Ancient Diocese of Toul

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Bishopric of Toul
Fürstbistum Tull (de)
Principauté épiscopale de Toul (fr)
State of the Holy Roman Empire
Duchy of Lorraine
1048–1552


Coat of arms

The Three Bishoprics of Verdun, Metz and Toul
Capital Toul
Government Theocracy
Historical era Middle Ages
 •  Bishopric established 365
 •  Acquired territory 1048
 •  Three Bishoprics
    annexed by France
 
1552 1552
 •  Treaty of Westphalia
    recognises annexation
 
1648

The Diocese of Toul was a Roman Catholic diocese seated at Toul in present-day France. It existed from 365 until 1824. From 1048 until 1552 (de jure until 1648), it was also a state of the Holy Roman Empire.

History[edit]

The diocese was located at the western edge of the Holy Roman Empire; it was bordered by France, the Duchy of Bar, and the Duchy of Lorraine. It was annexed to France by King Henry II in 1552, and that was recognized by the Holy Roman Empire in the Peace of Westphalia of 1648. It then was part of the province of the Three Bishoprics.

After the Duchy of Lorraine also became part of France in the 18th century, the Diocese of Toul was merged with the Diocese of Nancy into the Diocese of Nancy-Toul.

The Diocese of Toul belonged to the ecclesiastical province of the Archbishop of Trier.

Bishops[edit]

To 1000[edit]

  • Mansuetus 338–375 (Saint Mansuy), first bishop
  • Amon ca. 400?
  • Alchas ca. 423?
  • Gelsimus ca. 455?
  • Auspicius ca. 478?
  • Ursus around 490
  • Aprus (Aper) 500–507
  • Aladius 508–525?
  • Trifsorich 525–532
  • Dulcitius 532?–549
  • Alodius around 549
  • Premon
  • Antimund
  • Eudolius around 602
  • Theofred 640–653
  • Bodo of Toul ca. 660
  • Eborinus around 664
  • Leudinus 667?–669
  • Adeotatus 679–680
  • Ermentheus ca. 690?
  • Magnald ca. 695?
  • Dodo ca. 705
  • Griboald 706–739?
  • Godo of Toul 739?–756
  • Jakob 756–767
  • Borno 775–794
  • Wannich 794?–813
  • Frotar 814–846
  • Arnulf 847–871
  • Arnald 872–894
  • Ludhelm 895–905
  • Drogo 907–922
  • Gosselin 922–962
  • Gerard I 963–994 (Saint Gerard)

(1026–51)

  • Stephen 994–995
  • Robert 995–996
  • Berthold 996–1019

1000 to 1300[edit]

  • Herman 1020–1026
  • Bruno of Eguisheim, later Pope Leo IX
  • Odo 1052–1069
  • Poppo 1070–1107
  • Richwin of Commercy 1108–1126
    • Conrad I of Schwarzburg 1118–1124
  • Henry I of Lorraine 1127–1167 (Châtenois)
  • Peter of Brixey 1168–1192
  • Odo of Vaudemont 1192–1197
  • Matthias of Lorraine 1197–1206, † 1217
  • Reinald of Chantilly 1210–1217
  • Gerard II of Vaudemont 1218–1219
  • Odo II of Sorcy 1219–1228
  • Garin 1228–1230
  • Roger of Marcey 1231–1251
  • Giles of Sorcy 1253–1271
  • Conrad II of Tübingen 1272–1296
  • John I of Sierck 1296–1305

1300 to 1500[edit]

  • Vito Venosa 1305–1306
  • Odo III of Grançon 1306–1308
  • Giacomo Ottone Colonna 1308–1309
  • John II of Arzillières 1309–1320
  • Amatus of Geneva 1320–1330
  • Thomas of Bourlemont 1330–1353
  • Bertram de la Tour 1353–1361
  • Pietro di la Barreria 1361–1363
  • John III of Hoya 1363–1372
  • John IV of Neufchatel 1373–1384, † 1398
  • Savin de Floxence 1384–1398
  • Philip II de la Ville-sur-Illon 1399–1409
  • Henry II de la Ville-sur-Illom 1409–1436
  • Louis de Haraucourt 1437–1449
  • William Fillatre 1449–1460
  • John V de Chevrot 1460
  • Anthony I of Neufchatel 1461–1495
  • Ulric of Blankenberg 1495–1506

From 1500[edit]

Nicholas Francis, cardinal, duke of Lorraine

References[edit]