Bitch Planet

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Bitch Planet
Cover art for Bitch Planet #1 by Valentine De Landro
Publication information
Publisher Image Comics
Schedule Monthly (loosely)
Format Ongoing series
Genre Feminist Dystopian
Publication date December 2014 to April 2017
No. of issues 10
Main character(s) Kamau Kogo (Kam)
Penny Rolle
Fanny
Renelle
Creative team
Written by Kelly Sue DeConnick
Artist(s) Valentine De Landro

Bitch Planet is an American comic book published by Image Comics, created by writer Kelly Sue DeConnick and artist Valentine De Landro. The series is a feminist portrayal of the exploitation film genre and takes place in a dystopian reality, where non-compliant women are sent to an off-planet prison.[1][2]

Publication history[edit]

DeConnick and De Landro first met at a fan expo in Toronto, Canada.[3] DeConnick liked De Landro's work (particularly the heavy use of blacks and shades to portray character emotion)[3] after which the two exchanged information and planned to collaborate on a Marvel comic. However, they did not find any opportunities to do so, and decided to create their own comic series instead. De Landro chose Bitch Planet over two other projects DeConnick was also writing.[3] Most of the cover art is done by De Landro, though every third issue contains illustrations by a guest artist.

DeConnick described the book's creation as being "born of a deep and abiding love for exploitation and women in prison movies of the '60s and '70s".[3] Both creators wanted to include the intriguing and difficult aspects of women's lives in prison and to change the narrative of female oppression. DeConnick made a point to include female nudity in the comic in ways to exhibit the female body without the purpose of sexual arousal.[1]They planned to include the backstory of an inmate every third issue before discovering the Netflix series, Orange Is the New Black, which has a similar plot. They decided to continue with the idea and avoid watching the TV series in order to avoid its influence.[1]

Each issue ends with a segment called "Bitch Fest", containing a letter from DeConnick relating to the comic, politics, and feminist topics. The segment also contains "Bitches Be Like", which is where the usually-feminist guest authors write a short passage relating to topics discussed within the issue. In addition, the segment often includes tweets from fans in a subsection titled "Itty Bitty Bitchy", as well as photos and fan art from fans in the subsection "Bitch Face."[4] The back page of every issue includes satirical comic book ads for Missed Connections, and typical comic book products like X-ray specs, with a feminist twist.[4]

Every issue and volume has been published by Image Comics and is available in both print and digital form. After the publication of Bitch Planet #10, an anthology-style series called "Bitch Feature: Triple Feature" began, with each issue containing three stories by different writers and artists.

Title Publication Date Issue # Diamond ID
Bitch Planet #1 December 10, 2014 1 OCT140578
Bitch Planet #2 January 28, 2015 2 NOV140643
Bitch Planet #3 February 18, 2015 3 DEC140721
Bitch Planet #4 April 29, 2015 4 JAN150670
Bitch Planet #5 Septenber 9, 2015 5 FEB150593
Bitch Planet #6 January 6, 2016 6 NOV150504
Bitch Planet #7 February 17, 2016 7 DEC150546
Bitch Planet #8 June 22, 2016 8 JAN160572
Bitch Planet #9 November 2, 2016 9 FEB160567
Bitch Planet #10 April 26,2017 10 MAR160556
Bitch Planet: Triple Feature Publication Date Issue # Diamond ID
Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #1 June 14, 2017 1 APR170731
Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #2 July 19, 2017 2 MAY170657
Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #3 August 16, 2017 3 JUN170731
Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #4 September 20, 2017 4 JUL170778
Bitch Planet: Triple Feature #5 October 18, 2017 5 AUG170607
Collected Editions Publication Date Issues Included Diamond ID
Bitch Planet, Volume 1: Extraordinary Machine TP October 7, 2015 1–5 MAY150482
Bitch Planet, Volume 2: President Bitch TP May 31, 2017 6–10 MAY160684
Bitch Planet: Triple Feature Volume 1 December 13, 2017 1-5 OCT170620

Plot[edit]

The series focuses on women who have been imprisoned for being "non-compliant" in an off-planet prison called the Auxiliary Compliance Outpost. The narrative arc moves through time, presenting how the women were arrested in the first place as well as their various experiences within the prison.

Reception[edit]

Reaction to Bitch Planet has been generally positive.[5] Susana Polo at The Mary Sue said: "Bitch Planet promised space prison, violence, a heck of a lot of ladies of various colors, and a reclamation of the 'women in prison' subgenre of exploitation film for the modern audience. Its first issue delivers".[6] Jeff Lake, writing for IGN, called it "an excellent comic".[7] Chris Sims of Comics Alliance, reviewing the first issue, claimed that "it's thrilling, it's violent, and it's one of the best first issues of the year".[8] The first volume of the comic got more mixed reviews from The Guardian, which praised the series as a "refreshing foray into the feminist exploitation genre", while also criticizing it for the use of "lots of ingredients...without much forethought" that led to muddled critiques of religion and politics.[9]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c Hudson, Laura (11 December 2014). "The Only Comic About Gladiator Women in Space Prison You Will Ever Need". Wired. Condé Nast. Retrieved 13 December 2014. 
  2. ^ "Bitch Planet: The Feminist Exploitation Comic You Desperately Need". io9. December 30, 2014. Retrieved February 25, 2015. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Kelly Sue DeConnick Tackles Exploitation Tropes in 'Bitch Planet'". Hero Complex. January 24, 2014. Retrieved February 25, 2015. 
  4. ^ a b DeConnick, Kelly Sue (2015). Bitch Planet 1. Berkley,CA: Image Comics. pp. ALL. 
  5. ^ "Bitch Planet #1". Comic Book Roundup. Archived from the original on February 25, 2015. Retrieved February 25, 2015. 
  6. ^ "Review: Kelly Sue DeConnick's Bitch Planet #1". The Mary Sue. Retrieved May 9, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Bitch Planet #1 Review". IGN. December 10, 2014. Retrieved February 25, 2015. 
  8. ^ "A Seething Hell of Steel And Stone And Women Behind Bars: 'Bitch Planet' #1 [Review]". Comics Alliance. December 10, 2014. Archived from the original on March 22, 2015. Retrieved February 25, 2015. 
  9. ^ King-Slutzky, Johannah (2015-03-06). "Welcome to Bitch Planet: The Comic That's Reimagining Feminism". The Guardian. Retrieved 2016-07-07. 

External links[edit]