Black-shouldered opossum

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Black-shouldered Opossum)
Jump to: navigation, search
Black-shouldered opossum
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Infraclass: Marsupialia
Order: Didelphimorphia
Family: Didelphidae
Subfamily: Caluromyinae
Genus: Caluromysiops
Sanborn, 1951
Species: C. irrupta
Binomial name
Caluromysiops irrupta
Sanborn, 1951
Black-shouldered Opossum area.png
Black-shouldered opossum range

The black-shouldered opossum (Caluromysiops irrupta), also known as the white-eared opossum is an opossum known from western Brazil and southeastern Peru. It was first described by Colin Campbell Sanborn, curator of Field Museum of Natural History, in 1951. The black-shouldered opossum is characterized by a gray coat, gray underbelly, and broad black stripes that extend from the forefeet, meet on the shoulders, run along the midline of the back and then split into parallel stripes that run down the hindfeet. Little is known of the behavior of the black-shouldered opossum. It is nocturnal (active mainly at night) and arboreal (tree-living); it is known to feed on fruits and rodents. The opossum inhabits humid forests. The IUCN classifies it as least concern.

Taxonomy[edit]

The black-shouldered opossum is the sole member of Caluromysiops, and is placed in the family Didelphidae. It was first described by Colin Campbell Sanborn, curator of Field Museum of Natural History, in 1951.[2] No subspecies are recognized.[3]

The cladogram below, based on a 2016 study, shows the phylogenetic relationships of the brown-eared woolly opossum.[4]





Bushy-tailed opossum (Glironia venusta)


Caluromyinae

Black-shouldered opossum (Caluromyopsis irrupta)




Derby's woolly opossum (Caluromys derbianus)




Bare-tailed woolly opossum (Caluromys philander)



Brown-eared woolly opossum (Caluromys lanatus)








Kalinowski's mouse opossum (Hyladelphys kalinowskii)




Marmosini




Didelphini



Thylamyini







Description[edit]

The black-shouldered opossum is characterized by a gray coat, gray underbelly with buff-tipped hairs, and broad black stripes that extend from the forefeet, meet on the shoulders, run along the midline of the back and then split into parallel stripes that run down the hindfeet. Indistinct dark lines run through the eyes. 60 to 75 percent of the length of the tail is darker than the coat dorsally (on the back), while the rest is white. Except for the last 75 percent of the length at the base, the tail is bushy. Like Caluromys species, its fur is soft, thick and woolly, and has a similar skull. However, it differs from them in having a shorter rostrum and larger molars.[5] The head-and-body length is between 25 and 33 centimetres (9.8 and 13.0 in) and the tail measures 31–40 centimetres (12–16 in). The hindfeet measure 6.7 centimetres (2.6 in), while the ears 3.7 centimetres (1.5 in).[6]

Ecology and behavior[edit]

Little is known of the behavior of the black-shouldered opossum. It is nocturnal (active mainly at night) and arboreal (tree-living). It spends a significant amount of time on trees, mainly on high branches. Studies suggest individual diet preferences; the opossums feed on rodents as well as fruits. Lifespan in captivity has been known to exceed seven years.[5][6] Up to two young have been recorded.[7]

Distribution and status[edit]

The black-shouldered opossum occurs in humid forests of western Brazil and southeastern Peru, and probably in Bolivia as well. It is known only from five different localities. The IUCN classifies it as least concern given its wide distribution and presumably large population. A possible threat to their survival is deforestation.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Patterson, B. & Solari, S. (2008). "Caluromysiops irrupta". IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Version 2008. International Union for Conservation of Nature. Retrieved 28 December 2008. 
  2. ^ Gardner, A.L. (2005). "Order Didelphimorphia". In Wilson, D.E.; Reeder, D.M. Mammal Species of the World: A Taxonomic and Geographic Reference (3rd ed.). Johns Hopkins University Press. p. 4. ISBN 978-0-8018-8221-0. OCLC 62265494. 
  3. ^ Gardner, A.L., ed. (2007). Mammals of South America. 1. Chicago, US: University of Chicago Press. pp. 11–2. ISBN 978-0-226-28242-8. 
  4. ^ Amador, L.I.; Giannini, N.P. (2016). "Phylogeny and evolution of body mass in didelphid marsupials (Marsupialia: Didelphimorphia: Didelphidae)". Organisms Diversity & Evolution: 1–17. doi:10.1007/s13127-015-0259-x. 
  5. ^ a b Nowak, R.M. (2005). Walker's Marsupials of the World. Baltimore, US: Johns Hopkins University Press. pp. 88–9. ISBN 978-0-8018-8211-1. 
  6. ^ a b Eisenberg, J.F.; Redford, K.H. (1999). The Central Neotropics: Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil. Chicago, US: University of Chicago Press. p. 83. ISBN 978-0-226-19542-1. 
  7. ^ Hayssen, V.; Tienhoven, A.; Tienhoven, A. (1993). Asdell's Patterns of Mammalian Reproduction: A Compendium of Species-specific Data (Rev. 2nd ed.). Ithaca, US: Cornell University Press. pp. 12–8. ISBN 978-0-8014-1753-5. 

External links[edit]