Bishop of Lausanne

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Model of Lausanne Cathedral.

The Bishop of Lausanne (French: Évêque de Lausanne) was a Prince-Bishop of the Holy Roman Empire (since 1011) and the Ordinary of the diocese of Lausanne, Switzerland (Latin: Dioecesis Lausannensis).

Bern secularized the bishopric in 1536. The bishop fled into exile, first in Evian, and then in Burgundy. Today, the Catholic diocese of Fribourg, Lausanne, and Geneva has its seat in Fribourg.

For the ecclesiastical history, see Lausanne and Geneva bishopric(s)

List of bishops[edit]

Bishop of Avenches[edit]

Bishop of Lausanne 574-1536[edit]

[1]

Bishop of Lausanne 1600-1814[edit]

Bishop of Lausanne and Geneva 1821-1924[edit]

Bishop of Lausanne, Geneva and Fribourg from 1924[edit]

Notes and references[edit]

  1. ^ Francis Aerny (1991), L'Evêché de Lausanne : (VIe siècle - 1536), Cabédita, French Book
  2. ^ Justin Favrod La Chronique de Marius d'Avenches, Cahiers Lausannois d'Histoire Médiévale, vol. 4, Lausanne, 1991
  3. ^ "Giuliano della Rovere". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  4. ^ "Jean de Watteville". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  5. ^ "Jost Knab". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  6. ^ "Henri Fuchs". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  7. ^ "Jean-Baptiste de Strambino". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  8. ^ "Pierre de Montenbach". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  9. ^ "Jacques Duding". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  10. ^ "Claude-Antoine Duding". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  11. ^ "Joseph-Hubert de Boccard". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  12. ^ "Joseph-Nicolas de Montenach". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  13. ^ "Berndard-Emmanuel de Lenzbourg". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  14. ^ "Jean-Baptiste d'Odet". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  15. ^ "Joseph-Antoine Guisolan". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  16. ^ "Pierre-Tobie Yenni". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007. 
  17. ^ "Etienne Marilley". Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved May 21, 2007.