Blanca Fernández Ochoa

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Blanca Fernández Ochoa
Alpine skier
Blanca Fernández Ochoa.jpg
Fernández Ochoa in October 2006
DisciplinesGiant Slalom, Slalom, Combined, Super-G
Born(1963-04-22)22 April 1963
Madrid, Spain
Died24 August 2019(2019-08-24) (aged 56)
La Peñota, Cercedilla, Spain
Height168 cm (5 ft 6 in)
RetiredMarch 1992 - (age 28)
Olympics
Teams4 – (1980, 1984, 1988, 1992)
Medals1 (bronze)
World Championships
Teams6 – (19801991)
Medals0
World Cup
Seasons10 – (19821992)
Wins4 – (1 GS, 3 SL)
Podiums20 – (12 GS, 8 SL)
Overall titles0 – (4th in 1988)
Discipline titles0 – (3rd, three times)

Blanca Fernández Ochoa (22 April 1963 – 24 August 2019)[1] was a World Cup alpine ski racer from Spain. Born in Madrid, she competed in four Winter Olympics, from 1980 through 1992.

Career[edit]

Her four siblings all competed in alpine ski racing for Spain in the Winter Olympics: Dolores, Francisco, Juan Manuel, and Luis. Francisco (1950-2006) won the gold medal in slalom at the 1972 Olympics in Sapporo, Japan.[citation needed]

She received the Premio Reina Sofía for best athlete in 1983 and 1988 by Consejo Superior de Deportes at Premios Nacionales del Deporte.[2] She also received the Real Orden del Mérito Deportivo in 1994.[3] At the 1992 Olympics at Albertville, France, Blanca won the bronze medal in slalom.[citation needed]

During her World Cup career, she had 4 victories, 20 podiums, and 69 top ten finishes.[4]

On July 18, 1991, she married Italian Daniel Fioretto in the Monastery of El Escorial. They ended up divorcing and she contracted a second marriage with David Fresneda, with whom she had two children, David (born 2000) and Olivia (born 1999), although this marriage also ended in divorce.[5] The children live with their father.[1]

She was reported as missing on 23 August 2019[6] and found dead by a police officer on 4 September 2019 near La Peñota, in the Guadarrama Mountains.[7][8] Policía Nacional believed it was not an accidental death in a safe area and there were not traumas.[9] On 5 September 2019 it was declared she died from a suicide because lithium tablets and a bottle of wine were found near her body.[10] She died the same day of the disappearance at the age of 56.[11]

World Cup results[edit]

Season standings[edit]

Season Age Overall  Slalom  Giant
 Slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
1982 18 55 28 not run
1983 19 27 26 not
awarded
1984 20 36 27 19
1985 21 10 16 7 8
1986 22 31 10 31 19
1987 23 8 18 3 9
1988 24 4 4 5 3 9
1989 25 18 8 19 26
1990 26 injured, did not compete
1991 27 10 3 17
1992 28 7 3 8 53

Points were only awarded for top ten finishes thru 1979, top 15 thru 1991 (see scoring system).

Race victories[edit]

  • 4 wins (1 GS, 3 SL)
  • 20 podiums (12 GS, 8 SL), 69 top tens
Season Date Location Discipline
1985 3 March 1985 United States Vail, USA Giant slalom
1988 26 November 1987 Italy Sestriere, Italy Slalom
1991 22 December 1990 France Morzine, France Slalom
1992 1 December 1991 Austria Lech, Austria Slalom

World Championship results[edit]

  Year    Location   Age   Slalom  Giant
 Slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
1980 Lake Placid, USA 16 18 not
run
1982 Schladming, Austria 18
1985 Bormio, Italy 21 14 9 DNF
1987 Crans-Montana, Switzerland 23 5 5 10
1989 Vail, USA 25 4 7
1991 Saalbach, Austria 27 DNF

From 1948 through 1980, the Winter Olympics were also the World Championships for alpine skiing.
At the World Championships from 1954 through 1980, the combined was a "paper race" using the results of the three events (DH, GS, SL).

Olympic results[edit]

  Year    Location   Age   Slalom  Giant
 Slalom 
Super-G Downhill Combined
1980 Lake Placid, USA 16 18 not
run
not
run
1984 Sarajevo, Yugoslavia 20 DNF2 6
1988 Calgary, Canada   24 5 DNF2 21
1992 Albertville, France 28 3 12

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b La Policía descarta la muerte accidental y violenta de Blanca Fernández Ochoa , elconfidencial.com, 4 September 2019
  2. ^ "Histórico de premiados en los Premios Nacionales del Deporte". Consejo Superior de Deportes (in Spanish). Ministerio de Cultura y Deporte. Archived from the original on 8 October 2015. Retrieved 17 October 2014.
  3. ^ Merino, Juan Manuel (22 December 1994). "El deporte español premia a todos sus héroes" (PDF). mundodeportivo.com. Retrieved 23 January 2017.
  4. ^ Pacor, Matteo (15 March 2008). "Blanca Fernández-Ochoa". ski-db.com. Archived from the original on 3 October 2008. Retrieved 24 October 2009.
  5. ^ Verdades, mentiras y muchas incógnitas en la desaparición de Blanca Fernández Ochoa, elcierredigital.com 3. September 2019
  6. ^ "Blanca Fernandez Ochoa: Winter Olympic medallist reported missing". BBC World. BBC News. BBC. 1 September 2019. Retrieved 3 September 2019.
  7. ^ Durán, Luis F.; Alsedo, Quico (4 September 2019). "Hallan muerta a Blanca Fernández Ochoa". El Mundo.
  8. ^ "Un agente fuera de servicio localizó el cadáver de Blanca Fernández Ochoa cuando paseaba con su perro por el pico de La Peñota". La Sexta Noticias (in Spanish). Atresmedia Corporación de Medios de Comunicación, S.A. 4 September 2019. Retrieved 5 September 2019.
  9. ^ F. Durán, Luis; Alsedo, Quico (5 September 2019). "La Policía cree que la muerte de Blanca Fernández Ochoa no fue accidental". El Mundo (in Spanish). Unidad Editorial Información General, S.L.U. Retrieved 5 September 2019.
  10. ^ Morcillo, Cruz (5 September 2019). "Hallan pastillas de litio y una botella de vino junto al cadáver de Blanca Fernández Ochoa". ABC (in Spanish). Vocento. Retrieved 5 September 2019.
  11. ^ "Blanca Fernández Ochoa habría muerto el día de su desaparición y no presenta un golpe en la cabeza". Antena 3 Noticias (in Spanish). Antena 3. Atresmedia Corporación de Medios de Comunicación, S.A. 4 September 2019. Retrieved 5 September 2019.

External links[edit]