Blackmagic Design

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Blackmagic Design Pty Ltd.
Proprietary limited
Industry Digital cinema
Manufacturing
Founded 2001; 17 years ago (2001)
Founder Grant Petty
Headquarters 11 Gateway Court, Port Melbourne, Victoria, 3207, Australia
Number of locations
8 offices (2016)[1]
Area served
Worldwide
Key people
Grant Petty (CEO)
Products Digital movie cameras
Digital cinematography
Video editing software
Website blackmagicdesign.com

Blackmagic Design is an Australian digital cinema company and manufacturer based in Port Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. It designs and manufactures broadcast and cinema hardware, most notably digital movie cameras, and also develops video editing software.

History[edit]

The company was founded in 2001 by Grant Petty[2] and produced their first product in 2002,[2][3] a capture card for macOS called DeckLink that was the first to offer uncompressed 10-bit video.[3] The company later released new versions of the card[4][5][6][7][8][9] and added color correction capabilities,[10] support for Microsoft Windows,[11] and full support for Adobe Premiere Pro and Microsoft DirectShow.[12] In 2005 the company released several products, including the Multibridge family of PCIe bi-directional converters and the FrameLink family of DPX-based software.[13][14] In 2006 the company released Blackmagic On-Air television production software.[15] In 2009 the company acquired Da Vinci Systems, a company that had won Emmy Awards for film colouring and restoration equipment. In 2010 the company acquired Echolab, a manufacturer of vision mixers. In 2011, the company acquired Teranex, a developer of video processing products.

At the 2012 NAB Show Blackmagic announced their first Cinema Camera,[16] soon after the company had acquired Cintel.[17] In 2015 the company acquired eyeon Software, the original authors of Blackmagic Fusion, previously named eyeon Fusion. In 2016 the company acquired Fairlight.[18]

Products[edit]

Broadcast Hardware[edit]

Blackmagic's first and main products have been broadcast video hardware, including live production switchers, real-time compositing processors, Cintel scanners, signal converters, and video monitors. The company then began producing similar products for the filmmaking industry, including cinema cameras and video monitors with integrated recording options.

Cinema Cameras[edit]

  • Cinema Camera family: cinema cameras with internal recording ranging from 1080p to 4K, up to 60fps, and 13 claimed stops of DR.
  • Production Camera family: cameras designed for live broadcast, all the models are able to record up to 30fps at 4K, 60fps at 1080p and deliver 12 stops of DR.
  • URSA family: professional upgradeable cameras capable of both cinema and broadcast recordings, different models ranging from 4K to 4.6K, up to 60 fps at native resolution, and from 12 to 15 stops of DR.

Editing Software[edit]

  • DaVinci Resolve: Non-linear editing system originally developed by Da Vinci Systems. Although the latest versions are fully featured for video editing it's still better known by its original capabilities in color correction and grading. Blackmagic distributes both a free and paid version of the software. The cost for the paid version of DaVinci Resolve is $299 (as of 2018).
  • Fusion: fully featured compositing software, originally developed by eyeon Software. Blackmagic distributes both a free and paid version of the software.

DaVinci Resolve will merge with Fusion from version 15.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Blackmagic Design: Offices Worldwide". Blackmagic Design. Retrieved 29 November 2016.
  2. ^ a b "Blackmagic Design founder Grant Petty on how a "burning revelation" led him to create his $300 million video technology company". SmartCompany. 11 July 2017. Retrieved 21 January 2018.
  3. ^ a b "Price Barrier for Uncompressed Video Slashed". Blackmagic Design. 1 November 2002. Retrieved 29 November 2016.
  4. ^ "DeckLink 2 Available Immediately". Blackmagic Design. 18 February 2003. Retrieved 29 November 2016.
  5. ^ "DeckLink Pro Advanced SDI Video Card". Blackmagic Design. 2 April 2003. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  6. ^ "DeckLink SP High-End Analog Video Card". Blackmagic Design. 2 April 2003. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  7. ^ "DeckLink HD Plus™ Announced". Blackmagic Design. 10 September 2004. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  8. ^ "DeckLink Multibridge™ Announced". Blackmagic Design. 10 September 2004. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  9. ^ "Workgroup Videohub™ Announced". Blackmagic Design. 10 September 2004. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  10. ^ "World's First Real Time Uncompressed Color Correction". Blackmagic Design. 4 February 2003. Retrieved 29 November 2016.
  11. ^ "DeckLink Support for Microsoft Windows™". Blackmagic Design. 29 March 2003. Retrieved 29 November 2016.
  12. ^ "Price Barrier Slashed with Blackmagic DeckLink Extreme". Blackmagic Design. 19 March 2004. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  13. ^ "Blackmagic Design Introduces Multibridge Family; World's First Bi-Directional Converter with PCI Express". Blackmagic Design. 18 April 2005. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  14. ^ "Blackmagic Design Introduces FrameLink, a New Software Utility for Instant DPX Compatibility". Blackmagic Design. 18 April 2005. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  15. ^ "Blackmagic Design Announces Blackmagic On-Air -- The First Affordable Live HD Television Production Studio". Blackmagic Design. 24 April 2006. Retrieved 30 November 2016.
  16. ^ "NAB 2012: Blackmagic Unveils Surprise 2.5K Cinema Camera for Unprecedented $3,000". 16 April 2012. Retrieved 21 January 2018.
  17. ^ "Blackmagic Acquires Assets of Film Scanner Maker Cintel". 24 July 2012. Retrieved 21 January 2018.
  18. ^ "Blackmagic Design Announces the Acquisition of Fairlight". Fairlight. 9 September 2016. Retrieved 29 November 2016 – via Blackmagic Design.

External links[edit]