Ancient Diocese of Cavaillon

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The former French diocese of Cavaillon (Lat. dioecesis Caballicensis) existed until the French Revolution as a diocese of the Comtat Venaissin, a fief of the Church of Rome. It was a member of the ecclesiastical province headed by the Metropolitan Archbishop of Avignon.[1] Its seat was at Cavaillon, in the south-eastern part of what is now France, in the modern department of Vaucluse.

The Cathedral was officially dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary (Nôtre Dame), but popularly honored Saint Veranus, the sixth-century bishop of Cavaillon. In 1202 the Cathedral had a Chapter composed of a Provost, a Precentor, and a Sacristan, to which were added the Archdeacon and 12 Canons.[2]

After the Concordat of 1801, the territory of the diocese passed to the diocese of Avignon.[3]

Bishops[edit]

To 1400[edit]

  • Genialis[4]
  • [439–451: Julien][5]
  • [c. 459: Porcien][6]
  • 517–529: Philagrius
  • c. 549: Praetextatus (Pretextat)
  • c. 585: Saint Veran[7]
  • c. 788: Lupus (Fr. Loup)
  • [c. 875: Hildebold][8]
  • 906–916: Renard
  • c. 951: Heribert
  • c. 972: Didier I.
  • 976–979: Walcaud
  • c. 982: Dietrich
  • 991–1014: Enguerrand
  • c. 1031: Peter I.
  • c. 1055: Clement
  • 1070–1075: Raoul
  • 1082–1095: Didier II.
  • c. 1103: Johannes I.
  • c. 1140 – c. 1155: Alfant
  • 1156–1178: Benedict
  • 1179–1183: Pons I.
  • 1184–1202: Bermond
  • 1203 – c. 1225: Bertrand de Durfort
  • c. 1230 – c. 1250: Gottfried I.
  • 1251–1261: Rostaing Belinger[9]
  • 1267–1277: Giraud
  • 1278 – c. 1280: André I.
  • 1282 – c. 1310: Bertrand Imbert
  • 1311–1317: Pons II Auger de Laneis
  • 1322 – c. 1327: Gottfried II.
  • c. 1330: Berenger I.
  • c. 1332: Raimond
  • 3 August 1334 – 1366: Philippe de Cabassole
  • 23 September 1366 – 11 October 1388: François de Cardaillac, O.Min. (transferred to Cahors)
  • 15 October 1388 – 1392: Hugo (Hugues) de Magialla
  • 16 December 1392 – c. 1405: Andreas (André) (Administrator)[10]

From 1400[edit]

  • c. 1405: Pierre II.
  • c. 1408: Guillaume I.
  • c. 1409–1421: Nicolas de Johannaccio
  • 1421–1424: Guillaume II.
  • 1426 – c. 1430: Bernard Carbonet de Riez
  • c. 1432: Ferrier Galbert
  • c. 1433: Jean II. de La Roche
  • c. 1437: Barthélémi
  • 1439 – 28 January 1447: Pierre Porcher
  • 22 February 1447 – c. 1466/7: Palamède de Carretto[11]
  • 9 February 1467 – c. 1484?: Toussaint de Villanova, O.Carm.[12]
  • ? c. 1496: Jean Passert
  • 15 July 1496 – 22 April 1501: Louis Passert of Padua[13]
  • 28 April 1501 – 1507: Bernardino or Beranger Gamberia de Benasque
  • 22 November 1507 – 13 August 1524: Cardinal Giovanni Battista Pallavicini[14]
  • 9 September 1524 – 24 June 1537: Mario Maffei of Volterra[15]
  • 6 July 1537 – 16 July 1540: Cardinal Girolamo Ghinucci (Administrator) [16]
  • 1541 – c. 1568: Pietro (Pierre) Ghinucci[17]
  • 1569–1584: Cristoforo (Christophe) Scotti (of Piacenza)[18]
  • 1584–1585: Domenico (Dominique) Grimaldi (promoted Archbishop of Avignon)
  • 1585–1591: Pompeo Rocchi of Lucca (Pompée Rochi de Lucques)[19]
  • 27 February 1592–1596: Giovanni Francesco Bordini, Orat.[20] (promoted to Avignon)
  • 1597–1608: Girolamo Cancelli (Jerome Centelles)[21]
  • 1610–1616: Cesare Ottavio Mancini (Octave Mancini)[22]
  • 1616–1646: Fabrice de La Bourdaisière
  • 23 September 1646 – 1657: Louis de Fortia[23] (transferred to Carpentras)
  • 1657 – 23 July 1659: François Hallier[24]
  • 1660 – 27 June 1663: Richard de Sade[25]
  • 4 September 1665 – 21 December 1707: Jean-Baptiste de Sade de Mazan
  • 9 September 1709–30 July 1742: Joseph de Guyon de Crochans (promoted Archbishop of Avignon)[26]
  • 30 July 1742–28 March 1757: François-Marie Manzi (promoted Archbishop of Avignon)[27]
  • 28 March 1757 – 5 September 1760: Pierre-Joseph Artaud[28]
  • 16 February 1761 – 1790: Louis-Joseph Crispin des Achards de La Baume (fled to Italy)

Titular See[edit]

In January 2009 the bishopric was revived by Pope Benedict XVI as a titular see,[29] to provide the ever-increasing number of auxiliary bishops and Vatican bureaucrats with prelatial episcopal status. Theoretically, the titular bishop of Cavaillon belongs to the ecclesiastical province of Marseille. The current incumbent since 2009 is Krzysztof Zadarko, Auxiliary Bishop of Koszalin-Kołobrzeg (Poland).

References[edit]

  1. ^ David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: Diocese of Cavaillon (suppressed). Retrieved: 2016-07-22.
  2. ^ Gallia christiana I, p. 939-940.
  3. ^ Cavaillon (Diocese) [Catholic-Hierarchy]
  4. ^ A bishop with this name appeared at the Council of Nîmes in 396: Duchesne, p. 270, no. 1.
  5. ^ He was really Bishop of Apt: Duchesne, p. 270 note 5, who does not admit him among the Bishops of Cavaillon.
  6. ^ Duchesne, p. 270 note 5, does not admit him among the Bishops of Cavaillon.
  7. ^ J.-F. André (1858). Histoire de Saint Véran anachorète à Vaucluse, évêque de Cavaillon (in French). Paris: A. Pringuet. 
  8. ^ Rejected by Duchesne, p. 271, note 2.
  9. ^ [Étienne Antoine] Granget (1862). Histoire du diocèse d'Avignon et des anciens diocèses dont il est formé (in French). Tome I. Avignon: Sequin ainé. pp. 412–415. 
  10. ^ Eubel, I, p. 179.
  11. ^ On the death of Bishop Porcher, the Chapter of Cavaillon elected Bertrand Romey of Cavaillon, but the Pope voided the election and appointed Palamedes de Carreto: Étienne Antoine Granget (1862). Histoire de diocèse d'Avignon et des anciens diocèses dont il est formé (in French). Tome premier. Avignon: Seguin. p. 601.  Eubel, II, p. 123.
  12. ^ Eubel, II, p. 123.
  13. ^ Eubel, II, p. 123.
  14. ^ Salvador Miranda, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church: Biographical Dictionary: Pallavicino, Giovanni Battista. Retrieved: 2016-07-22.
  15. ^ Luigi Pescetti, “Mario Maffei,” Rassegna volterrana 6, 2, 10 (1932): 65–90. Eubel, III, p. 161. Peter G. Bietenholz; Thomas Brian Deutscher (2003). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation, Volumes 1-3, A-Z. University of Toronto Press. pp. 365–366. ISBN 978-0-8020-8577-1.  Maffei was an absentee bishop, living in Rome, where he was Secretary of the College of Cardinals: Aldo D. Scaglione (1991). Knights at Court: Courtliness, Chivalry, & Courtesy from Ottonian Germany to the Italian Renaissance. University of California Press. p. 227. ISBN 978-0-520-07270-1. 
  16. ^ Eubel, III, p. 161. Peter G. Bietenholz; Thomas Brian Deutscher (2003). Contemporaries of Erasmus: A Biographical Register of the Renaissance and Reformation, Volumes 1-3, A-Z. Toronto CA: University of Toronto Press. pp. 93–94. ISBN 978-0-8020-8577-1.  Salvador Miranda, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church: Biographical Dictionary: Ghinucci, Girolamo. Retrieved: 2016-07-22.
  17. ^ Brother of Cardinal Girolamo Ghinucci.
  18. ^ Eubel, III, p. 161.
  19. ^ He was the author of a treatise, "Il gentilhuomo", Pompeo Rocchi (1568). Il gentilhuomo (in Italian). Lucca: Busdraghi. 
  20. ^ Bordini was a friend, and sometimes, secretary of Filippo Neri, the founder of the Oratory: Alfonso Capecelatro (1882). The Life of Saint Philip Neri: Apostle of Rome. Volume II. London: Burns & Oates. pp. 349–352.  He wrote a Life of Pope Sixtus V (1588) and a Life of St. Teresa of Avila (1601).
  21. ^ He was chamberlain of Clement VIII, who appointed him Bishop of Cavaillon.
  22. ^ He was Secretary of the Congregation of Bishops and Regulars in Rome: G. Moroni, ed. (1855). Dizionario di erudizione storico-ecclesiastica da s. Pietro sino ai nostri giorni specialmente intorno ai principali santi ... compilazione di Gaetano Moroni: Tiv-Tol. 76 (in Italian). Volume LXXVI (76). Venice: Tipografia Emiliana. p. 83.  C. Weber (1994). Legati e governatori dello Stato pontificio: 1550-1809 (in Italian). Rome: Ministero per i Beni Culturali e Ambientali. Ufficio Centrale per i Beni Archivistici. p. 188. ISBN 978-88-7125-070-0. 
  23. ^ Born in Avignon. Casimir François Henri Barjavel (1841). Dictionnaire historique, biographique et bibliographique du département de Vaucluse (in French). L. Devillario. p. 502.  Terris, Jules de (1886). Les évêques de Carpentras: étude historique (in French). Avignon: Seguin. pp. 273–279. 
  24. ^ Louis, Ceyssens (1969). "François Hallier". Bulletin de l'Institut historique Belge de Rome. 40: 157–264. 
  25. ^ He had been Chamberlain of Urban VIII, Canon of San Lorenzo in Damaso, Vice-Governor of Tivoli, and Vice-Governor of Ravenna. He was consecrated in Rome in Santa Maria Maggiore by Cardinal Francesco Barberini. He returned to Rome in 1663, where he died on 25 June. Jean Antoine Pithon-Curt (1750). Histoire de la noblesse du Comté-Venaissin, d'Avignon, et de la principauté d'Orange, dressée sur les preuves (in French). Tome III. Paris: De Lormel & Fils. p. 183. 
  26. ^ Ritzler, Hierarchia catholica V, p. 152. Henri Reynard-Lespinasse (1874). Armorial historique du diocèse et de l'état d'Avignon (in French). Avignon: Société française de numismatique et d'archéologie. pp. 94–95. 
  27. ^ Ritzler, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 157. Reynard-Lespinasse, p. 96.
  28. ^ Ritzler, Hierarchia catholica VI, p. 157.
  29. ^ David M. Cheney, Catholic-Hierarchy: Cavaillon (titular See). Retrieved: 2016-07-22.

Bibliography[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]