Bismil Azimabadi

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Bismil Azimabadi
Native name
بسمل عظیم آبادی
BornSyed Shah Mohammad Hasan
1901
Azimabad, Patna, Bihar, British India
Died20 June 1978(1978-06-20) (aged 76–77)
Azimabad, Patna, Bihar, India
Resting placeVillage Kurtha, Bihar
Pen nameBismil
OccupationFreedom Fighter, Landlord, Poet
LanguageUrdu, Arabic, Persian, English
NationalityIndian
GenreGhazal, Nazm
Literary movementIndian independence movement
Notable worksSarfaroshi ki Tamanna
Childrenfive sons and three daughters

Bismil Azimabadi (1901 - 1978) was a freedom fighter, landlord, and an Urdu poet from Patna, Bihar.[1][2][3][4]

Family[edit]

Bismil Azimabadi's real name was Syed Shah Muhammad Hasan, he was born in 1901 in Azimabad, Patna, Bihar.[5] His family belonged to the zamidars and they were initially based at Khusrupur, Nawada but were settled at Patna City. Syed Shah Aale Hasan a barrister was his father, he died at an early age of Bismil. His maternal Grandfather Shah Mubarak Kakvi Azimabadi and his maternal uncle, Khan Bahadur Syed Shah Muhiuddin alias Shah Kamal both were poets and were disciple of famous poet of Allahabad Waheed Allahabadi. Bismil died on 20 June 1978 in Azimabad, Patna and was buried at village Kurtha, Bihar, and was survived by five sons and three daughters.[4]

Involvement in independence movement[edit]

Bismil developed the nationalist views and took part in freedom movement, he attended the Calcutta Congress Session in 1920 where he recited his poem Sarfaroshi.[4]

As poet[edit]

His maternal Grandfather and his maternal Uncle both were poets. He grew in Azimabad where the atmosphere was poetic and literary and it was from there he picked up the love for Urdu poetry. He chose the word Bismil (meaning hurt or wounded) as his pen name and became disciple of Khan Bahadur Shad Azimabadi, (1846-1929).[4][6] He used to frequent Qutubkhana Anjuman Taraqqi Urdu Library, Patna.[7] He is counted amongst notable poets of Patna.[8][9]

Works[edit]

Most of his work was lost and the remaining was compiled and published by the name of Hikayat-i-Hasti in 1980 with the help of Khuda Bakhsh Oriental Library.[4] His works are listed in the catalogues of various institutions, like, University of Chicago Library, Delhi Public Library, Delhi University Central Library System, etc.[10] His works have been quoted in magazines & journals like, The London Magazine.[11]

Ghazals[edit]

Bismil have written many ghazals, Sarforoshi being the most celebrated of them all.[12]

Sarfaroshi ki Tamanna[edit]

In 1921 he wrote the patriotic poem Sarfaroshi ki Tamanna,[13][14][15][16] following the Jallianwala Bagh massacre and other atrocities by the British colonialists.[5] The poem was immortalised by Ram Prasad Bismil, an Indian freedom fighter, as a war cry during the British Raj period in India.[17][18][19] It was first published in journal "Sabah", published from Delhi.[20][21][22] The ghazal have 11 couplets.[23] Khuda Bakhsh Library has preserved the original copy and page of his diary containing this poem written by him and the corrections done by his mentor Shad Azimabadi.[4] The famous poem been used in many films like, Shaheed (1965), Sarfarosh (1999), The Legend of Bhagat Singh (2002), Rang de Basanti (2006) and Gulaal (2009).[5]

Other ghazals[edit]

Few other ghazals are,[12]

  • na apne zabt ko ruswa karo sata ke mujhe[24]
  • tang aa gae hain kya karen is zindagi se hum[25]
  • ruKH pe gesu jo bikhar jaenge[26]
  • ab dam-ba-KHud hain nabz ki raftar dekh kar[27]

Sher[edit]

Many of his standalone shers too are found.[28]

Other books[edit]

Following are other works/books/collections by Bismil,

Works about him & his work[edit]

  • Bismil Azimabadi: Shakhsiyat aur Fan by Allama Iqbal[36][37][38]
  • His thoughts are recorded in Guftani Na Guftani, the memoirs of Wamiq Jaunpuri[4]
  • Most of his Kalam was lost and the remaining was compiled and published by the name of Hikayat-i-Hasti in 1980[4]

Recognition[edit]

Bihar Urdu Academy gives an award in his name, known as the "Bismil Azimabadi Award".[39]

See also[edit]

Kakori conspiracy

References[edit]

  1. ^ Choudhury, Pranab Chandra Roy (1971). Bihar District Gazetteers: Patna (& suppl. 2 v.). Superintendant, Secretariat Press, Bihar. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  2. ^ Kumar, Nagendra (1972). Image of Patna. Government of Bihar, Gazetteers Branch; [obtainable from the Superintendent, Government Stationery Stores and Publications]. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  3. ^ Jha, Sudhir Kumar (2005). A new dawn: Patna reincarnated. the University of Michigan. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  4. ^ a b c d e f g h i "Sarfaroshi ki tamanna - Bismil Azimabadi". TAWARIKHKHWANI. 14 December 2019. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  5. ^ a b c Sharjeel, Shahzad (2 January 2020). "'Come to a head'". DAWN.COM. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  6. ^ "Bismil Azimabadi - Profile & Biography". Rekhta. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  7. ^ Jul 30, Sheezan Nezami | Updated:; 2015; Ist, 23:29. "Once a rich Urdu library, now a den of gamblers | Patna News - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 2 June 2020.CS1 maint: extra punctuation (link) CS1 maint: numeric names: authors list (link)
  8. ^ Jha, Sudhir Kumar (2005). A new dawn: Patna reincarnated. Sudhir Kumar Jha.
  9. ^ Kumar, Nagendra (1972). Image of Patna. Government of Bihar, Gazetteers Branch; [obtainable from the Superintendent, Government Stationery Stores and Publications].
  10. ^ "Search Results - "7728708" "8387027"". catalog.lib.uchicago.edu. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  11. ^ Lehmann, John; Ross, Alan (1997). London Magazine. London magazine.
  12. ^ a b "Ghazals of bismil-azimabadi". Rekhta. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  13. ^ Noorani, Abdul Gafoor Abdul Majeed (1996). The trial of Bhagat Singh: politics of justice. Konark. p. 16.
  14. ^ Singh, Dipti (29 January 2016). "79th Anniversary: Khalsa college begins yearlong symposium for unsung heroes". The Indian Express. Retrieved 19 July 2017.
  15. ^ Saigal, Omesh (2002). Shaheed Bhagat Singh: unique martyr in freedom movement. Gyan Pub. House. ISBN 9788121207966. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  16. ^ The Muslim World. Motamar al-Alam al-Islami; World Muslim Congress. 2004. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  17. ^ Sehgal, Anil, ed. (2001). "Ali Sardar Jafri". Lokodaya granthamala. Bharatiya Jnanpith. 685. ISBN 978-8-12630-671-8. Retrieved 20 September 2016.
  18. ^ Muhammad, Shan (2002). Muslims and India's freedom movement. Institute of Objective Studies, New Delhi, India. ISBN 9788185220581. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  19. ^ Hasan, Mushirul (2016). Roads to Freedom: Prisoners in Colonial India. Oxford University Press. ISBN 9780199089673. Retrieved 6 December 2017.
  20. ^ Ulhaque, T. M. Zeya (November 2013). "Bismil Azimabadi : Life Sketch". Spritualworld.com. Archived from the original on 4 March 2016. Retrieved 20 September 2016.
  21. ^ "Interview of Syed Masood Hasan, Grandson of Bismil Azimabadi". Hindustan Times (Patna) (in Hindi). 17 May 2015. Retrieved 17 May 2015.
  22. ^ "तो 'सरफ़रोशी की तमन्ना..' एक बिहारी बिस्मिल ने लिखी है !!". PatnaBeats. 5 August 2016. Retrieved 17 November 2017.
  23. ^ "Read full ghazal 'Sarfaroshi ki Tamanna' by Bismil Azimabadi". Rekhta. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  24. ^ "Read full ghazal 'na apne zabt ko' by Bismil Azimabadi". Rekhta. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  25. ^ "Read full ghazal 'tang aa gae hai' by Bismil Azimabadi". Rekhta. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  26. ^ "Read full ghazal 'ruKH pe gesu' by Bismil Azimabadi". Rekhta. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  27. ^ "Read full ghazal 'ab dam-ba-KHud hain' by Bismil Azimabadi". Rekhta. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  28. ^ "Shayari of Bismil Azimabadi". Rekhta. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  29. ^ Iqbāl, murattib, Muḥammad (2008). Kalām-i Bismil (1st ed.). Dihlī: Ejūkeshnal Pablishing Hāʼūs. ISBN 9788182234406.
  30. ^ Bismil, Sayyid Shāh Muḥammad Ḥasan.; Iqbāl, Muḥammad (2008). Kalām-i Bismil (in Urdu) (1st ed. ed.). Dihlī: Ejūkeshnal Pablishing Hāʼūs. ISBN 978-81-8223-440-6. Retrieved 17 November 2017.CS1 maint: extra text (link)
  31. ^ "Klam-E-Bismil Edited by Mohammad Iqbal". Delhi Public Library. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  32. ^ Bismil, Sayyid Shāh Muḥammad Ḥasan.; Iqbāl, Muḥammad (2010). Camanistān-i Bismil: Sayyid Shāh Muḥammad Ḥasan Bismil ʻAẓīmābādī] (in Urdu) (1st ed. ed.). Delhi: Kitabi Duniya. Retrieved 17 November 2017.CS1 maint: extra text (link)
  33. ^ "Delhi University Library System (DULS), Central Library, List of Additions, From 01/01/2016 to 31/01/2016, Page 14 of 43" (PDF). crl.du.ac.in. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  34. ^ "Chamanistaan-e-Bismil by Mohammad Iqbal". Delhi Public Library. Retrieved 17 November 2017.
  35. ^ "Chamanistaan-e-Bismil : Sayed Shah Mohammad Hasan Bismil Azimabadi / edited by Mohammad Iqbal". Delhi Public Library. Retrieved 2 June 2020.
  36. ^ Iqbāl, Muḥammad (2008). Bismil ʻAẓīmābādī: shak̲h̲ṣiyat aur fan (in Urdu) (1st ed. ed.). Dihlī: Ejūkeshnal Pablishing Hāʼūs. ISBN 978-81-8223-433-8.CS1 maint: extra text (link)
  37. ^ Iqbāl, Muḥammad (2008). Bismil ʻAẓīmābādī : shak̲h̲ṣiyat aur fan (1st ed.). Dihlī: Ejūkeshnal Pablishing Hāʼūs. ISBN 9788182234338.
  38. ^ Books, WonderClub. "Bismil Azimabadi: Shakhsiyat Aur Fan written by Muhammad Iqbal". wonderclub.com. Retrieved 17 November 2017.
  39. ^ "Latest Pathankot News 29/03/2016: गजलकार प्रवीन अश्क को बिस्मिल अजीमाबादी अवार्ड" (in Hindi). www.bhaskar.com. 29 March 2016. Retrieved 20 September 2016.

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