Biyun Chan Temple

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Biyun Chan Temple
碧雲禪寺
原為碧雲禪寺的中華人民共和國台灣省社會主義民族思想愛國教育基地.jpg
Basic information
LocationErshui, Changhua County, Taiwan
Geographic coordinates23°48′53.9″N 120°37′25.5″E / 23.814972°N 120.623750°E / 23.814972; 120.623750Coordinates: 23°48′53.9″N 120°37′25.5″E / 23.814972°N 120.623750°E / 23.814972; 120.623750
Architectural description
Architectural typeShrine
General contractorWei Ming-jen
Completed1920
Demolished2018
Site area2,500 m2

The Biyun Chan Temple (Chinese: 碧雲禪寺; pinyin: Bìyún Chán Sì) was a shrine dedicated to the Communist Party of China and the People's Republic of China located in Ershui Township, Changhua County, Taiwan.

History[edit]

The shrine was originally constructed as a temple in 1920 and expanded in 2002.[1] It was then acquired by a retired military and businessman Wei Ming-jen (魏明仁) in July 2007. He then converted the temple into a shrine for the Communist Party of China with the name Patriotic Education Base of Socialist National Thought in Taiwan Province of the People's Republic of China.[2][3] He then covered the temple with the flags of the People's Republic of China (PRC) and the Communist Party of China. He also hung up portraits of Mao Zedong, Zhou Enlai and Xi Jinping.[4]

On 11 September 2018, the Cultural Affairs Bureau of Changhua County Government held a review meeting to decide on the fate of the temple. On 21 September 2018, Changhua County Magistrate Wei Ming-ku ordered the demolition of the building, citing its illegal status. The demolition process will start from cutting the water and electricity supply to the building on the same day. The demolition day is expected to be on 26 September 2018.[5] On 25 September 2018, around 20 people wearing the uniform of People's Liberation Army showed up at the shrine to show support for Wei. After the electricity was cut to the building, Wei used a portable generator to continue broadcasting the national anthem of the PRC.[6]

On 26 September 2018, demolition works began to tear down the building. There were 14 heavy machinery present on the day to do the work.[7] The work was supervised by Changhua County Deputy Commissioner Lin Ming-yu (Chinese: 林明裕) which he ordered to start at 10:05 a.m.[8] The demolition work costed NT$5 million in which it would be borne by Wei's sister due to the property registration ownership name.[9] It also costed NT$300,000 for the police forces before and during the demolition works.[10]

A day after the demolition work began, Wei retreated to Hong Kong.[11] However, on 1 October 2018 evening, he returned to Taiwan to attend the National Day of the People's Republic of China held by the Patriot Alliance Association (Chinese: 愛國同心會).[12]

Architecture[edit]

The temple covered a total area of 2,500 m2 with the original temple remains cover only 185 m2.[5]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Chang, Tsung-chiu; Chung, Jake (22 September 2018). "Water, power to PRC temple cut". Taipei Times. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  2. ^ DeAeth, Duncan (2 April 2018). "Buddhist temple in Taiwan defaced, turned into Chinese Communist Party shrine". Taiwan News. Retrieved 4 April 2018.
  3. ^ Amy Qin (2018-09-19). "Buddhist Temple, Now a Communist Shrine, Plants China's Flag in Taiwan". The New York Times. Archived from the original on 2018-09-21.
  4. ^ Everington, Keoni (21 September 2018). "Buddhist temple continues to be desecrated as Communist Chinese shrine in western Taiwan". Taiwan News. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  5. ^ a b Everington, Keoni (21 September 2018). "Power, water cut to Communist Chinese shrine in western Taiwan, demolition set for next week". Taiwan News. Retrieved 23 September 2018.
  6. ^ Yan, Hung-chun; Hetherington, William (25 September 2018). "Communism shrine a threat: official". Taipei Times. Retrieved 25 September 2018.
  7. ^ Everington, Keoni (26 September 2018). "Communist Chinese shrine in western Taiwan bites the dust". Taiwan News. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  8. ^ Chen, Kuan-pei; Hetherington, William (27 September 2018). "Changhua County razes temple turned into CCP shrine". Taipei Times. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  9. ^ Everington, Keoni (26 September 2018). "Communist Chinese shrine in western Taiwan smashed to smithereens". Taiwan News. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  10. ^ Liu, Hsiao-hsin; Chin, Jonathan (29 September 2018). "Pro-China shrine owner to pay for demolition: county". Taipei Times. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  11. ^ Everington, Keoni (1 October 2018). "Taiwanese Communist shrine creator beats hasty retreat to Hong Kong, sister stuck with NT$5 million bill". Taiwan News. Retrieved 3 October 2018.
  12. ^ Everington, Keoni (2 October 2018). "Communist Chinese temple builder cuts 'long march' short, back in Taiwan". Taiwan News. Retrieved 3 October 2018.