June 767 the new Pope, Constantine II, was consecrated by Bishop George of Palestrina, a privilege usually reserved to the Bishop of Ostia. In 769 he was present at the Council of Rome, as the Bishop of Amiens. In 782 he was sent on a mission to Pope Hadrian by Charlemagne. He took part in the consecration of the churches at Saint-Riquier on 1 January 798. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1157. Philippus Jaffe, ed. (1867). Bibliotheca rerum germanicarum (in Latin). Tomus IV. Monumenta Carolina. Berlin: apud Weidmannos. pp. 47, 61, 77, 84–85, 94, 129. Louis Duchesne (1886). Le Liber Pontificalis. Tome I. Paris: E. Thorin. pp. 473, 482 column 1. Duchesne, Les fastes III, p. 127, no. 12.
  25. ^ Bishop Jesse is known to have consecrated an altar in the church of the monastery of Centule in September 799. He accompanied Pope Leo III in his return to Rome, and was present for the coronation of Charlemagne on Christmas Day, 800. In 831 at an Assembly held at Aix-la-Chapelle by Louis the Pious, Bishop Jesse was canonically deposed from his bishopric. An attempt to restore him on the part of Archbishop Ebbo of Reims failed. He died in Italy at the court of King Lothaire on 31 August 836. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1157-1158. Mioland, pp. xxvi-xxvii. Soyez, pp. 23-25. Duchesne, p. 129 no. 13.
  26. ^ Hilmeradus was elected Bishop of Amiens in June 849, at the command of King Charles the Bald. Lupus of Ferrieres wrote to Archbishop Hincmar of Reims that, although Hilmeradus was lacking somewhat in erudition, he would be agreeable to the policies of Hincmar. Hilmeradus attended the council of Paris in November 849, in 859 at that of Savonières,in 860 at Tufey (Toul), in 861 at Poissy, in 863 at Verberie, in 866 at Verberie, and again at Verberie in 869. In 871 he sent a proxy to the council of Douzy (Reims). He died in 872. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1159. Mioland, pp. xxviii-xxix. Soyez, pp. 26-28.
  27. ^ Geroldus was present at the Council of Chalons in 875, and the Assembly of Pontion in 876. It was in the episcopacy of Bishop Geroldus, in 875, that the income of the Cathedral-Monstery was separated into the income (mensa) of the bishop and the income of the Canons. In 881 the Normans destroyed Amiens. He died in 881 or 891. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1159-1160. Mioland, p. xxix. Soyez, p. 28.
  28. ^ Otgarius had been Dean and Canon of Saint-Quentin (Vermand). The Chronicle of Corbie makes him bishop of Amiens by 892. He was present at the consecration of Archbishop Hervé of Reims in 900. He sent a procurator to the Council of Reims in 923. Flodoard, the chronicler of Reims, places his death in 928. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1160. Mioland, pp. xxix-xxx. Soyez, pp. 28-29.
  29. ^ Deroldus had received medical training, and was part of the entourage of Louis, son of Charles the Simple, who became Louis IV of France in 936. He became Bishop of Amiens in 929, and was present at the Council of Soissons in 941. He was present at an Assembly at Laon on 10 April 947. He died in 947. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1160-1161. Mioland, p. xxx. Soyez, pp. 30-31.
  30. ^ In 947, following the death of Bishop Deroldus, the electors at Amiens chose Ragembaldus, Abbot of Saint-Valery, as their bishop. Hugh, Count of Paris, however, who was at war with Louis IV, wanted a loyal supporter in the bishopric of Amiens, and had his nephew, Archbishop Hugh of Reims, consecrate a deacon of the Church of Soissons named Thibault as bishop of Amiens. Archbishop Hugh himself had been deposed from the archbishopric of Reims. He was deposed by the Papal Legate at the Council of Trier in 947, and with the aid of the Count of Flanders, a supporter of Louis IV, the Amienois drove Thibault out of Amiens in 949. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1161. Mioland, pp. xxx-xxxi. Soyez, pp. 31-32.
  31. ^ Ragembaldus had been chosen bishop in 947, but had been excluded from Amiens, but had been excluded by the actions of Hugh of Paris, his nephew Archbishop Hugh, and his follower Count Roger of Amiens. After Thibault was deposed and expelled, Ragembaldus was consecrated by Archbishop Artoldus. The date of the end of his episcopacy is unknown. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1161. Mioland, pp. xxx-xxxi. Soyez, pp. 31-32.
  32. ^ After the death of Bishop Ragembaldus, Thibault attempted to resume his usurpation of the See of Amiens. He was present with Archbishop Adalberonus at a provincial synod in May 972. He and Archbishop Hugh, who had consecrated him, refused to appear for trial at Rome, he was condemned and excommunicated by the Papal Legate Stephen and Archbishop Adalberonus on 24 September 975. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1161. Mioland, p. xxxi. Soyez, pp. 31-32.
  33. ^ Alamannus, or Alvianus, or Almarus, is known only as a name in the episcopal lists. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1161. Mioland, p. xxxi. Soyez, p. 32.
  34. ^ Gotesmannus was a nephew of King Lothair, the son of King Louis IV; he was also a relative of Bishop Bruno of Langres and Archbishop Arnoul of Reims. He subscribed an accord between the monks of Corbie and the count of Amiens in 985, and another charter of Corbie in 987. He took part in a council which was held at Saint-Basle (near Reims) at the instigation of Hugh Capet, on 17 June 991, for the purpose of deposing Archbishop Arnoul. He died in 991, on VII Idus Ianuarii (7 January 992). Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1161-1162. Mioland, p. xxxi. Soyez, p. 33.
  35. ^ Foulques de Valois (House of Valois was the son of Gaultier II, Comte d'Amiens, and Adelle de Crépy. He took part in the Council of Reims in 993 and the Council of Reims in 1015. He subscribed a charter of King Robert I in favor of the Church of Noyon in 1017. At Pentecost 1027 he took part in the coronation of King Henry I of France. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1162. Mioland, I, p. xxxii. Gams, p. 487 column 2.
  36. ^ Fulco (Foulques), son of Dreux II (Drogo) of Amiens and the Vexin and Godiove, sister of King Edward of England, was the nephew of his predecessor, Bishop Fulco. He took part in a ceremony at Corbie in 1036. In 1057 Bishop Fulco and Count Gualterius were granted privileges by King Henry I (1031–1060), and in 1058 Fulco subscribed a charter of the same king. Around Easter he was sent by King Henry as ambassador to Duke William of Normandy. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1162-1163. Mioland, I, pp. xxxii-xxxiii. Gams, p. 487 column 2.
  37. ^ Gui (Wido) was the son of Ingelrannus (Enguerrand) I of Ponthieu. He studied under Ingelrannus, abbot of Centule. He was Archdeacon of Amiens in 1049, when Bishop Fulco sent him to Rome to lodge complaints against the Abbot of Corbie. He became Bishop of Amiens in 1058, and on 12 July 1058 he presided at the transfer of the relics of Radbertus Paschesius. According to the Chronicle of Corbie, he died on 22 December 1074. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1164-1166. Mioland, I, p. xxxiii. Gams, p. 487 column 2.
  38. ^ In 1076, Fulco subscribed a charter as Bishop-elect of Amiens, but he was never consecrated. He is not included in the episcopal list preserved by Robert de Torigni. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1166. Mioland, I, p. xxxiii. Gams, p. 487 column 2.
  39. ^ Radulfus had been elected and received investiture under pressure from laymen. He was consecrated bishop by the Bishop of Soissons and the Bishop of Laon, without the knowledge of Manasses, the Archbishop of Reims and Metropolitan of the Province, who was in Rome at the time. Manasses had been suspended at the Council of Autun in 1077 by the Papal Legate Hugues de Die. On his return and discovery of what had happened, he wrote to Pope Gregory VII, who referred the matter back to Hugues. Hugues held a council at Poitou in January 1079, and ordered Raoul and his two consecrators to make the journey to Rome to be judged by the Pope. Nothing more is heard of Raoul, and it is presumed that he was deposed. He died in 1081. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana]] X, p. 1166. Mioland, I, p. xxxiv. Gams, p. 487 column 2.
  40. ^ Bishop Rorico had been Canon of Amiens before his election as bishop. He was present at the Council of Meaux in 1080, and the Council of Meaux in 1081. He was driven out of Amiens by his flock for criminal behavior, and returned by force. He was present at another Council of Meaux in 1082, the Council of Soissons in 1084, and the Council of Compiègne in 1085. He died in 1090 or 1091. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1166. Mioland, I, p. xxxiv. Gams, p. 487 column 2.
  41. ^ Gerwinus was born at Laon, and became a monk at Saint-Remy (Reims). When his uncle Gerwinus, who was Abbot of Saint-Riquier (Amiens) resigned, Gerwinus was chosen to replace him. He traveled to Rome, where his election as Bishop of Amiens was confirmed by Pope Urban II in a letter of 21 December 1091. He was denounced to Pope Urban II as a simoniac at the Council of Reims in 1293, and documents from the Council were carried to Italy by Hariulf, the author of the Chronicle of Riquier. In a letter of July 18 1093, Pope Urban advised the clergy and people of Amiens that Gerwin had been found innocent of the charges against him. He attended the Councils of Soissons and that of Reims (1094), and was present at Urban II's Council of Chalons in 1095. The monks of Saint-Riquier managed to convince the Pope of all the charges against Gerwinus, and Pope Urban required him to resign the position of Abbot of Riquier. He died in January or February of 1101. Hariulf d'Oudenbourg (1894). Chronique de l'abbaye de Saint-Riquier: Ve siècle-1104 (in French and Latin). Paris: A. Picard et fils. pp. vi, 279, note 1. Mioland, I, pp. xxxiv-xxxv.
  42. ^ Mioland, I, p. xxxv.
  43. ^ Geoffroy attended the Council of Troyes as Abbot of Noyon. His election as Bishop of Amiens was proclaimed by the bishops in council, presided over by Cardinal Richard of Albano, the Papal Legate, and he was consecrated at Reims by Archbishop Manasses of Reims. He was conducted to Amiens by his two co-consecrators, Bishops Lambert of Arras and Jean of Therouanne. He visited Rome in 1106 and 1109. In 1112 he presided at the Council of Vienne, in place of the indisposed Papal Legate. At the end of 1114 he attempted to retire to the monastery of Cluny, and then the Grand Chartreuse, but he was compelled to return to Amiens by the Papal Legate. He attended the Council of Chalons in 1115. He died on 8 November 1115. Mioland, I, p. xxxv-xxxvii. Soyez, pp. 43-51.
  44. ^ Enguerrand de Boves had been Canon and Archdeacon of the Cathedral Chapter. He died on 21 May 1227. Mioland, I, p. xxxvii-xxxviii. Soyez, pp. 51-52.
  45. ^ Guillaume de Mâcon was a relative of Comte Jean de Mâcon. He was a doctor of Canon Law. He had been a cleric of King Louis IX, followed Louis on his Crusade, and was with him when he died at Tunis on 25 August 1270. He was an Aumonier of King Philip III, and was a friend of Pope Gregory X (1271–1276). He had been a Canon of Paris and a Canon of Beauvais; he was Dean of the Cathedral Chapter of Laon. He was elected Bishop of Amiens by the Cathedral Chapter of Amiens in 1278. He swore his episcopal oath to the Archbishop of Reims on the Sunday after the Feast of Saints Peter and Paul (29 June). He was consecrated by the Archbishop of Reims, Pierre Barbet. His epitaph claims that he was Bishop of Amiens for thirty years. He died on 19 May 1308. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1187-1190. Mioland, I, pp. xlv-xlvii. Gams, p. 487, column 2. Eubel, I, p. 85.
  46. ^ Robert de Fouilloy's cousin, Jean d'Aubigny, was Bishop of Troyes (1326–1341). Robert, who had been a Canon of Noyon, was elected in 1308. He was a frequent ambassador of French kings. He died on 20 March (or 18, or 24 March) 1321. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1190-1191. Mioland, I, p. xlvii. Eubel, I, p. 85.
  47. ^ Simon de Goucans, a native of Besançon, had been Abbot of the Benedictine monastery of Balma (Baume-les-Messieurs) in the diocese of Besançon. He was appointed by Pope John XXII on 18 May 1321. He died on 3 December 1325. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1191-1192. Hauréau, Gallia christiana XV, p. 179. Mioland, I, pp. xlvii-xlviii. Eubel, I, p. 85.
  48. ^ Cherchemont's uncle was Dean of Poitou and then Chancellor of France; his father was a Doctor of Laws. He was named Bishop of Amiens by Pope John XXII on 18 February 1326. He made his formal entrance into Amiens on 16 August 1327. He died on 26 January 1373. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1192-1193. Mioland, I, p. xlviii. Eubel, I, p. 85.
  49. ^ Jean de la Grange was appointed Bishop of Amiens on 7 February 1373 by Pope Gregory XI, and he took possession by proxy on 12 April. He was named a cardinal on 20 December 1375, and on 28 December notice of his promotion was sent to the Chapter of the Cathedral of Amiens. He died in Avignon on 24 April 1402. Mioland, I, pp. lviii-l. Eubel, I, pp. 22 no. 18; 85.
  50. ^ Jean de Rolland was appointed on 3 January 1376 by Pope Gregory XI. Eubel, I, p. 85.
  51. ^ Jean de Boissy was the nephew of Cardinal Jean de la Grange, and the brother of Imbert de Boissy, President of the Parlement of Paris and Councilor of the King. He had been Canon of the Cathedral Chapter of Amiens, Chancellor of Chartres (1380), and then Bishop of Mâcon (1380–1389). He was appointed Bishop of Amiens on 29 March 1389 by Pope Clement VII. He died on 4 September 1410. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1196-1198. Lucien Merlet; Rene Merlet (1900). Dignitaires de L'église Notre-Dame de Chartres (in French). Chartres: C. Métais. p. 111. Eubel, I, pp. 85, 330.
  52. ^ Bernard de Chevenon, who was a royal Councilor, was transferred to Amiens from the diocese of Saintes (1398–1411) by Pope John XXIII on 20 March 1411. He was transferred from Amiens to the diocese of Beauvais on 14 August 1413. Mioland, I, li-lii. Soyez, pp. 110-113. Eubel, I, pp. 85, 132, 537.
  53. ^ Philibert de Saulx was the brother of Jean de Saulx, Chancellor of Burgundy. He had been Canon of Autun, Dean of the Collegiate Church of Saint-Amé in Douai, Archdeacon of Beaune, and Bishop of Châlons-sur-Saône (1408–1413). He was transferred to Amiens by Pope John XXIII on 14 August 1413. He died in 1418. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1199. Mioland, I, lii. Soyez, pp. 113-115. Eubel, I, pp. 85, 153.
  54. ^ Jean d'Harcourt was Archdeacon of Vexin (1409), Canon and Chancellor of Rouen (1413), and Canon of Amiens. He was elected bishop of Amiens by the Chapter, but Pope Martin V had also named Philippe de Montjeu. King Charles VI. He was approved as Bishop of Amiens on 10 May 1424 by Pope Martin V. He was transferred to the diocese of Tournay on 22 April 1433, and in 1436 to Narbonne. Mioland, I, p. lii. Eubel, I, p. 85; II, p. 253.
  55. ^ Jean Le Jeune, the son of Robert Le Jeune, was born at Amiens. He was a domestic of Canon Jean le Petit, who sent him to study at Paris, on his return to Amiens, ca. 1410, he practiced law and became the Bailli of Bishop Jean d'Harcourt. He was a partisan of the English, who made him Bailli of Amiens. He became Dean of the Cathedral Chapter of Nantes, and then Bishop of Mâcon (1431–1433). He undertook his obligations to the Apostolic Camera on 26 April 1433. In 1436 he was transferred by Pope Eugene IV to the diocese of Therouanne, and he was ambassador of the Duke of Burgundy to the Council of Florence in 1439. He died in 1463 at the age of eighty-two. Mioland, I, p. 53. Soyez, pp. 122-124. Eubel, I, p, 331; II, pp. 86,
  56. ^ Cardinal Condulmer was a Venetian, and the nephew of Pope Eugene IV. He was granted the See of Amiens in commendam on 5 November 1436, and had the grant revoked less than five months later, on 27 March 1437, when he was named Archbishop of Besançon. He never took possession of the diocese of Amiens. Mioland, I, p. liv. Soyez, p. 125. Eubel, II, p. 86.
  57. ^ Jean Avantage was born at Étaples (diocese of Therouanne), and was a Doctor of Medicine (Montpellier). He was Canon of Cambrai and of Amiens, and then Provost of the Cathedral Chapter of Tournai and Provost of the Collegiate Church of Saint-Pierre at Lille. When Amiens came under the control of Philip the Good, Duke of Burgundy (treaty of Arras), the Duke chose to make his physician, Jean Avantage, bishop of the city. Pope Eugene IV agreed in a decree of 27 March 1437. He took possession of the diocese by proxy on 27 September 1437. Bishop Jean died on 26 November 1456. Mioland, I, p. liv. Soyez, p. 125-126. Eubel, II, p. 86.
  58. ^ Beauvoir: Eubel, II, p. 86.
  59. ^ Gaucourt: Soyez, pp. 139-140. Eubel, II, p. 86.
  60. ^ Louis de Gaucourt was the brother of Jean de Gaucourt: Mioland, p. lvi. Soyez, pp. 141-142. Eubel, II, p. 86.
  61. ^ Pierre Versé, a Canon of Bayeux, was the nephew of Pierre Coctier, the physician of King Louis XI. He was named bishop on 7 September 1472, received his bulls on 7 October 1482, and took his oaths to the King on 24 November. He made his solemn entry into his diocese on 8 May 1483. On 30 May he took part in the coronation of Charles VIII. He died on the last day of February 1500 (i.e. 1501), or on 10 February 1501. Mioland, I, pp. lvi-lvii. Soyez, pp. 142-147. Eubel, II, p. 86.
  62. ^ Halluin was the son of Louis de Halluin, Governor and Lieutenant-General of Picardy. He had been a Canon of the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris, and Abbé du Gard. He was appointed Bishop of Amiens at the age of twenty, by a bull of Pope Alexander VI on 5 August 1503. He was at the Council of Pisa in 1511. He died on 18 June 1538, at the Abbaye du Gard, after a morning of hunting. Mioland, I, pp. lvii-lviii. Soyez, pp. 148-160. Eubel, III, p. 106.
  63. ^ Denonville had been Bishop of Mâcon since 1531. He had been French Ambassador at the Papal court when he was named Bishop (as his epitaph says, not Administrator) of the diocese of Amiens, and took possession by proxy on 27 July 1538, while being allowed to retain the diocese of Mâcon. He made his solemn entry on 9 December 1538; he had a suffragan bishop at Amiens, Nicolas Lagrené. Cardinal Hémard died at Amiens (not at Le Mans) on 23 August 1540. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1205-1206. Mioland, I, p. lviii. Soyez, pp. 162-164. Eubel, III, p. 106.
  64. ^ Cardinal de Givry was already simultaneously Bishop of Langres, Périgueux and Poitiers. He was named administrator of Amiens (in commendam) by Pope Paul III at the Consistory of 24 September 1540, and took possession by procurator on 13 October 1540. The Cardinal never visited the diocese. He resigned in February 1546. He died on 9 August 1561. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1206. Mioland, I, p. lix. Soyez, pp. 164-167. Eubel, III, pp. 22 no. 31; 106.
  65. ^ Pisselieu's sister was Anne Duchesse d'Étampes, through whose influence over her lover, Francis I of France, he obtained the bishopric of Amiens, on 12 February 1546. He took possession by proxy on 24 May 1546. In 1552, after the accession of Henri II and his mistress Diane de Poitiers, he exchanged the diocese of Amiens for the Abbey of Saint-Corneille de Compiègne. He died on 14 February 1564. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, p. 1206. Mioland, I, p. lix. Soyez, pp. 167-168. Eubel, III, p. 106.
  66. ^ Pellevé was appointed by Pope Julius III on the nomination of King Henri II on 24 August 1552. He was subsequently transferred to the [[Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Sens{|diocese of Sens]] on 16 December 1562, and then to Reims on 10 May 1591. He was named a cardinal by Pope Pius V on 17 May 1570. He died on 24 March 1594. Eubel, III, pp. 44 no. 17, 106, 285, 298.
  67. ^ Antoine de Créqui was transferred from the diocese of Nantes on 14 July 1564 by Pope Pius IV. He died on 20 June 1574. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1207-1208. Mioland, I, p. lx-lxi. Soyez, pp. 176-187. Eubel, III, p. 106.
  68. ^ Geoffroy was approved (preconised) on 26 October 1576 by Pope Gregory XIII. Due to old age, a coadjutor bishop, his nephew, was appointed by Pope Paul V on 4 December 1617. Bishop Geoffrey died on 17 December 1617. Sainte-Marthe, Gallia christiana X, pp. 1208-1209. Mioland, I, p. lxi-lxii. Soyez, pp. 187-203. Eubel, III, p. 106. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 80 note 2.
  69. ^ Lefèvre was the nephew of Bishop Geoffroy de La Marthonie, and was appointed his Coadjutor on 4 December 1617, with the title of Titular Bishop of Hierapolis. He succeeded to the diocese on 17 December 1617. He died on 27 November 1652. Soyez, pp. 204-220. Gauchat, IV, p. 80 with note 2.
  70. ^ Faure was a preacher at the court of Louis XIV, who converted to Catholicism the Duke de Montausier and James II of England. He had been Bishop of Glandève from 1651 to 1653. He died on 11 May 1687. Jean, p. 309. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 81, note 2.
  71. ^ Feydeau was a native of Paris and held a master of theology degree from the University of Paris. He was nominated bishop of Amiens by King Louis XIV on 18 May 1687. For the next five years he served as Vicar Capitular. He was preconised (approved) on 24 March 1692 by Pope Innocent XII, after having had to wait five years for his bulls due to the diplomatic rupture between Louis XIV and the Vatican, over the Four Gallican Articles of 1682. He died on 14 June 1706. Jean, p. 309. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 81, note 3.
  72. ^ Sabatier was born at Valréas in the Comtat Venaissin, and held a doctorate in theology from the University of Paris. He served as Vicar General of Limoges before being nominated Bishop of Amiens by King Louis XIV on 15 August 1706. He was preconised on 7 April 1707 by Pope Clement XI, and consecrated at Saint-Sulpice in Paris on 15 May 1707 by the Archbishop of Reims, Charles-Maurice Le Tellier. He died at Amiens on 20 January 1733. Jean, p. 310. Ritzler-Sefrin, V, p. 81, note 4.
  73. ^ De La Motte: Martial Levé (1962). Louis-Frano̧is-Gabriel d'Orléans de la Motte: Evêque d'Amiens, 1683-1774 (in French). Paillart. Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 79 with note 2.
  74. ^ Machault: Ritzler-Sefrin, VI, p. 79 with note 3.
  75. ^ Pisani, pp. 193-197.
  76. ^ Villaret nominated Bishop of Amiens by First Consul N. Bonaparte on 9 April 1802, and his appointment was agreed to by the Papal Legate on 15 May. He was consecrated on 23 May 1802 by the Archbishop of Aix, Champion de Cicé. He was appointed Bishop of Alessandria (della Paglia)) on 17 Dec 1804, and then Bishop of Casale Monferrato in Piedmont. When Napoleon lost control of Piedmont, Villaret resigned, and returned to Paris, where he died on 9 May 1824. 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., p. 40. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, p. 66, 70, 137.
  77. ^ Mandolx had previously been Bishop of La Rochelle (1802–1806). He was transferred to Amiens by the Emperor Bonaparte on 17 December 1804, but he was only granted the rights of Administrator by Pope Pius VII on 1 February 1805, and was not preconised (approved) as Bishop until 4 February 1806. In 1814 he restored the Jesuits to the Collège d'Amiens. He died on 14 August 1817. 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., p. 41. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, p. 70, 327.
  78. ^ Bombelles had been ambassador to Vienna under Louis XVI; he was married, and had five children. His wife having died in 1802, he became a priest and served in two parishes in Silesia, before being named Dean of Ober-Glogau. In 1816 he was named Aumonier to the Duchess of Berry, and in 1817 was nominated Bishop of Amiens by King Louis XVIII. Due to the failure of the National Assembly to ratify the Concordat of 1817, he was not preconised until 23 August 1819. He was consecrated a bishop in Paris on 3 October 1819 by the Archbishop of Reims, Jean de Coucy. He died in Paris on 5 March 1822, at the age of 77. 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., p. 42. Ritzler-Sefrin, VII, p. 70.
  79. ^ Chabons retired in 1837 due to age and decrepitude: 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., pp. 43-44.
  80. ^ Mioland had been the Superior of the Société des missionaires lyonnais. He was nominated Bishop of Amiens on 22 November 1837, and preconised on 12 February 1838. He was consecrated in Lyon on 22 April 1838 by the Titular Archbishop of Amaseia, Jean-Paul-Gaston de Pins, the Administrator of the diocese of Lyon, and he took possession of the diocese of Amiens on 27 May. He was appointed Coadjutor Archbishop of Toulouse (-Narbonne)) on 12 April 1849, with the title of Titular Archbishop of Sardis. Amédée Desgeorge (1873). Vie de Mgr Mioland: archevêque de Toulouse, évêque d'Amiens et premier supérieur des missionnaires de Lyon (in French). Lyon: P.N. Josserand. 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., p. 44.
  81. ^ Salinis had been Vicar General of Bordeaux and teacher of Scripture at the local seminary. He was nominated Bishop of Amiens on 23 February, he was preconised on 2 April 1849, and consecrated on 29 July 1849 by François Donnet, Archbishop of Bordeaux. He was transferred to the diocese of Auch on 12 February 1856. 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., pp. 44-45. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, pp. 94, 134.
  82. ^ Boudinet was born at Saint-Rogatien, near La Rochelle. He was a teacher in the Major Seminary in Pons, and in 1835 became Director of the Minor Seminary. In 1837 he became Superior of the Collège de Pons. He was named Apostolic Administrator of the diocese of Pamiers on 11 March 1856, with the title of Bishop of Cybistra (Turkey). On 7 April 1856 Napoleon III nominated him Bishop of Amiens, and he was preconised by Pope Pius IX on 16 June. He was consecrated a bishop in Reims on 20 July 1856 by Cardinal Thomas Gousset. He died on 1 April 1873. 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., pp. 45-46. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, pp. 94, 236.
  83. ^ Bataille: Alphonse Houllier (1879). Biographie de Mgr Bataille: évêque d'Amiens (in French). Amiens: Delattre-Lenoël. 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., p. 47.
  84. ^ Guilbert was nominated Archbishop of Bordeaux by the French Government on 5 June 1883, and transferred by Pope Leo X on 9 July 1883. 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., pp. 47-48.
  85. ^ Bishop Lamazou, who had been Bishop of Limoges (preconised 13 May 1881), died before he could take possession of the diocese of Amiens. Notice biographique sur Mgr Pierre-Henri Lamazou, évêque de Limoges, ancien curé de Notre-Dame d'Auteuil (in French). Paris: Jules Gervais. 1884. Ritzler-Sefrin, VIII, p. 337.
  86. ^ Jacquenet was transferred from the diocese of Gap by nomination of the French Government on 10 November 1883. He was transferred by Pope Leo XIII on 27 March 1884, and was installed in his cathedral at Amiens on 28 May 1884. 'V.', in: Société bibliographique (France) (1907). L'épiscopat français..., p. 48.
  87. ^ Renou born at Bourgueil (Tours) in 1844. He served in the Franco-Prussian War and was decorated a Chevalier of the Legion of Honor. The French Republic nominated him Bishop of Amiens on 26 November 1892, and he was preconised (approved) by Pope Leo XIII on 19 January 1893. He was consecrated on 6 April 1893 at Tours by Archbishop Meignan, and was enthroned at Amiens on 26 April. He was appointed Archbishop of Tours on 30 May 1896, and retired on 2 August 1913, at which time he was named titular Archbishop of Apamea.
  88. ^ Dizien was born at Cure (Yonne) in 1846, and educated at the Major Seminary at Sens. He was private secretary of Archbishop Victor Bernadou of Sens at the First Vatican Council. He was ordained a priest in 1870. He became Vicar of the Cathedral, and then Vicar General of the Bishop. He was named Bishop of Amiens by decree of 30 May 1896, and was preconised in Consistory by Pope Pius X on 25 June 1896. He was consecrated on 8 September at Sens by Archbishop Bernadou. He died on 27 March 1915. Nos évêques en 1907: Photographies et biographies (in French). Lille: La Croix du Nord. 1907. p. 68. Institut catholique de Paris (1914). Bulletin. 2nd (in French). Quatrième année. Paris: Secretariat de l'Institut catholique. pp. 97–99.
  89. ^ Eglise catholique de la Somme, L’Évêque – Monseigneur Olivier Leborgne; retrieved: 2017-12-27. (in French)

Sources[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]

External links[edit]

Acknowledgment[edit]

Coordinates: 49°53′39″N 2°18′07″E / 49.8942°N 2.30189°E / 49.8942; 2.30189