Black college football national championship

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The black college football national championship is a national championship won by the best football team(s) among Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) in the United States.

History[edit]

In college football's early years, HBCUs generally lacked the opportunity to compete against predominantly white schools due to segregation, which was practiced in much of the U.S. at the time—leaving HBCUs with few scheduling options other than to play themselves only and sponsor their own championships.

The first football game between HBCU schools was played on December 27, 1892. On that day Johnson C. Smith defeated Livingstone. As it was the only game played by HBCU schools that year, Johnson C. Smith's team could no doubt claim to be that season's HBCU national champions by default. However, the earliest documented claim to such a title was Livingstone's 1906 team, led by captain Benjamin Butler "Ben" Church.[1] It is not immediately clear who designated Livingstone as the best team—or if they simply declared themselves champions.

Initially, starting in 1920, an HBCU national champion was simply declared by the Pittsburgh Courier at the end of the season. The following year others more directly associated with the schools themselves made their own attempts to crown a champ, coordinating their efforts under the auspices of the Champion Aggregation of All Conferences. The CAAC's initiative was fostered by Paul Jones, who reported the champion annually in his column in Spalding's Intercollegiate Football Guide.[2]

The first game between an HBCU and predominantly white school occurred in the 1948 Fruit Bowl when Southern defeated San Francisco State, 30–0.[3] Starting five years after that game, HBCUs began to gravitate over to the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics because it offered numerous athletic competition options while also openly welcoming schools of varying demographic backgrounds as members.[4] At present most HBCUs are now members of the National Collegiate Athletic Association. However, designating an annual black national champion has remained a popular tradition, even as HBCUs have successfully challenged majority white schools for football championships for decades now, within the framework of both NCAA and NAIA competition; this includes Associated Press, United Press International, NCAA, and NAIA-sponsored titles for the 1962, 1973, 1978, 1990, 1992, and 1995 seasons, as well as runner-up finishes in 1963, 1983, 1991, 1994, and 2012.

Noteworthy team accomplishments include the sixteen championships won all-time by Tennessee State and the five won consecutively by Central State from 1986–90 (all five under coach Billy Joe). Florida A&M and Grambling State have won titles in seven different decades. Noteworthy coaching accomplishments include the nine championships won by Joe (seven at Central State and two at Florida A&M), John Merritt (one at Jackson State and eight at Tennessee State), and Eddie Robinson (all nine at Grambling). Rod Broadway has won titles at three different schools (two at North Carolina Central, one at Grambling, and one at North Carolina A&T).

Championship bowl games[edit]

Attempts have been made over the years to determine a non-mythical national champion with an actual football game contested by leading teams among HBCUs throughout the United States. The Orange Blossom Classic was often billed as such a game, but Florida A&M, as its annual host, was guaranteed a spot in this game and was not always of national championship-caliber each year that it was played between 1933 and 1978 (indeed, the Rattlers were even accused of taking advantage of a system where most selectors named their national champions before the postseason; if the Rattlers were not named champs by any selector before the postseason, they still got a second chance at the claim by winning the Orange Blossom Classic[5]).

Contests including the Colored Championships of 1920 and 1923 (which happened to feature members of the Central Intercollegiate Athletic Association, although the games were not played for the conference title), the Chocolate Bowl (1935), the Steel and Vulcan bowls (1940–41), the National Bowl (1947), and the National Football Classic (1954) were attempted periodically but without any sustained success.

The Pelican Bowl, a bowl game that tried to match up the conference champions from the Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference and the Southwestern Athletic Conference, was another such example—and actually did manage to last several seasons—but even this venture failed to draw enough attendance and lasted only a few years in the 1970s. Similarly, the Heritage Bowl was played in the 1990s featuring teams from the MEAC and SWAC, but this bowl game has not been held since 1999 and was often snubbed by the conference champions in lieu of the NCAA's Division I-AA playoffs.

The two conferences began negotiations in 2010 to create a successor called the "Legacy Bowl"—not to be confused with the later exhibition game with the same name—to begin during the 2011 postseason, but it was voted down by MEAC officials.[6] However, in 2015 the first Air Force Reserve Celebration Bowl was played, pitting the champions of both conferences. While the Celebration Bowl's trophy itself only includes the inscription "Celebration Bowl Champions,"[7] the bowl's creator (ESPN),[8][9] as well as its title sponsor (Air Force Reserve)[10][11] and other sponsors,[12][13][14] have indicated that it is for the HBCU national title—as have coaches of participating teams.[15][16]

In other sports[edit]

While black national champions have been crowned regularly in football for nearly a century, the concept has never fully caught on with other sports. Men's basketball briefly had a similar movement. In 1941 Southern, coached by the famed football coach Ace Mumford, defeated North Carolina Central, 48–42, in the National Invitational Intercollegiate Basketball Tournament. This tournament was held because the National Invitational Tournament would not invite majority black schools at the time. NCCU was also named national champions that same year by the Associated Negro Press.[17] In late 1947 National Championships, Inc. announced that they would soon begin hosting a postseason basketball tournament for HBCUs.[18] Jet magazine later sponsored an HBCU basketball poll.[19] In much more recent years, various websites have named champions for basketball and baseball. BlackCollegeBaseball.com, for example, has named several black national champions for baseball, including North Carolina A&T and Southern jointly in 2005 and Prairie View A&M in 2006. Bethune-Cookman also defeated Alcorn State in a special postseason series in 2011.

Selectors[edit]

Not all black national championships are the same. Early poll rankings were for the best overall HBCU, while bowl games often matched champions of only two specific HBCU conferences. However, the NCAA and NAIA later split into divisions, and newer selectors have tended to rank HBCU members by division only (e.g., the Football Championship Subdivision level of NCAA Division I, NCAA Division II).[20]

Selector Name Seasons Eligible teams
ADW Atlanta Daily World & 100% Wrong Club–W. A. Scott II Memorial Trophy (1953–1992,[21] 2010[22]); Coca-Cola National Historical Black College Football Championship Award (1993–2009)[21] 1953[23]–2010[22]
(1970 and 2010 champions are not available)
all HBCU teams
AFRCB Air Force Reserve Celebration Bowl 2015–present MEAC and SWAC champions only
AHSR-I Add's HBCU Sports Report (Add Seymour, Jr.)
for Division I teams[24]
2013–present[25] NCAA Division I–FCS HBCU teams only
AHSR-II Add's HBCU Sports Report (Add Seymour, Jr.)
for Division II teams[26]
2013–present[25] NCAA Division II HBCU teams only
ANP Associated Negro Press (Pigskin Huddle) 1948–1960
(1955–1957 champions are not available)
all HBCU teams
ASW American Sports Wire (Dick Simpson[27]) 1990–2013[28] NCAA Division I–FCS HBCU teams only[29]
B-CP Boxtorow (& formerly Black Athlete Sports Network)–Coaches Poll 2009–present[30] all HBCU teams
B-MP Boxtorow (& formerly Black Athlete Sports Network)–Media Poll 2007–present[30] all HBCU teams
BAA Baltimore Afro-American 1947[31]–1948,[32] 1953[5] all HBCU teams
BCNC-I Black College National Championship
for Division I teams[33]
2016–present[33] NCAA Division I–FCS HBCU teams only
BCNC-II Black College National Championship
for Division II teams[33]
2016–present[33] NCAA Division II HBCU teams only
BCSP Black College Sports Page (Carl "Lut" Williams & formerly Major Broadcasting Cable) 1994–present[34]
(1995–1999 champions are not available)
all HBCU teams
CAAC Champion Aggregation of All Conferences (William Lawrence "Paul" Jones)[2] 1921–1949[34]
(1921–1925, 1927–1928, 1930–1932, and 1936–1949 champions are not available)
all HBCU teams
CB Chocolate Bowl 1935[35] all HBCU teams
CC Colored Championship 1920,[36] 1923[37] all HBCU teams
DCCC-M Dr. Cavil's Classic Cuts (Jafus Kenyatta Cavil & formerly SWAC Page Network)–Major Division Poll 2002–present[38]
(2002 champion is not available)
NCAA Division I–FCS HBCU teams only
DCCC-MM Dr. Cavil's Classic Cuts (Jafus Kenyatta Cavil & formerly SWAC Page Network)–Mid-Major Division Poll 2002–present[38] NCAA Division II and NAIA HBCU teams only
HB Heritage Bowl 1994 * MEAC and SWAC champions only
HBCUS-PFP HBCUSports.com–Playoff Fan Poll 2014[39] all HBCU teams
HBCUS-UP HBCUSports.com–Ultimate Poll 2015[40] all HBCU teams
HSRN-I Heritage Sports Radio Network–HSRN Conaway Cup
for Division I teams[41]
2011–present[41] NCAA Division I–FCS HBCU teams only
HSRN-II Heritage Sports Radio Network–HSRN Conaway Cup
for Division II[41] and NAIA[42] teams
2011–present[41] NCAA Division II and NAIA HBCU teams only
J Jet (Frank T. Bannister, Jr.[43][44]) 1973–1987 all HBCU teams
JBM John B. "Johnny" McLendon, Jr.
based on the Dickinson System[45]
1953[45] all HBCU teams
LAFCF Los Angeles Football Classic Foundation–Eddie G. Robinson Trophy[46] (Fred H. Cooper) 1988[46] all HBCU teams
MBN Mutual Black Network 1972–1977
(1973 champion is not available)
all HBCU teams[47]
NB National Bowl 1947[48] all HBCU teams[18]
NFC National Football Classic 1954[49] CIAA and Midwestern Conference champions only[50]
PB Pelican Bowl 1972, 1974–1975 * MEAC and SWAC champions only
PCW Pigskin Club of Washington—William G. "Billy" Coward Award[51] 2006–present[51]
(2014–2016 champions are not available)
all HBCU teams
"SBN Poll"[52]
  PC
  NPC
  SBN
  AURN

Jake Gaither National Championship Trophy[53]
  Pittsburgh Courier
  New Pittsburgh Courier
  Sheridan Broadcasting Network
  American Urban Radio Networks

1920–present[54]
  1920–1965
  1966–1978
  1979[55]–1990
  1991–present
all HBCU teams
TAJTT T. A. Jones' Talented 10th (Trevin A. Jones)[56] 2014[56] all HBCU teams
"Vulcan Bowl"
  SB
  VB


Steel Bowl
Vulcan Bowl

1940–1941 **
  1940[57]
  1941[58]
Southern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference champion and all HBCU teams outside of the SIAC[58]

Notes: *—the Pelican Bowl (played 1972 and 1974–75) and Heritage Bowl (played 1991–99) were intended as black national championship games matching the outright champions or top-seeded co-champions of the MEAC and SWAC conferences, but in practice the top seeds often declined their automatic bids to participate in the NCAA playoffs instead—only the 1972, 1975, and 1994 games matched the top seeds of both conferences as originally intended, although the Pelican Bowl is known to have been promoted as a black national championship game all three seasons;[59][60][61][62][63][64] **—the Steel Bowl/Vulcan Bowl (played after the 1940–48 and 1951 seasons) is known to have been promoted as a black national championship game after the 1940 and 1941 seasons

Yearly national championship selections[edit]

Season Champion(s) Record Coach Selector(s) Note(s)
1920 Howard 7–0–0 W. Edward "Ed" Morrison CC, PC
Talladega 5–0–1 Jubie Barton Bragg PC
1921 Talladega 6–0–1 Jubie Barton Bragg PC
Wiley 7–0–1 Jason Grant PC
1922 Hampton 6–1–0 Gideon Edward Smith PC
1923 Howard 7–0–1 Louis L. "Lou" Watson CC tied Lincoln–Pennsylvania in the Colored Championship game, 6–6[65]
Lincoln–Pennsylvania 5–1–2 James H. Law CC tied Howard in the Colored Championship game, 6–6[65]
Virginia Union 6–0–1 Harold D. Martin PC
1924 Paul Quinn 8–0–1 Harry J. "Little" Long PC
Tuskegee 9–0–1 Cleveland Leigh "Cleve" Abbott PC
1925 Howard 6–0–2 Louis L. "Lou" Watson PC
Tuskegee 8–0–1 Cleveland Leigh "Cleve" Abbott PC
1926 Howard 7–0–0 Louis L. "Lou" Watson CAAC,[66] PC
Tuskegee 10–0–0 Cleveland Leigh "Cleve" Abbott PC
1927 Bluefield State 8–0–1 Harry Jefferson PC
Tuskegee 10–0–1 Cleveland Leigh "Cleve" Abbott PC
1928 Bluefield State 8–0–1 Harry Jefferson PC
Wiley 10–0–1 Fred Thomas "Pop" Long PC
1929 Tuskegee 9–0–0 Cleveland Leigh "Cleve" Abbott CAAC,[67] PC
1930 Tuskegee 11–0–1 Cleveland Leigh "Cleve" Abbott PC
1931 Wilberforce 9–0–0 Harry Graves PC
1932 Wiley 9–0–0 Fred Thomas "Pop" Long PC
1933 Kentucky State 4–3–0 Henry Arthur Kean CAAC[68]
Morgan State 9–0–0 Edward Paulette "Ed" Hurt PC
1934 Kentucky State 9–0–0 Henry Arthur Kean CAAC,[68] PC
1935 Kentucky State 9–1–0 Henry Arthur Kean CAAC[68]
Texas College 9–0–2 Arnett William "Ace" Mumford CB, PC
1936 Virginia State 7–0–2 Harry Jefferson PC
West Virginia State 8–0–0 Adolph P. "Ziggy" Hamblin PC
1937 Morgan State 7–0–0 Edward Paulette "Ed" Hurt PC
1938 Florida A&M 8–0–0 William M. "Big Bill" Bell, Sr. PC
1939 Langston 9–0–0 Caesar Felton "Zip" Gayles PC
1940 Morris Brown 10–1–0 Artis P. Graves PC, SB
1941 Langston 10–1–0 Caesar Felton "Zip" Gayles VB record includes forfeited game (was 9–1–1)[69]
Morris Brown 8–1–0 William J. "Billy" Nicks PC
1942 Florida A&M 9–0–0 William M. "Big Bill" Bell, Sr. PC
1943 Morgan State 5–0–0 Edward Paulette "Ed" Hurt PC
1944 Morgan State 6–1–0 Edward Paulette "Ed" Hurt PC
1945 Wiley 10–0–0 Fred Thomas "Pop" Long PC
1946 Morgan State 8–0–0 Edward Paulette "Ed" Hurt PC
Tennessee State 10–1–0 Henry Arthur Kean PC
1947 Shaw 10–0–0 Howard K. "Brutus" Wilson NB, PC
Tennessee State 10–0–0 Henry Arthur Kean BAA, PC
1948 Central State 9–1–1 Gaston F. "Country" Lewis BAA
Southern 12–0–0 Arnett William "Ace" Mumford ANP,[70] BAA, PC
1949 Morgan State 8–0–0 Edward Paulette "Ed" Hurt PC
Southern 10–0–1 Arnett William "Ace" Mumford ANP,[71] PC
1950 Florida A&M 8–1–1 Alonzo Smith "Jake" Gaither PC
Southern 10–0–1 Arnett William "Ace" Mumford ANP,[71] PC
1951 Morris Brown 10–1–0 Edward J. "Ox" Clemons PC
North Carolina A&T 7–1–1 William M. "Big Bill" Bell, Sr. ANP[72]
1952 Florida A&M 8–2–0 Alonzo Smith "Jake" Gaither ANP,[73] PC
Lincoln-Missouri 8–0–1 Dwight T. Reed PC
Texas Southern 10–0–1 Alexander "Alex" Durley PC
Virginia State 8–1–0 Sylvester R. "Sal" Hall PC
1953 Florida A&M 10–1–0 Alonzo Smith "Jake" Gaither BAA
Prairie View A&M 12–0–0 William J. "Billy" Nicks ADW,[74] ANP,[5] PC
Tennessee State 8–0–1 Henry Arthur Kean JBM
1954 Florida A&M 8–1–0 Alonzo Smith "Jake" Gaither ADW,[75] PC
North Carolina Central 7–1–1 Herman Henry Riddick NFC
Prairie View A&M 10–1–0 William J. "Billy" Nicks ADW,[75] PC
Southern 10–1–0 Arnett William "Ace" Mumford ADW,[75] PC
Tennessee State 10–1–0 Henry Arthur Kean ADW,[75] ANP,[76] PC
1955 Grambling State 10–0–0 Eddie Gay Robinson, Sr. ADW,[77] PC
1956 Tennessee State 10–0–0 Howard Cornelius Gentry, Sr. ADW,[78] PC
1957 Florida A&M 9–0–0 Alonzo Smith "Jake" Gaither ADW,[79] PC
1958 Prairie View A&M 10–0–1 William J. "Billy" Nicks ADW,[75] ANP,[80] PC retired W. A. Scott II Memorial Trophy as first three-time winner[75]
1959 Florida A&M 10–0–0 Alonzo Smith "Jake" Gaither ADW,[81] ANP,[82] PC
1960 Southern 9–1–0 Arnett William "Ace" Mumford ADW,[83] ANP,[84] PC
1961 Florida A&M 10–0–0 Alonzo Smith "Jake" Gaither ADW,[85] PC
1962 Florida A&M 9–1–0 Alonzo Smith "Jake" Gaither ADW[85] retired W. A. Scott II Memorial Trophy as first three-time winner since the previous trophy had been retired;[86]
won AP Small College Poll National Championship
Jackson State 10–1–0 "Big" John Ayers Merritt PC
1963 Prairie View A&M 10–1–0 William J. "Billy" Nicks ADW,[87] PC
1964 Prairie View A&M 9–0–0 William J. "Billy" Nicks ADW,[86] PC
1965 Tennessee State 9–0–1 "Big" John Ayers Merritt ADW,[88] PC
1966 Tennessee State 10–0–0 "Big" John Ayers Merritt ADW,[89] NPC
1967 Grambling State 9–1–0 Eddie Gay Robinson, Sr. ADW,[90] NPC
Morgan State 8–0–0 Earl C. Banks NPC
1968 Alcorn State 9–1–0 Marino H. "The Godfather" Casem ADW,[91] NPC
North Carolina A&T 8–1–0 Hornsby Howell NPC
1969 Alcorn State 8–0–1 Marino H. "The Godfather" Casem ADW,[92] NPC
1970 Tennessee State 11–0–0 "Big" John Ayers Merritt NPC
1971 Tennessee State 9–1–0 "Big" John Ayers Merritt ADW,[93] NPC
1972 Grambling State 11–2–0 Eddie Gay Robinson, Sr. ADW,[94] MBN,[95] NPC, PB record includes forfeited game (was 10–2–0)[96]
1973 Tennessee State 10–0–0 "Big" John Ayers Merritt ADW,[97] J,[98] NPC retired W. A. Scott II Memorial Trophy as first three-time winner since the previous trophy had been retired;[97]
won AP and UPI NCAA Division II Poll National Championships;
had players ruled ineligible for NCAA Division II Playoffs and declined bid[99]
1974 Alcorn State 9–2–0 Marino H. "The Godfather" Casem NPC
Grambling State 11–1–0 Eddie Gay Robinson, Sr. ADW, J,[100] MBN,[101] NPC, PB
1975 Grambling State 10–2–0 Eddie Gay Robinson, Sr. ADW, J,[102] MBN,[103] NPC record includes forfeited game (was 10–1–0)[104]
Southern 9–3–0 Charles "Charlie" Bates PB
1976 South Carolina State 10–1–0 Willie E. Jeffries ADW, J,[105] MBN,[106] NPC
1977 Florida A&M 11–0–0 Rudy Hubbard ADW, J,[107] MBN,[108] NPC
Grambling State 10–1–0 Eddie Gay Robinson, Sr. NPC
South Carolina State 9–1–1 Willie E. Jeffries NPC
1978 Florida A&M 12–1–0 Rudy Hubbard ADW, J,[109] NPC won NCAA Division I-AA Playoff National Championship
1979 Tennessee State 8–3–0 "Big" John Ayers Merritt ADW, J,[110] SBN
1980 Grambling State 10–2–0 Eddie Gay Robinson, Sr. ADW, J,[111] SBN
1981 South Carolina State 10–3–0 William R. "Bill" Davis ADW, SBN
Virginia Union 11–1–0 Willard Bailey J[112]
1982 South Carolina State 9–3–0 William R. "Bill" Davis ADW
Tennessee State 9–0–1 "Big" John Ayers Merritt J,[113] SBN record does not include voided games (was 10–1–1)[114]
1983 Central State 12–1–0 William "Billy" Joe J[115]
Grambling State 8–1–2 Eddie Gay Robinson, Sr. SBN
Tennessee State 8–2–1 "Big" John Ayers Merritt ADW
1984 Alcorn State 9–1–0 Marino H. "The Godfather" Casem ADW, SBN
Tennessee State 11–0–0 William A. "Bill" Thomas J[116]
1985 Hampton 10–2–0 Fred Freeman J[117]
Jackson State 8–3–0 William C. "W. C." Gorden ADW, SBN
1986 Central State 10–1–1 William "Billy" Joe ADW, J,[118] SBN
1987 Central State 10–1–1 William "Billy" Joe J,[119] SBN
Howard 0–10–0 Willie E. Jeffries ADW record includes forfeited games (was 9–1–0)[120]
1988 Central State 11–2–0 William "Billy" Joe ADW, LAFCF, SBN
1989 Central State 10–3–0 William "Billy" Joe ADW, SBN
1990 Central State 11–1–0 William "Billy" Joe ADW, SBN won NAIA Division I Champion Bowl National Championship
North Carolina A&T 9–2–0 William "Bill" Hayes ASW
1991 Alabama State 11–0–1 Houston Markham, Jr. ADW, ASW, AURN
1992 Central State 12–1–0 William "Billy" Joe ADW won NAIA Division I Champion Bowl National Championship
Grambling State 10–2–0 Eddie Gay Robinson, Sr. ASW, AURN
1993 Howard 11–1–0 Steven Anthony "Steve" Wilson ADW, AURN[121]
Southern 11–1–0 Pete Richardson ASW
1994 Hampton 10–1–0 Joe Taylor AURN
South Carolina State 10–2–0 Willie E. Jeffries ADW, ASW,[122] BCSP,[123] HB
1995 Southern 11–1–0 Pete Richardson ADW, ASW, AURN
1996 Howard 10–2 Steven Anthony "Steve" Wilson ADW, AURN[124]
Jackson State 10–2 James "Big Daddy" Carson ASW
1997 Southern 11–1 Pete Richardson ADW, ASW, AURN
1998 Florida A&M 11–2 William "Billy" Joe ASW, AURN
Southern 9–3 Pete Richardson ADW
1999 North Carolina A&T 11–2 William "Bill" Hayes ADW, ASW, AURN
2000 Grambling State 10–2 Douglas Lee "Doug" Williams ASW
Tuskegee 12–0 Rick Comegy ADW, AURN, BCSP[125]
2001 Florida A&M 7–4 William "Billy" Joe ADW
Grambling State 11–0 Douglas Lee "Doug" Williams ASW, AURN, BCSP[125] record includes forfeited game (was 10–1)[126]
Tuskegee 11–1 Rick Comegy BCSP[125]
2002 Bethune-Cookman 11–2 Alvin B. "Al" Wyatt BCSP[127]
Fayetteville State 10–2 Kenny Phillips DCCC-MM[128]
Grambling State 11–2 Douglas Lee "Doug" Williams ADW, ASW, AURN, BCSP[127]
2003 Albany State 10–2 James Michael "Mike" White DCCC-MM[128]
Southern 12–1 Pete Richardson ADW, ASW, AURN, BCSP,[129] DCCC-M[130]
2004 Albany State 11–1 James Michael "Mike" White ADW, BCSP,[131] DCCC-MM[132]
Hampton 10–2 Joe Taylor ASW, AURN, DCCC-M[133]
2005 Grambling State 11–1 Melvin Spears AURN, BCSP,[134] DCCC-M[135]
Hampton 11–1 Joe Taylor ADW, ASW
North Carolina Central 10–2 Roderick Craig "Rod" Broadway DCCC-MM[136]
2006 Hampton 10–2 Joe Taylor ASW, BCSP,[137] DCCC-M[138]
North Carolina Central 11–1 Roderick Craig "Rod" Broadway ADW, AURN, BCSP,[137] DCCC-MM,[138] PCW
2007 Delaware State 10–2 Alton "Al" Lavan ASW, DCCC-M[139]
Tuskegee 12–0 Willie James Slater ADW, AURN, B-MP, BCSP,[140] DCCC-MM,[141] PCW
2008 Grambling State 11–2 Roderick Craig "Rod" Broadway ADW, ASW, AURN, B-MP, BCSP,[142] DCCC-M,[143] PCW
South Carolina State 10–3 Oliver "Buddy" Pough BCSP[142]
Tuskegee 10–1 Willie James Slater DCCC-MM[144]
2009 Prairie View A&M 9–1 Henry Frazier III ASW, BCSP,[145] DCCC-M[146]
South Carolina State 10–2 Oliver "Buddy" Pough ADW,[147] AURN, B-CP, B-MP, BCSP,[145] PCW
Tuskegee 10–2 Willie James Slater DCCC-MM[148]
2010 Albany State 11–1 James Michael "Mike" White AURN, BCSP,[149] DCCC-MM,[150] PCW
Bethune-Cookman 10–2 Brian O'Neal Jenkins ASW, B-CP, B-MP
Texas Southern 0–3 John "Johnnie" Cole DCCC-M[151] record does not include vacated games (was 9–3)[152]
2011 Alabama State 8–3 Reggie Devon Barlow DCCC-M[153]
Norfolk State 0–3 Pete Adrian ASW, B-CP, HSRN-I[41] record does not include vacated games (was 9–3)[154]
Winston-Salem State 13–1 Connell Maynor AURN, B-MP, BCSP,[155] DCCC-MM,[153] HSRN-II,[41] PCW
2012 Arkansas–Pine Bluff 10–2 Monte Leon Coleman ASW, B-CP, HSRN-I[156]
Bethune-Cookman 9–3 Brian O'Neal Jenkins AURN
Tennessee State 8–3 Roderick "Rod" Reed DCCC-M[157]
Winston-Salem State 14–1 Connell Maynor B-MP, BCSP,[158] DCCC-MM,[157] HSRN-II,[159] PCW
2013 Bethune-Cookman 10–3 Brian O'Neal Jenkins AHSR-I,[25] B-CP, B-MP, DCCC-M,[160] PCW
Tennessee State 10–4 Roderick "Rod" Reed ASW, AURN, BCSP,[161] HSRN-I[159]
Winston-Salem State 10–2 Connell Maynor AHSR-II,[25] DCCC-MM,[162] HSRN-II[159]
2014 Alcorn State 10–3 Jay Hopson AHSR-I,[163] AURN, B-CP, B-MP, BCSP,[164] DCCC-M,[162] HSRN-I,[162] TAJTT
Virginia State 10–2 Latrell Scott AHSR-II,[165] DCCC-MM,[162] HBCUS-PFP[39] HSRN-II[162]
2015 North Carolina A&T 10–2 Roderick Craig "Rod" Broadway AFRCB, AHSR-I,[166] AURN,[167] B-CP,[168] B-MP,[168] BCSP,[169] DCCC-M,[170] HBCUS-UP,[40] HSRN-I[42]
Tuskegee 10–3 Willie James Slater AHSR-II,[171] DCCC-MM,[170] HSRN-II[42]
2016 Grambling State 12–1 Broderick Lee Fobbs AFRCB,[172] AHSR-I,[24] AURN,[52] B-CP,[173] B-MP,[173] BCNC-I,[33] BCSP,[174] DCCC-M,[175] HSRN-I[176]
Tuskegee 9–3 Willie James Slater AHSR-II[25]
Winston-Salem State 9–3 Kienus P. Boulware BCNC-II,[33] DCCC-MM,[128] HSRN-II[176]

National championships by school[edit]

School National championships Seasons
Tennessee State 16 1946, 1947, 1953, 1954, 1956, 1965, 1966, 1970, 1971, 1973, 1979, 1982, 1983, 1984, 2012, 2013
Grambling State 15 1955, 1967, 1972, 1974, 1975, 1977, 1980, 1983, 1992, 2000, 2001, 2002, 2005, 2008, 2016
Florida A&M 14 1938, 1942, 1950, 1952, 1953, 1954, 1957, 1959, 1961, 1962, 1977, 1978, 1998, 2001
Tuskegee 13 1924, 1925, 1926, 1927, 1929, 1930, 2000, 2001, 2007, 2008, 2009, 2015, 2016
Southern 11 1948, 1949, 1950, 1954, 1960, 1975, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1998, 2003
Central State 8 1948, 1983, 1986, 1987, 1988, 1989, 1990, 1992
Howard 7 1920, 1923, 1925, 1926, 1987, 1993, 1996
Morgan State 7 1933, 1937, 1943, 1944, 1946, 1949, 1967
South Carolina State 7 1976, 1977, 1981, 1982, 1994, 2008, 2009
Hampton 6 1922, 1985, 1994, 2004, 2005, 2006
Prairie View A&M 6 1953, 1954, 1958, 1963, 1964, 2009
Alcorn State 5 1968, 1969, 1974, 1984, 2014
North Carolina A&T 5 1951, 1968, 1990, 1999, 2015
Bethune-Cookman 4 2002, 2010, 2012, 2013
Wiley 4 1921, 1928, 1932, 1945
Winston-Salem State 4 2011, 2012, 2013, 2016
Albany State 3 2003, 2004, 2010
Jackson State 3 1962, 1985, 1996
Kentucky State 3 1933, 1934, 1935
Morris Brown 3 1940, 1941, 1951
North Carolina Central 3 1954, 2005, 2006
Virginia State 3 1936, 1952, 2014
Alabama State 2 1991, 2011
Bluefield State 2 1927, 1928
Langston 2 1939, 1941
Talladega 2 1920, 1921
Texas Southern 2 1952, 2010
Virginia Union 2 1923, 1981
Arkansas–Pine Bluff 1 2012
Delaware State 1 2007
Fayetteville State 1 2002
Lincoln–Missouri 1 1952
Lincoln–Pennsylvania 1 1923
Norfolk State 1 2011
Paul Quinn 1 1924
Shaw 1 1947
Texas College 1 1935
West Virginia State 1 1936
Wilberforce 1 1931

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Images From The Past: Ben B. Church". theblackcollegefootballmuseum.org. Retrieved September 25, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b Gerald L. Smith, Karen Cotton McDaniel, & John A. Hardin (ed.). "Jones, Paul William Lawrence". The Kentucky African American Encyclopedia (p. 287). 
  3. ^ "Former Southern football great Warren Braden dies". theadvocate.com. June 21, 2016. Retrieved January 30, 2017. 
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