Black Dog Institute

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The Black Dog Institute, founded in 2002 and based in Sydney, Australia, is a not-for-profit facility for diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mood disorders such as depression and bipolar disorder.[1]

Research[edit]

The Black Dog Institute undertakes research into the prevention, early intervention and treatment of depression and bipolar disorder.[2] [3]They partner with the Australian Centre for Research Excellence in Suicide Prevention (CRESP) concerned with lowering suicide rates in Australia. According to CRESP, suicide is the most common cause of death in Australians aged 15-44 years – more common than deaths from motor vehicle accidents or skin cancer and the tenth most common cause of death overall for Australian males.[4] The problem is worse in rural and regional areas, according to a 2012 study by Griffith University. [5]

The Black Dog Institute launched “Men’s Health Study” in 2014, with the aim of identifying ways to prevent male suicides and developing mental health tools designed specifically for men.[6]

Services[edit]

The Black Dog Institute runs three clinics available to Australian residents; Depression, Bipolar Disorders and Psychology clinic. Additionally, the facility offers seminars and workshops on mood disorders, well being and related topics. The Black Dog Institute has developed a range of online tools including: myCompass, BITE BACK, and self-tests for depression, bipolar disorder, personality and workplace well being.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.blackdoginstitute.org.au/aboutus/overview.cfm Black Dog Institute About Us page
  2. ^ Australia, Black Dog Institute. "Research areas". www.blackdoginstitute.org.au. Retrieved 2016-03-15. 
  3. ^ "Black Dog Institute - Research". www.health.nsw.gov.au. Retrieved 2016-03-15. 
  4. ^ "About Us CRESP". The Centre of Research Excellence in Suicide Prevention. Retrieved 2016-03-15. 
  5. ^ "Suicide the second biggest killer of those 15 to 29: report". The Daily Examiner. 2014-09-05. Retrieved 2016-05-03. 
  6. ^ "'Men actually do want help' to discuss suicidal thoughts, Black Dog Institute finds". ABC News. Retrieved 2016-03-15. 

External links[edit]