Roman Catholic Diocese of Como

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Diocese of Como
Dioecesis Comensis
Como (Italy)-cathedral.jpg
Aerial view of the cathedral in Como
Location
Country  Italy
Ecclesiastical province Milan
Statistics
Area 4,244 km2 (1,639 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2013)
533,000
(ca.) 518,000 (97.2%)
Parishes 338
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 4th Century
Cathedral Basilica Cattedrale di S. Maria Assunta
Secular priests 376 (diocesan)
141 (Religious Orders)
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Bishop Oscar Cantoni
Emeritus Bishops Diego Coletti (since 2016)
Map
Roman Catholic Diocese of Como in Italy.svg
Website
www.diocesidicomo.it

The Catholic Diocese of Como (Latin: Dioecesis Comensis) in northern Italy, has existed since the fourth century. It is a suffragan of the archdiocese of Milan. The bishops' seat is in Como Cathedral.[1][2]

Local legend credits the conversion of Como to the apostolate of Hermagoras of Aquileia (died c. 70).[3] Until 1528 Como was, indeed, a suffragan of the patriarchate of Aquileia (later of Venice) and followed the Aquileian Rite. In 1528 Como was placed under the jurisdiction of the Archbishop of Milan.

History[edit]

In the tenth century the Bishops of Como were also its temporal lords. Como Cathedral was begun in 1396, and was completed only in 1595; later the cupola and some small chapels were added (1730–44).

Bishops of Como[edit]

to 1000[edit]

  • Felix of Como[4] (379–391)
  • Provinus (Probinus, Prouinus)[5] (391–420)
  • Amantius of Como (420–450)
  • St. Abundius (450–489), sent as legate to the Council of Chalcedon by Pope Leo I
  • Console (489–495)
  • Esuperanzio (495–512)
  • Eusebius (512–525)
  • St. Eutychius (Eutichio) (525–539)[6]
  • Eupilio (approx. 539)
  • Flaviano I
  • Prospero
  • Giovanni degli Orchi (John Orco} (approx. 607)
  • Agrippino[7] (607–617)
  • Rubiano
  • Adalbert
  • Martiniano
  • Vittorino (approx. 628), opponent of Arianism as propagated by the Lombards
  • John II
  • John III
  • Ottaviano
  • Benedict I
  • Flaviano II (approx. 712)
  • Adeodato (712–730)
  • Gausoaldo (approx. 730)
  • Angilbert I (approx. 750)
  • Lupo (approx. 750)
  • Teodolfo
  • Adelongo (approx. 776)
  • Peter I (776–818)
  • Leo I (823–838)
  • Perideo (840–843)
  • Amalrico (844–865)
  • Angilbert II (866–880)
  • Liutardo (888–905)
  • Valperto I (911–914)
  • Valperto II (915)
  • Peter II (921)
  • Azzone (922–945)
  • Waldo (946–966)
  • Adelgisio (973–977)
  • Peter III (983–1005)

1000 to 1300[edit]

  • Eberhardus (1004–1006)
  • Albericus (1007–1027), founder of the Abbey of Sant'Abbondio
  • Liudger (1030/32–1046)
  • Benno (1049–1061)
  • Rainaldo (1061/62–1084), expelled by Emperor Henry IV for his loyalty to Pope Gregory VII
  • Eribert (1085–1088)
  • Hartwicus (1092), probably antibishop
  • Guido Grimoldi (1098–1125)
    • [Landulfus de Carcano[8] (1098–1118), Imperial supporter, intruder.]
  • Ardizzone I (1125–1159)
  • Enrico della Torre (1162–1167)
  • Anselmo della Torre (1168–1193)
  • Ardizzone II (1195–1197)
  • Guglielmo della Torre (1197–1226),[9] builder of many churches and founder of a hospital
  • Uberto di Sala (1228–1256)
  • Leone degli Avvocati (1259–1261)
  • Raimondo della Torre (1262–1274)
  • Giovanni degli Avvocati (1274–1293)
  • Leone Lambertenghi (1294–1325)

1300 to 1600[edit]

  • Benedetto di Asinago or Asinaga (1328–1339), who fled from the persecution of the Rusca, Lords of Como
  • Beltramino Paravicini (1339–1340)
  • Bonifacio da Modena (1340–1352)
  • Bernard (1352–1356)
  • Andrea degli Avvocati (1356–1361)
  • Stefano Gatti (1362–1369)
  • Enrico da Sessa (1369–1380)
  • Beltramo da Brossano (1380–1395)
  • Lucchino da Brossano or Borsano (1396–1408), who began to build the new cathedral
  • Antonio Turcone (1409–1420)
  • Francesco Bossi (1420–1434)
  • Giovanni Barbavara[10] (1436–1437)
  • Gerardo Landriani[11] (1437–1445)
  • Bernardo Landriani (1446–1451)
  • Antonio Pusterla (1451–1457)
  • Martino Pusterla (1457–1460)
  • Lazzaro Scarampi (1460–1466)
  • Brande Castiglioni (1466–1487)
  • Antonio Trivulzio (1487–1508)
  • Scaramuccia Trivulzio (1508–1527)
  • Cesare Trivulzio (1527–1548)
  • Bernardino della Croce (1548–1559)
  • Gianantonio Volpi (1559–1588), the learned reformer
  • Feliciano Ninguarda (1588–1595)
  • Filippo Archinti (bishop) (1595–1621)[12]

1600 to 1800[edit]

  • Aurelio Archinti (1621–1622)[12]
  • Desiderio Scaglia, O.P.[13] (1622–1625) (created Cardinal in 1621)
  • Lazzaro Carafino (1626–1665)[12]
  • Ambrogio Torriano[14] (1666–1679)
  • Carlo Ciceri[15] (1680–1694)
  • Stefano Giuseppe Menatti (1694–1695)
  • Francesco Bonesana (1696–1709)
  • Giuseppe Olgiati (1710–1735)
  • Alberico Simonetta (1736–1739)[16]
  • Paolo Cernuschi[17] (1739–1746)
  • Agostino M. Neuroni (1746–1760)
  • Giovanni Battista Anastasius count Peregrini (1760–1764)
  • Giambattista Mugiasca (1765–1789)
  • Giuseppe Bertieri, O.E.S.A. (1790–1792)[18] (transferred to Pavia)
  • Carlo Rovelli, O.P. (1793–1819) (transferred to Pavia)

since 1800[edit]

  • Giambattista Castelnuovo (1821–1831)
  • Carlo Romanò (1831–1855)
  • Giuseppe Marzorati (1858–1865)
  • Pietro Carsana (1872–1887)
  • Luigi Nicora (1887–1890)
  • Andrea Carlo Ferrari[19] (1891–1894), later archbishop of Milan and Cardinal
  • Teodoro Valfrè di Bonzo (1895–1905), later archbishop of Vercelli
  • Alfonso Archi (1905–1925)
  • Adolfo Luigi Pagani (1926–1930)
  • Alessandro Macchi (1930–1947)
  • Felice Bonomini (1947–1974)
  • Teresio Ferraroni (1974–1989)
  • Alessandro Maggiolini (1989–2006)
  • Diego Coletti (2006– today)

Parishes[edit]

The 338 parishes of the diocese are spread across four provinces of the Lombardy region: the Province of Como, the Province of Lecco, the Province of Sondrio, and the Province of Varese.[20] There is one priest for every 1,001 Catholics.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Diocese of Como" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  2. ^ "Diocese of Como" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved February 29, 2016
  3. ^ The story is not creditable; see: Ughelli, V, pp. 256-257. Cantù, I, pp. 33-34.
  4. ^ Felix, a Roman, was a student of Ambrose of Milan, and was consecrated by him as the first Bishop of Como on 1 November 379. He attended a synod held by Ambrose in Milan in 390 to deal with the heretic Jovianus. He held the episcopal seat for twelve years. Ughelli, p. 258. Cantù, I, pp. 36-38.
  5. ^ Jean Bolland; Godefroy Henschen; Daniel van Papenbroeck (1668). Acta Sanctorum Martii (in Latin). Tomus primus. Antwerp: apud Iacobum Meursium. pp. 759–760.  Ughelli, p. 258. Cantù, I, p. 38. Provinus is said to have been a native of Provence, and to have been appointed by Bishop Felix as his successor.
  6. ^ Eutychius died on 5 June 539, according to Gams, p. 786. http://catholicsaints.info/saint-eutichius-of-como/
  7. ^ Agrippino of Cologne, Germany (Colonia Agrippina !). Cantù, I, p. 92.
  8. ^ Lodovico Antonio Muratori (1744). Annali d'Italia dal principio dell'era volgare sino all'anno 1500 (in Italian). Tomo sesto. Milan: Pasquali. p. 394.  Gerhard Schwartz (1993). Die Besetzung der Bistümer Reichsitaliens unter den sächsischen und salischen Kaisern: mit den Listen der Bischöfe, 951-1122 (in German). Spoleto: Centro italiano di studi sull'alto Medioevo. p. 50.  Gams, p. 787.
  9. ^ Della Torre became bishop in 1204, according to Ughelli, p. 297, Cappelletti, XI, p. 347, Gams, p. 787, and Eubel, I, p. 217. He died on 21 October 1226.
  10. ^ Barbavara was a cleric of the diocese of Novara. He held the degree of Doctor in utroque iure ('Doctor of Canon and Civil Law'). He was transferred to the diocese of Tortona (suffragan of Milan) on 6 March 1437. Eubel, II, p. 140, with note 1.
  11. ^ Elisabetta Canobbio (2001). La visita pastorale di Gerardo Landriani alla diocesi di Como: 1444-1445 (in Italian). Milano: UNICOPLI. 
  12. ^ a b c Gauchat, Patritius (Patrice). HIERARCHIA CATHOLICA MEDII ET RECENTIORIS AEVI Vol IV. pp. 157–158. 
  13. ^ Fiorenza Rangoni (2008). Fra' Desiderio Scaglia cardinale di Cremona: un collezionista inquisitore nella Roma del Seicento (in Italian). Cernobbio (Como): Nuova Ed. Delta-Stilgrafix. ISBN 978-88-902019-3-6.  Cantù, II, p. 297. Scaglia was consecrated a bishop on May 16, 1621 in S. Giovanni Laterano by Cardinal Giovanni Battista Leni.
  14. ^ Torriano was a native of Indovero (Valsassino) in the diocese of Milan. He was a Doctor in utroque iure ('Doctor of Canon and Civil Law'), and a Master of Theology. He was Referendary of the Two Signatures (Judge). He died in October 1679. Gauchat, Hierarchia catholica IV, p. 158, with note 6.
  15. ^ Born in Como, Ciceri had been Bishop of Alessandria on his appointment to Como, on 13 May 1680. He was created a cardinal on 2 September 1686 by Pope Innocent XI and received the title of Sant'Agostino. He died at Como on 24 June 1694 at the age of 78. Ritzler, V, p. 13 and p. 166, with note 3.
  16. ^ Simonetta was Doctor in utroque iure ('Doctor of Canon and Civil Law') (Sapienza, 1731). He was Referendary of the Two Signatures (Judge) and Chamberlain of Honor to the Pope. He was then Vice-Legate in Bologna, then (1734) Governor of Camerino. He was appointed Bishop of Como by Pope Benedict XIII on 26 September 1735, and consecrated in Rome by Cardinal Giovanni Antonio Guadagni on 9 October 1735. He died in Milan on 11 March 1739. Ritzler, VI, p. 175, with note 2.
  17. ^ Born in Milan, Cernuschi had been Dean of the Cathedral of Milan, Chancellor of the Archdiocese, and Judge of Pious Causes, before being appointed Bishop of Como. He was Doctor in utroque iure ('Doctor of Canon and Civil Law') (Pavia, 1719). He was consecrated in Rome on 25 July 1739 by Cardinal Giuseppe Spinelli. Ritzler, VI, p. 176, with note 3. Cantù, II, pp. 208.
  18. ^ Bertieri was born in the village of Ceva (near Alba). He was Doctor of Theology (University of Vienna, 1768), and then professor. He was nominated Bishop of Como by the Emperor Joseph II on 18 June 1789, and confirmed by Pope Pius VI on 14 December 1789; he was consecrated in Vienna on 3 January 1790 by the Nuncio in Vienna, Archbishop Giovanni Battista Caprara. Ritzler, VI, p. 176, with note 7.
  19. ^ Ferrari held a Doctorate in Theology from the seminary of Parma (1883). He was bishop of Guastalla (1890-1891) before being named Bishop of Como. He was named a Cardinal by Pope Leo XIII in 1894, and granted the title of Sant'Anastasia. Salvador Miranda, The Cardinals of the Holy Roman Church Andrea Carlo Ferrari
  20. ^ Source for parishes: CCI (2008), Parrocchie, Chiesa Cattolica Italiana, retrieved 2008-03-15 .

Books[edit]

Reference works[edit]

Studies[edit]

External links[edit]

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainHerbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "article name needed". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton.