Bishop of Llandaff

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Bishop of Llandaff
Bishopric
anglican
Coat of arms of the Diocese of Llandaff.svg
Barry Morgan.jpg
Incumbent:
Barry Morgan
Province Wales
Diocese Llandaff
Cathedral Llandaff Cathedral

The Bishop of Llandaff is the ordinary of the Church in Wales Diocese of Llandaff.

Area of authority[edit]

The diocese covers most of the County of Glamorgan. The Bishop's seat is located in the Cathedral Church of Saint Peter and Saint Paul (the site of a church wrongly said to have been founded in 560 by Saint Teilo), in the village of Llandaff, just north-west of the City of Cardiff. The Bishop's residence is Llys Esgob, The Cathedral Green, Llandaff in Cardiff.

Brief history[edit]

Pritchard Hughes was honoured by having a Dahlia Dahlia 'Bishop of Llandaff' named for him in 1924

The controversial Iolo Manuscripts claim an older foundation dating to Saints Dyfan and Fagan, said elsewhere to have missionized the court of King Lucius of Britain on behalf of Pope Eleutherius around AD 166. The manuscripts—others of which are original and others now known forgeries—list Dyfan as the first bishop and, following his martyrdom, Fagan as his successor.[1] Baring-Gould refers to them as chorepiscopi.[2] The present-day St Fagans (referenced in the manuscripts as "Llanffagan Fawr") is now a village near Cardiff.[2]

Originally Celtic Christians, the bishops were in full communion with the Roman Catholic Church from 777 until the Reformation. There is only evidence for the bishops being called Bishop of Llandaff from the early 11th century. Before this, though still ministering to Glamorgan and Gwent, the bishops described themselves as Bishop of Teilo[3] and were almost certainly based at Llandeilo Abbey. The very early bishops were probably based in Ergyng. Before 1107, the title Bishop of Gwlad Morgan (Glamorgan) had been adopted.[3] It was not until the title Bishop of Llandaff was used by Bishop Urban from c. 1119.[3] In medieval records, the bishop was sometimes referred to as the Archbishop of Llandaff.[citation needed] This appears to have been a simple reaction to the claim of St David's to the archiepiscopal title.[citation needed]

In 1534, the church in England and Wales broke allegiance with the Roman Catholic Church and established the Church of England. After a brief restoration with the Holy See during the reign of Queen Mary I, the Welsh dioceses remained part of the Anglican Province of Canterbury from the reign of Queen Elizabeth I until the early 20th century. Following the passing of the Welsh Church Act 1914, the church in Wales and Monmouthshire was disestablished and the independent Church in Wales was created on 31 March 1920. The bishopric and diocese of Llandaff now constitute part of the Church in Wales within the wider Anglican Communion.

In 1924, the Dahlia 'Bishop of Llandaff' was named after the Right Reverend Joshua Pritchard Hughes, who was bishop from 1905 to 1931.

The current Bishop of Llandaff is the Most Reverend Dr Barry Morgan; when elected as Bishop in 1999 his official signature was Barry Landav, but once elected Archbishop of Wales in 2003 his archiepiscopal signature Barry Cambrensis took precedence. He is supported by the Assistant Bishop of Llandaff, the Right Reverend David Wilbourne.

List of bishops[edit]

(Dates in italics indicate de facto continuation of office.)

Pre-Reformation[edit]

Pre-Reformation Bishops of Llandaff
From Until Incumbent Notes
Diocese of 'Glamorgan and Gwent' – Traditional list
522 c. 550 Dubricius Bishop of Ergyng
c. 550 c. 610 Saint Teilo Bishop of Teilo
c. 650 c. 700 Oudoceus
 ???  ??? Ubylwinus 7th-century bishop, probably of Ergyng
 ???  ??? Aedanus 7th century bishop, probably of Ergyng
 ???  ??? Elgistil 7th century bishop, probably of Ergyng
 ???  ??? Iunapeius 7th century bishop, probably of Ergyng
 ???  ??? Comergius 7th century bishop, probably of Ergyng
 ???  ??? Arwistil 7th century bishop, probably of Ergyng
 ???  ??? Gurvan 8th century bishop, probably of Gwent.
 ???  ??? Guodloiu 9th century bishop, probably of Gwent.
 ???  ??? Edilbinus 9th century bishop, probably of Gwent.
 ???  ??? Grecielis 9th century bishop, probably of Gwent.
c. 700  ??? Berthwyn Bishop of Teilo; succeeded Oudoceus according to the Llandaff Charters
 ???  ??? Tyrchanus
 ???  ??? Elvogus Probably a mistake: Elfoddw, Bishop of Bangor
 ???  ??? Catguaret
 ???  ??? Cerenhir
 ??? 874 Nobis Bishop of Teilo; probably the same as the Bishop of St David's
874  ??? Nudd
 ??? 927 Cimeliauc
927 929 Libiau
 ???  ??? Wulfrith
 ???  ??? Pater
 ??? 982 Gugan
982 993 Marcluith
993 1022 Bledri
1022 c. 1045 Joseph Died in Rome circa 1045.
c. 1045 c. 1056/59 See vacant
c. 1056/59 1104 Herewald Consecrated on 26 May 1056 or 23 May 1059. Suspended by Anselm of Canterbury soon after December 1093. Uncertain if reinstated, but died on 6 March 1104.
1104 1107 See vacant
Diocese of Llandaff
1107 1134 Urban Formerly Archdeacon of Llandaff. Consecrated on 11 August 1107. Died in office on or before 9 October 1134.
1134 1140 See vacant
1140 1148 Uhtred Also known as Uchtryd. Formerly Archdeacon of Llandaff. Consecrated in late January 1140. Died in office, probably in early 1148.
1148 1183 Nicholas ap Gwrgant Formerly a monk of Gloucester Abbey. Consecrated on 14 March 1148. Participated in the coronation of Henry the Young King on 14 June 1170. Suspended by Richard of Dover, archbishop of Canterbury in 1174 for blessing Robert, abbot of Malmesbury against the wishes of Josceline de Bohon, bishop of Salisbury. Died in office on 3 June or 4 July 1183.
1186 1191 William de Saltmarsh Formerly Prior of St Augustine's, Bristol. Elected on 3 December 1184 and consecrated on 10 August 1186. Died in office.
1191 1193 See vacant
1193 1218 Henry de Abergavenny Formerly Prior of Abergavenny. Consecrated on 12 December 1193. Created the cathedral chapter of Llandaff c. 1213. Died in office on 8 or 12 November 1218.
1219 1229 William de Goldcliff Formerly Prior of Goldcliff. Elected before 11 July 1219, received royal assent and the temporalities on 16 July 1219, and consecrated on 27 October 1219. Died in office on 28 January 1229.
1230 1240 Elias de Radnor Formerly Treasurer of Hereford. Received royal assent and the temporalities on 30 August 1230, and consecrated on 1 December 1230. Died in office on 7 or 13 May 1240.
1240 1240 Maurice (bishop-elect) Archdeacon of Llandaff (1217–1242). Elected by the cathedral chapter, probably 1240, but royal assent was refused. Died on 14 December 1242.
1240 1244 William de Christchurch (bishop-elect) Elected on 13 May 1240, but royal assent was refused. Apparenty he was not consecrated and resigned before June 1244.
1245 1253 William de Burgh Formerly a Canon of Llandaff, keeper of the king's Privy Seal, and controller of the Wardrobe. Elected sometime between 10–17 July 1244, received royal assent and the temporalities on 17 July 1244, and consecrated on 19 February 1245. Lost his sight c. 1246. Died in office on 11 June 1253.
1254 1256 John de la Ware Formerly Abbot of Margam. Elected sometime between 13 June–24 July 1253, received royal assent on 26 July 1253 and the temporalities on 12 August 1253, consecrated on 11 January 1254, and enthroned on 15 February 1254. Died in office on 29 or 30 June 1256.
1257 1266 William de Radnor Formerly Treasurer of Llandaff. Elected 28 July 1256, received royal assent on 26 July 1253 and the temporalities on 14 September 1256, and consecrated on 7 January 1257. Died in office on 9 January 1266.
1266 1287 William de Braose Formerly Canon of Llandaff. Elected c. 7 March 1266, received royal assent on 28 March 1266 and the temporalities on 14 April 1266, and consecrated on 23 May 1266. Died in office on 18 or 19 March 1287.
1287 1290 Philip de Staunton (bishop-elect) Precentor of Wells and a Canon of Llandaff. Elected by some canons of Llandaff before 10 July 1287, but was opposed other canons and the chancellor of Llandaff. His opponents appealed to the pope, and the election was quashed on 16 September 1290.
1290 1296 William Houghton (bishop-elect) Also known as William de Hotham. Dominican friar. Papal provision on 4 September 1290 and occurs as bishop-elect on 16 September 1290, but was unwilling to accept bishopric. Papal mandate ordering his obedience on 26 April 1291. Subsequently, became Archbishop of Dublin in 1296.
1297 1323 John de Monmouth Formerly Chancellor of Oxford University and a canon of Lincoln. Papal provision on 2 October 1294, appointed by Archbishop Robert Winchelsey of Canterbury on 14 October 1294, received possession of the temporalities on 4 April 1295, and consecrated on 10 February 1297. Died in office on 8 April 1323.
1323 1323 Alexander de Monmouth (bishop-elect) Elected on 25 June 1323, royal assent sought on 7 July 1323 and granted on 15 July 1323, but set set aside on hearing of the papal provision of Egglescliffe.
1323 1347 John de Egglescliffe Translated from Connor, Ireland. Papal provision on 20 June 1323 and received possession of the temporalities on 13 August 1324. Died in office on 2 January 1347.
1347 1347 John of Coventy (bishop-elect) Elected by the cathedral chapter of Llandaff, received royal assent to the election on 16 March 1347, but set set aside on hearing of the papal provision of Paschal.
1347 1361 John Paschal Consecrated on 16 February 1344 in the lifetime of Bishop Egglescliffe. Papal provision on 19 February 1347 and received possession of the temporalities between 2–7 July 1347. Died in office on 11 October 1361.
1361 1382 Rodger Cradock Translated from Waterford & Lismore on 15 December 1361. Died in office before 22 June 1382.
1383 1385 Thomas Rushhook Confessor to Richard II. Papal provision on 14 or 15 January 1383, received possession of the temporalities on 2 April 1383, and consecrated on 3 May 1383. Translated to Chichester on 16 October 1385.
1385 1389 William Bottlesham Translated from the Titular see of Bethlehem. Papal provision on 16 October/2 December 1385 and received possession of the temporalities on 21 August 1386. Translated to Rochester on 27 August 1389.
1390 1393 Edmund Bromfeld Papal provision on 9 August 1389, received possession of the temporalities on 17 December 1389, and consecrated on 20 January 1390. Died in office on 11 June 1393.
1394 1395 Robert Tideman of Winchcombe Formerly Abbot of Beaulieu (1392–93). Papal provision on 13 October 1393, received royal assent on 18 August 1393 and the temporalities sometime between 3 July and 24 October 1394. Translated to Worcester before 13 June 1395.
1395 1396 Andrew Barret Papal provision on 14 June 1395, received possession of the temporalities on 25 August 1395, and consecrated in 1395. Died in office before 12 April 1396.
1396 1398 John Burghill Confessor to Richard II. Papal provision on 12 April 1396 and consecrated after 10 July 1396. Translated to Coventy & Lichfield on 2 July 1398.
1398 1407 Thomas Peverel Translated from Ossory, Ireland on 12 July 1398 and received possession of the temporalities on 16 November 1398. Translated to Worcester on 4 July 1407.
1408 1423 John de la Zouche Elected before 13 or 30 November 1407, received possession of the temporalities on 7 June 1408, and consecrated on 12 August 1408. Died in office in April 1423.
1423 1425 John Fulford (bishop-elect) Elected by the cathedral chapter, sought royal assent on 6 May 1423, but the election set aside on hearing of the papal provision of Wells.
1425 1440 John Wells Papal provision on 9 July 1425 and consecrated in 1425. Died in office before 17 November 1440.
1440 1440 Reginald Boulers (bishop-designate) Abbot of Gloucester (1437–50). Nominated by King Henry VI on 21 November 1440, but Boulers refused the bishopric. Later he became Bishop of Hereford (1450–53) and then Bishop of Coventry & Lichfield (1453–59).
1441 1458 Nicholas Ashby Formerly Prior of Westminster. Nominated on 25 December 1440, papal provision on 17 February 1441, and consecrated on 21 May 1441. Died in office before 19 June 1458.
1458 1476 John Hunden Formerly Prior of King's Langley. Papal provision on 19 June 1458 and received possession of the temporalities on 25 August 1458. Resigned before 18 March 1476. Afterwards Archdeacon of St David's (1476-1482).
1476 1478 John Smith Formerly Archdeacon of St David's. Papal provision circa 30 March 1476, consecrated in July 1476, and received possession of the temporalities on 11 September 1476. Died in office on 29 January 1478.
1478 1496 John Marshall Papal provision on 18 May 1478, consecrated on 6 September 1478, and received possession of the temporalities sometime between 18 September–18 December 1478. Died in office sometime between 3 January–23 February 1496.
1496 1499 John Ingleby Formerly Prior of Sheen. Papal provision on 27 June 1496, received possession of the temporalities on 2 September 1496, and consecrated after 6 September 1496. Died in office before 14 November 1499.
1500 1516/17 Miles Salley Consecrated on 26 April 1500 and received possession of the temporalities on 12 May 1500. Also Abbot of Eynsham. Died in office sometime between 29 November 1516 and January 1517.
Source(s):[3][4][5][6][7][8][9]

During the Reformation[edit]

Bishops of Llandaff during the Reformation
From Until Incumbent Notes
1517 1537 George de Athequa Chaplain to Queen Catherine (with whom he left Spain for England). Papal provision on 11 February 1517 and consecrated on 8 March 1517. Resigned in February 1537.
1537 1545 Robert Holgate Elected on 8 March 1537, royal assent on 19 March 1537, and consecrated on 25 March 1537. Also briefly Prior of Watton until the priory was dissolved in 1539. Translated to York on 16 January 1545.
1545 1563 Anthony Kitchin Previously Abbot of Eynsham (1530–1539). Consecrated on 3 May 1545. Died in office on 1563.
Source(s):[7][9][10][11]

Post-Reformation[edit]

Post-Reformation of Bishops of Llandaff
Tenure Tenure Incumbent Notes
Established church bishops
1563 1567 See vacant
1567 1574 Hugh Jones Consecrated on 5 May 1567. Died in office circa 12 November 1574.
1575 1590 William Blethyn Formerly a Prebendary of York. Consecrated on 17 April 1575. Died in office on 15 October 1590.
1591 1595 Gervase Babington Formerly a Prebendary of Hereford. Consecrated on 29 August 1591. Translated to Exeter on 11 March 1595.
1595 1601 William Morgan Consecrated on 20 July 1595. Translated to St Asaph on 17 September 1601.
1601 1617 Francis Godwin Formerly a Canon of Wells. Consecrated on 22 November 1601. Translated to Hereford on 28 November 1617.
1618 1619 George Carleton Also known as George Charlton. Consecrated on 12 July 1618. Translated to Chichester on 20 September 1619.
1619 1627 Theophilus Feild Formerly Rector of Cotton, Suffolk. Consecrated on 10 October 1619. Translated to St David's on 12 July 1627.
1627 1640 William Murray Translated from Kilfenora, Ireland on 24 December 1627. Died in office in February 1640.
1640 1645 Morgan Owen Consecrated on 29 March 1640. Died in office on 4 March 1645.
1645 1646 See vacant
1646 1660 The see was abolished during the Commonwealth and the Protectorate.[12][13]
1660 1667 Hugh Lloyd Consecrated on 2 December 1660. Also Archdeacon of St David's (1644–1667). Held both posts until his death on 7 June 1667.
1667 1675 Francis Davies Formerly Archdeacon of Llandaff (1660–1667). Consecrated on 24 August 1667. Died in office on 14 March 1675.
1675 1679 William Lloyd Formerly a Prebendary of St Paul's, London. Consecrated on 18 April 1675. Translated to Peterborough on 16 May 1679.
1679 1706 William Beaw Formerly Vicar of Adderbury, Oxfordshire. Consecrated on 22 June 1679. Died in office on 10 February 1706.
1706 1724 John Tyler Formerly Dean of Hereford (1692–1706). Consecrated on 30 June 1706. Died in office on 6 July 1724.
1725 1729 Robert Clavering Formerly a Canon of Christ Church, Oxford. Nominated on 14 September 1724 and consecrated on 2 January 1725. Translated to Peterborough on 17 February 1729.
1729 1738 John Harris Formerly a Prebendary of Canterbury. Nominated on 19 September 1729 and consecrated on 19 October 1729. Died in office on 28 August 1738.
1739 1740 Matthias Mawson Formerly Rector of Hadstock, Essex. Nominated on 17 January 1739 and consecrated on 18 February 1739. Translated to Chichester on 21 October 1740.
1740 1748 John Gilbert Formerly Dean of Exeter (1726–1740). Nominated on 31 October 1740 and consecrated on 28 December 1740. Translated to Salisbury on 29 December 1748 then to York on 24 May 1757.
1749 1755 Edward Cresset Formerly Dean of Hereford (1736–1748). Nominated on 7 January 1749 and consecrated on 12 February 1749. Died in office on 13 February 1755.
1755 1761 Richard Newcome Formerly Canon of the Fourth Stall, Windsor (1749-1755). Nominated on 20 March 1755 and consecrated on 13 April 1755. Translated to St Asaph on 9 July 1761.
1761 1769 John Ewer Nominated on 6 August 1761 and consecrated on 28 December 1761. Also Canon of the Sixth Stall, Windsor (1738–1774). Translated to Bangor on 10 January 1769.
1769 1769 Jonathan Shipley Formerly Dean of Winchester (1760–1769). Nominated on 19 January 1769 and consecrated on 12 February 1769. Translated to St Asaph on 8 September 1769.
1769 1782 Shute Barrington Formerly a Canon of St Paul's, London. Nominated on 13 September 1769 and consecrated on 1 October 1769. Translated to Salisbury on 27 August 1782 and then to Durham on 7 July 1791.
1782 1816 Richard Watson Nominated on 30 August 1782 and consecrated on 20 October 1782. Also Archdeacon of Ely (1779–1816) and Regius Professor of Divinity at Cambridge University (1771). Died in office on 4 July 1816.
1816 1819 Herbert Marsh Nominated on 5 August 1816 and consecrated on 25 August 1816. Translated to Peterborough on 28 April 1819.
1819 1826 William Van Mildert Nominated on 5 May 1819 and consecrated on 31 May 1819. Translated to Durham on 24 April 1826.
1826 1827 Charles Sumner Nominated on 25 April 1826 and consecrated on 21 May 1826. Translated to Winchester on 12 December 1827.
1828 1849 Edward Copleston Nominated on 18 December 1827 and consecrated on 13 January 1828. Died in office on 14 October 1849.
1849 1882 Alfred Ollivant Formerly Regius Professor of Divinity at Cambridge University (1843) and a Canon of St David's. Nominated on 9 November 1849 and consecrated on 2 December 1849. Died in office on 16 December 1882.
1883 1905 Richard Lewis Consecrated on 25 April 1883. Died in office on 24 January 1905.
Disestablished church bishops
1905 1931 Joshua Pritchard Hughes Consecrated on 1 June 1905. During his episcopate the Church in Wales was disestabished in 1920. Retired on 24 February 1931 and died on 9 April 1938.
1931 1939 Timothy Rees Consecrated on 25 April 1931. Died in office on 29 April 1939.
1939 1957 John Morgan Translated from Swansea & Brecon. Elected on 22 June 1939 and confirmed on 27 September 1939. Also elected and confirmed Archbishop of Wales in 1949. Held both posts until his death on 26 June 1957.
1957 1971 Glyn Simon Translated from Swansea & Brecon. Elected on 30 July 1957 and confirmed on 25 September 1957. Also elected Archbishop of Wales on 22 May 1968 and confirmed on 13 June 1968. Retired from both posts on 30 June 1971 and died on 14 June 1972.
1971 1975 Eryl Thomas Translated from Monmouth. Elected on 4 October 1971 and confirmed on 7 December 1971. Retired on 9 November 1975 and died in 2001.
1976 1985 John Poole-Hughes Formerly Bishop of South-West Tanganyika (1962-1974) and an Assistant Bishop of Llandaff. Elected on 9 December 1975 and confirmed on 23 January 1976. Retired in 1985 and died on 25 October 1988.
1985 1999 Roy Davies Elected and confirmed in 1985. Retired in 1999 and died on 7 August 2013.
1999 present Barry Morgan Translated from Bangor. Elected and confirmed in 1999. Also was elected Archbishop of Wales in 2002.
Source(s):[14]

Citations[edit]

  1. ^ Williams 1844, p. 73.
  2. ^ a b Baring-Gould & Fisher 1911, pp. 9–10.
  3. ^ a b c d Pearson 2003, pp. 13–17.
  4. ^ Brady 1876, pp. 77–79.
  5. ^ Eubel 1913, pp. 291–292.
  6. ^ Eubel 1914, p. 171.
  7. ^ a b Eubel 1923, p. 218.
  8. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, pp. 293–294.
  9. ^ a b Jones 1965, pp. 21–23.
  10. ^ Brady 1876, pp. 79–80.
  11. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, p. 294.
  12. ^ Plant 2002, pp. 523–537.
  13. ^ King 1968, pp. 523–537.
  14. ^ Fryde et al. 1986, pp. 294–295.

References[edit]