Roman Catholic Archdiocese of Agrigento

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Archdiocese of Agrigento
Archidioecesis Agrigentinus
Cattedrale di San Gerlando.jpg
Agrigento Cathedral
Location
Country Italy
Ecclesiastical province Agrigento
Statistics
Area 3,041 km2 (1,174 sq mi)
Population
- Total
- Catholics
(as of 2006)
461,000
449,000 (97.4%)
Parishes 194
Information
Denomination Catholic Church
Rite Roman Rite
Established 1st Century
Cathedral Cattedrale di S. Gerlando
Current leadership
Pope Francis
Archbishop Francesco Montenegro
Emeritus Bishops Carmelo Ferraro
Map
Arcidiocesi di Agrigento.png
Website
www.diocesiag.it

The Italian Catholic Archdiocese of Agrigento (Latin: Archidioecesis Agrigentinus), in Sicily, was elevated to archiepiscopal status in 2000.[1][2] The historic diocese of Agrigento was also known as the Diocese of Grigenti, and Diocese of Agrigentum. It used to be a suffragan of the archdiocese of Monreale.

History[edit]

Girgenti (the Greek Acragas, Roman Agrigentum) venerates Saint Libertinus as its earliest apostle; he is said to have been sent by Saint Peter. The earliest bishop of certain date is Saint Potamius, a contemporary of Pope Agapetus I (535–36).

Saint Gregory I, Bishop of Agrigentum, said to have been martyred in 262, is probably only a double of the homonymous bishop who was a contemporary of Gregory the Great. The list of bishops, interrupted by the Saracen invasion, began again in 1093 with Saint Gerlando.

Other early bishops include:

Ordinaries since 1326[edit]

...
...

Suffragan sees[edit]

Ecclesiastical province of Agrigento

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Archdiocese of Agrigento Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved April 4, 2016[self-published source]
  2. ^ "Metropolitan Archdiocese of Agrigento" GCatholic.org. Gabriel Chow. Retrieved April 4, 2016
  3. ^ Catholic Encyclopedia article
  4. ^ "Bishop Matteo da Gimara, O.F.M." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 9, 2016
  5. ^ "Bishop Antonio Ponticorona, O.P." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 9, 2016
  6. ^ "Bishop Domenico Xarth, O. Cist." Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved February 9, 2016
  7. ^ "Bishop Francesco del Pozzo" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved July 18, 2016
  8. ^ "Bishop Juan Orozco Covarrubias y Leiva" Catholic-Hierarchy.org. David M. Cheney. Retrieved March 21, 2016

Coordinates: 37°19′N 13°35′E / 37.317°N 13.583°E / 37.317; 13.583