Diocese of Norwich

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Diocese of Norwich
Diocese of Norwich arms.svg
Location
Ecclesiastical province Canterbury
Archdeaconries Lynn, Norfolk, Norwich
Statistics
Parishes 563
Churches 656
Information
Cathedral Norwich Cathedral
Current leadership
Bishop Graham James, Bishop of Norwich
Suffragans Alan Winton, Bishop of Thetford
Jonathan Meyrick, Bishop of Lynn
Archdeacons John Ashe, Archdeacon of Lynn
Steven Betts, Archdeacon of Norfolk
Karen Hutchinson, Archdeacon of Norwich
Website
www.dioceseofnorwich.org

The Diocese of Norwich forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England.

History[edit]

It traces its roots in an unbroken line to the diocese of the Bishop of the East Angles founded in 630. In common with many Anglo-Saxon bishoprics it moved, in this case to Elmham in 673. After the Norman invasion it moved to Thetford in 1070 finally moving to Norwich in 1094.

It covers 573 parishes with 656 churches covering all of the county of Norfolk save for the extreme west beyond the River Great Ouse that is part of the diocese of Ely. It includes the deanery of Lothingland (the port of Lowestoft and its immediate hinterland) in the county of Suffolk. This totals an area over 1,800 square miles (4,700 km2) with a population (2008) of some 867,000.

Like most older dioceses, the territory has been gradually reduced. Until the formation of the Diocese of St Edmundsbury and Ipswich in 1914, East Suffolk was included, and earlier other areas.

Organisation[edit]

Bishops[edit]

The Bishop of Norwich (Graham James) leads the diocese and is assisted by two suffragan bishops, the bishop of Thetford (Alan Winton) and the bishop of Lynn (Jonathan Meyrick). The suffragan sees of Ipswich and of Thetford were both created by the Suffragan Bishops Act 1534 but went into abeyance after one incumbent; Thetford was next filled in 1894 and Ipswich in 1899. The See of Ipswich has been in abeyance since before the diocesan see including that city's name was created; a new second suffragan see – of Lynn – was therefore founded in 1963.

Alternative episcopal oversight (for parishes in the diocese which do not accept the ordination of women as priests) is provided by the provincial episcopal visitor, Norman Banks, Bishop suffragan of Richborough, who is licensed as an honorary assistant bishop of the diocese to facilitate his ministry. There are also seven retired bishops living in the diocese who are licensed as honorary assistant bishops:

Deaneries[edit]

The diocese is divided into 21 deaneries:

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Menin, Malcolm James. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 
  2. ^ Garrard, Richard. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 
  3. ^ Leake, David. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 
  4. ^ "Anthony Charles Fottit". Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing. Retrieved 18 June 2016.  (subscription required)
  5. ^ "Peter John Fox". Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing. Retrieved 18 June 2016.  (subscription required)
  6. ^ Gillett, David Keith. ukwhoswho.com. Who's Who. 2014 (December 2013 online ed.). A & C Black, an imprint of Bloomsbury Publishing plc. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 
  7. ^ "Lindsay Goodall Urwin". Crockford's Clerical Directory (online ed.). Church House Publishing. Retrieved 18 June 2016.  (subscription required)

External links[edit]

Coordinates: 52°37′54″N 1°18′04″E / 52.6318°N 1.3010°E / 52.6318; 1.3010