Black River (1957 film)

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Black River
Kuroi kawa poster.jpg
Original Japanese theatrical poster
Directed by Masaki Kobayashi
Starring Ineko Arima
Fumio Watanabe
Tatsuya Nakadai
Tomo Nagai
Keiko Awaji
Distributed by Shochiku
Release dates
  • October 23, 1957 (1957-10-23)[1]
Running time
114 minutes
Country Japan
Language Japanese

Black River (黒い河 Kuroi kawa?) is a 1957 Japanese film directed by Masaki Kobayashi.[1] The story follows a university student who moves into an apartment building and becomes involved with a waitress. The landlord then attempts to evict the tenants and sell the building through illicit means. The film was screened at the 2005 New York Film Festival in a theatrical retrospective celebrating the Shochiku Company's 110th year.[2]

Cast[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Various sources alternately put the year of release in 1956 or 1957.
    "Black River". Shochiku. Retrieved 2009-06-30. Year: 1956 
    Richie, Donald (2005). A Hundred Years of Japanese Film: A Concise History, with a Selective Guide to DVDs and Videos. Kodansha International. p. 163. ISBN 4-7700-2995-0. Black River (Kuroi kawa, 1956) 
    黒い河 (in Japanese). Japanese Movie Database. Retrieved 2009-06-30. 1956.10.23 
    "黒い河" (in Japanese). Shochiku Online. Retrieved 2009-06-30. 制作年: 1957年 
    "黒い河 (邦画)" (in Japanese). Kinema Junpo. Retrieved 2009-06-30. 公開年月日: 1957/10/23 
    Desser, David (May 1988). Eros Plus Massacre: An Introduction to the Japanese New Wave Cinema. Indiana University Press. p. 42. ISBN 0-253-31961-7. Kuroi kawa (Black River, 1957) 
    Shapiro, Michael (December 1991). "Japan and the U.S. Share an Uneasy Artistic Peace". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-06-30. Masaki Kobayashi's 'Black River' (1957) 
    "Tatsuya Nakadai Filmography". The Criterion Collection. Archived from the original on 2007-12-13. Retrieved 2009-06-30. Black River (Kuroi kawa) Masaki Kobayashi, 1957 
    "Kuroi Kawa". AllMovie. Retrieved 2009-06-30. Year: 1957 
  2. ^ "The Beauty of the Everyday: Japan's Shochiku Company at 110". Film Society of Lincoln Center. 2005. Retrieved 2009-06-30. 

External links[edit]