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Bleed American

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Bleed American
A collection of bowling trophies sitting on top of a cigarette machine
Studio album by
ReleasedJuly 24, 2001 (2001-07-24)
RecordedOctober–November 2000
Studio
Genre
Length46:38
LabelDreamWorks
Producer
Jimmy Eat World chronology
Singles
(2000)
Bleed American
(2001)
Futures
(2004)
Singles from Bleed American
  1. "Bleed American"
    Released: June 5, 2001
  2. "The Middle"
    Released: November 19, 2001
  3. "Sweetness"
    Released: June 3, 2002
  4. "A Praise Chorus"
    Released: 2002

Bleed American is the fourth studio album by American rock band Jimmy Eat World, released on July 24, 2001, by DreamWorks Records. Originally released as Bleed American, it was re-released as Jimmy Eat World following the September 11 attacks on New York and Washington, D.C., which took place seven weeks after its initial release. The Jimmy Eat World title stayed until 2008 upon its re-release with its original title returned.

Following a lack of recognition for their third studio album Clarity (1999) from Capitol Records, the band departed from the label in late 1999. Aside from working odd jobs, the band toured to raise money for their next album. It was recorded with Mark Trombino and the band as producers in Los Angeles in October and November 2000 at the Cherokee and Harddrive studios. The musical style was more direct and accessible than its predecessor, with simpler chord structures.

"Bleed American" was released to radio on June 5, 2001 as the album's lead single, coinciding with tours of Australia and Japan (the latter supporting Eastern Youth). After appearing on the East Coast dates of the Warped Tour, the band supported Blink-182 and Weezer. "The Middle" was released as a single on November 19, 2001. The band went on a headlining European tour in early 2002, followed by a Japanese tour, leading up to a two-month support slot for Blink-182 and Green Day on their Pop Disaster Tour. "Sweetness" was released as the third single on June 3, 2002. The band supported Incubus in Australia, before embarking on headlining tours of the UK and the US. "A Praise Chorus" was released as a promotional single during 2002.

Each single from Bleed American managed to enter the top twenty of at least one US chart. The most successful was "The Middle", which reached the number-one spot on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart and number five on the Billboard Hot 100. In March 2002, Bleed American was certified gold by the Recording Industry Association of America, and was certified platinum that August after its sales reached over one million copies. As of September 2016, the album has sold over 1.6 million copies. Bleed American appeared on several publications' best-of-the-year album lists, by the likes of Addicted to Noise, CMJ, and Kerrang!, among others, as well as all-time lists by publications such as Consequence of Sound, NME, and Spin.

Background[edit]

In February 1999, Jimmy Eat World released their third studio album, Clarity, through Capitol Records.[1] Frontman Jim Adkins recalled that the label was disorganized at the time, due to having a new president and new people in charge of each department. As a result of this, any trust the band had within the company had dissipated.[2] Capitol initially started to shelve the album until a few key radio stations started playing the song "Lucky Denver Mint".[1] The release of the album marked the end of their two-record deal with the label, which was made official in August 1999.[2][3] Drummer Zach Lind recalled that the label "really didn't believe in us. But in a way, that was sort of a good thing, because it let us take control of what we needed to do. We learned we had to do it ourselves, because no one else would do it for us."[4]

Due to a lack of funds, the members had taken up odd jobs: Adkins sold art supplies; Linton did construction work; Burch sold auto parts; and Lind worked at a car dealership.[5] In August 2000, Jimmy Eat World released the compilation album Singles through the independent label Big Wheel Recreation, which included B-sides and unreleased songs from the band up to that point.[1] They went on a five-week tour of Europe; they bought copies of their previous releases from Capitol at cost value to sell them directly in that territory.[3][5] The band's management were against the idea of this tour as they did not even have a stronghold in the United States. They decided to breakaway with their management to work as free agents. The tour was ultimately considered a success, with Clarity selling 500 copies a week by that point.[5] After this, they released a split EP with Jebediah in September 2000.[6]

Recording[edit]

Bleed American was produced by Mark Trombino and Jimmy Eat World.[7] Trombino had already produced two of the band's previous studio albums: Static Prevails (1996)[8] and Clarity (1999),[9] as well as Blink-182's breakthrough album, Dude Ranch (1997).[10] He had struck up a brotherly relationship with the band; he reacted positively to the demos that Adkins had played him.[11] The sales from Singles and the proceeds from Jimmy Eat World's European tour helped fund the album's recording sessions,[12] but the money budgeted for the record was insufficient. Trombino offered to work for free during the recording sessions, confident he would be reimbursed by the album's predicted commercial success.[13] Recording sessions took place in Los Angeles, California in October 2000.[14] Clark Robertson, who had been in a band that Linton saw live, rented equipment on the band's behalf.[15]

The drums were recorded at Cherokee Studios in Los Angeles, which proved costly to the group.[5][11] The band took a brief break to tour with Jebediah for two-and-a-half weeks, including a performance at CMJ's New Music Marathon festival, before returning to Los Angeles.[2][6] In order to save money, sessions moved to Harddrive in North Hollywood, where they did overdubs over the course of a month-and-a-half from November 2000.[11][16] Partway through, at the suggestion of Trombino, the band uploaded demo versions of songs on the music platform Napster for fans to hear.[17][18] By this point, A&R people from various labels visited the band, often unannounced. As a result of this, they had to lock the doors to keep people out.[19] The album was mixed at South Ecstasy Recording Studio, also in Los Angeles, in January 2001.[7][20] As Lind was writing a check to cover the cost of mixing, he was worried they were close to bankruptcy, and hoped it would not bounce.[5]

Lyrical themes and musical style[edit]

Two men playing guitar on-stage
Tom Linton (left) and Jim Adkins (right) were the main composers of Bleed American.

Overview[edit]

The material on Bleed American was more accessible and aggressive than its predecessor, which had a more "layered, sprawling sound."[21] In regard to the stylistic approach of the album, Adkins said, “Things still got pretty gnarly in the studio as far as experimentation, but it was always to an end that was complimentary [sic] to the song. We wanted to really make sure that we weren't doing things, like, just to put a wacky keyboard sound in. It had to be doing something constructive for the song.”[22] They intentionally strayed away from the complex writing of Clarity for simpler structures.[2] "Hear You Me" and "My Sundown" were initially intended for Go Big Casino, Adkin's orchestral side project.[23] Critics have described the genres of the album as alternative rock,[21][24] emo,[25][26] emo pop,[27] pop punk,[25] and power pop.[28] According to Adkins, the band called the album Bleed American as it the title-track dealt with "chang[ing] one's lie for the better", and as such that theme "runs throughout the entire album."[29]

The lyrical composition in Bleed American also remained rather direct and straightforward in comparison to Clarity. Mark Vanderhoff of Allmusic said that Bleed American didn't have any "16 minute songs," referencing "Goodbye Sky Harbor" from Clarity. Rather, he called the music on Bleed American "just straight-ahead rock & roll, performed with punk energy and alt-rock smarts."[21] Towards the end of touring in support of Clarity, Adkins began having what he thought was a heart attack. It was later revealed to be a panic attack, for which he had to take medication; the incident inspired some of the lyrics throughout the album.[5] Rachel Haden (of That Dog) lent her voice in "Hear You Me", "If You Don't, Don't", "Cautioners" and "My Sundown".[7]

Songs[edit]

Adkins said "Bleed American" is about how small, trivial things in a person's life can overtake the important things.[22] The grunge-lite track has been compared to the work of Helmet, At the Drive-In, and Braid.[30][31][32] When writing "A Praise Chorus", the band were stuck on the bridge section; they sent it to Davey von Bohlen (of The Promise Ring) who wrote a bridge referencing various popular songs,[22] including "Crimson and Clover" by Tommy James and the Shondells, "Our House" by Madness, "Kickstart My Heart" by Mötley Crüe and "Don't Let's Start" by They Might Be Giants.[21][22] Throughout "A Praise Chorus", which deals with nostalgia, Adkins employs a vocal stutter.[21][23] The new wave-esque "The Middle", includes a guitar solo that, according to Adkins, was a homage to Doug Gillard of Guided by Voices, and their song "I Am a Tree".[28][22][33] Its lyrics speak about "fitting in" and self-acceptance of oneself; Adkins wrote the song in response to an email from a fan who felt they were "not punk enough".[21][34] Lind said his drums on the song were an attempt to emulate the ones heard in "You Wreck Me" by Tom Petty.[35]

"Your House" details the pain of a break-up, cutting all communication with the person, and was reminiscent of the work of Versus.[28][36] The drum parts were played in unison by Lind, Adkins and Trombino, as Lind wanted something similar to a marching band.[37] "Sweetness" was one of the songs that Adkins had more doubts about because of its lyrical content: "I just had this melody in my head and I was demoing it and singing it and kind of having a hard time with it. I almost didn't bring it to the band because I was thinking to myself, ’I can't just say nothing. I can't just use all these sort of alyrical whoahs for this much of a song.’"[22] The whoah vocalizations were intended as a placeholder for other lyrics, though as the members were unable to come up with anything else, the parts remained.[38] It incorporates influences from post-hardcore and second-wave emo.[30] A demo version of the tune was recorded during the Clarity sessions, though Capitol Records did not think much of the track, so the band scrapped it.[39][40]

"Hear You Me" is a tribute to Mykel and Carli Allan, two popular Weezer fans, who died in a car accident while returning home after a concert.[41] The guitarwork uses a countermelody against the vocals; it features the inclusion of a piano, organ, horns, and Haden's vocals.[23] "If You Don't, Don't" tackles the theme of lost love; the guitars were initially much faster in the style of the Wedding Present, until Adkins slowed it down.[42][43] "Get It Faster" opens with a minute of drum fills, which were programmed in the PlayStation game MTV Music Generator.[23][44] "Cautioners" is a five-minute electropop song that meshes electronica and rock.[31] It channelled the sound of the Cars, and recalls the quieter songs on Clarity.[21][45] An earlier version of the track, released on a split EP with Jebediah, was centered around guitar strums.[23][46] The version on the album features heavy use of decay, which Adkins said sounded "computerized".[47] The drums were made up of several loops that were made at Cherokee, done over the course of a few days.[48] The title and lyrics of "The Authority Song" are a direct reference to "Authority Song" by John Cougar Mellencamp, and it also contains a reference to Automatic, an album by the Jesus and Mary Chain.[49] The album concludes with the ballad "My Sundown".[32]

Release[edit]

DreamWorks Records' A&R member Luke Wood monitored the band's potential from when they became free agents, and offered to help them.[5][50] The band considered it, but it was not until a year later when they returned to contact him.[50][5] By then, the industry hype behind the forthcoming album caused a bidding war between labels.[5] The band met with various staff members from six labels in Los Angeles and New York City in March 2001, before eventually signing to DreanWorks in the following month.[20][5][51] Capitol Records had unsuccessfully tried to re-sign the band after hearing the finished album; the band said they would have a meeting if the label would give them their master recordings back.[52]

Soon afterwards, the band enlisted a new booking agent and co-managers Gary Gersh and John Silva; they knew Gersh from when he was CEO at Capitol a few years prior.[34][53] Despite these new representatives, Lind continued acting as the band's de facto manager, a role he had been doing for two years by that point.[5] Bleed American was made available for streaming on July 19, 2001,[54] before being released five days later.[7] The album artwork, showing a set of bowling trophies sitting on top of a cigarette machine, is taken from William Eggleston's photograph "Memphis".[55] Out of concern that its title could be misinterpreted following the September 11 attacks, the album was re-released with an eponymous title in December 2001, despite the band initially saying that would not change its name.[29][55][56] The decision was ultimately the band's, which was supported by their label; instead of recalling existing copies, they simply had the name amended with subsequent pressings of the album.[57] In addition, the title-track was renamed "Salt Sweat Sugar", and reissued on December 11, 2001.[58][59]

Singles and EPs[edit]

"Bleed American" was released to radio on June 5, 2001, and released as a single on August 21, 2001.[60][61] The US 7" vinyl version included a demo of "Your House", while the German CD edition featured, demos of "Your House" and "The Authority Song", alongside "(Splash) Turn Twist", and the music video for "Bleed American" (directed by Ross Richardson).[62][63][64]

"The Middle" was released as a single on November 19, 2001.[65] The UK 7" vinyl included a radio session version of "A Praise Chorus" as its B-side, while the European CD featured "No Sensitivity", and demos of "The Middle" and "My Sundown".[66][67] Another CD version, which saw release in Europe and the US featured radio sessions versions of "If You Don't, Don't" and "Game of Pricks", as well as the music video for "The Middle".[68] This music video sees a clothed man in a crowd of people in their underwear, and falls in love with a clothed woman.[69] It was directed by Paul Fedor, who based it on an episode of The Brady Bunch.[35]

"Sweetness" was released as a single on June 3, 2002; the UK 7" vinyl version included a live version of "Clarity" as its B-side.[70][71] Two CD versions were released in Europe: the first with live versions of "Blister" and "Your New Aesthetic", while the other included live versions of "If You Don't, Don't", "Lucky Denver Mint", and "Blister".[72][73] The music video for "Sweetness" shows the band in stationary as the world is altered around them; it was filmed in Los Angeles, with director Tim Hope. Lind said the video was "loosely based on a general journey of what a band goes through as they start and as they progress".[74] "A Praise Chorus" was released as a promotional single in 2002.[75]

In addition to the album's singles, two EPs were released to support Bleed American. The first of these EPs, titled Good to Go EP, was released on February 22, 2002 exclusively in Japan, and featured "Spangle", "The Most Beautiful Things", an acoustic version of "The Middle", a radio sesion version of "Game of Pricks", an early version of "Cautioners", and live versions of "A Praise Chorus" and "Softer".[7][76] The second EP, titled The Middle/A Praise Chorus Tour EP, was a tour EP released in Australia in January 2003, consisting of "The Middle", "A Praise Chorus", "Firestarter", an acoustic version of "The Middle", and a live version of "Bleed American".[7][77]

Subsequent events and releases[edit]

Bleed American was initially released on vinyl through Grand Royal Records; when that label folded, it was re-pressed through Adkins' own label Western Tread in 2003.[78][79] In October 2003, the band released the Believe in What You Want video album, which chronicled the making-of and release of Bleed American.[80] On April 28, 2008, a deluxe edition of the album was released with a bonus disc containing several B-sides, acoustic versions, live versions, demo versions and previously unreleased tracks. The original album and track title Bleed American were restored for this release.[55] This edition was pressed on vinyl in 2011 as part of Record Store Day.[25] Later that year, the band performed Bleed American and Clarity in their entireties for two UK shows.[81]

Touring[edit]

Following two one-off US shows in February 2002, Jimmy Eat World embarked on a two-week tour of Germany.[20] In June 2001, the band then went on a tour of Australia and Japan, the latter being a supporting slot for Eastern Youth.[20][82] Following this, they made their second appearance on Warped Tour, where they played the East Coast shows in July and August 2001, and supported Blink-182 and Weezer.[20][22][60] In August and September 2001, the band appeared on The Late Late Show with Craig Kilborn (around which, the band played three shows in Los Angeles) and the Late Show with David Letterman,[83][84] and performed at Edgefest II in Canada.[85] In November and December 2001, they supported Weezer on their Extended Midget Tour in the US; Jimmy Eat World were augmented by touring musicians Brian McMahan (of the For Carnation) on sampler, keyboards and guitar, and Haden on backing vocals.[22][86] Alongside this, the band performed on Late Night with Conan O'Brien.[87] In January and February 2002, the band were due to support Blink-182 on their tour of Europe; however, when that band postponed, Jimmy Eat World embarked on a headlining European tour instead.[88]

After returning to the US, Jimmy Eat World played four southern shows, before traveling to Japan, where they played until March 2002.[88] On April 6, 2002, the band performed on Saturday Night Live.[89] The band supported on Blink-182 and Green Day on their co-headlining US Pop Disaster Tour in April and May 2002.[90] On April 22, 2002, the band performed on The Tonight Show with Jay Leno.[91] Following this, Jimmy Eat World supported Incubus on their headlining tour of Australia.[92] In May 2002, the band toured the UK with support from the Promise Ring, before they returned to the US for a series of festival appearances and a few Canadian shows in June.[93] On June 6, the band appeared on the Late Show with David Letterman.[94] They embarked on a headlining US tour in July and August, with support from Desaparecidos, Recover, and the Promise Ring. Following this, the band performed at the Reading and Leeds Festivals in the UK.[93] On September 5, the band appeared on Last Call with Carson Daly.[95] In September and October, the band performed on two dates of the Plea for Peace/Take Action Tour, and at This Ain't No Pinic festival.[96][97]

Reception[edit]

Original reviews[edit]

Original release
Review scores
SourceRating
AllMusic4.5/5 stars[21]
Blender3/5 stars[98]
Entertainment WeeklyB[99]
Los Angeles Times2.5/4 stars[100]
NME8/10[101]
Pitchfork3.5/10[102]
Rolling Stone3.5/5 stars[45]
Slant Magazine3.5/5 stars[103]
USA Today3.5/4 stars[104]
The Village VoiceC+[105]

Bleed American was met with generally favourable reviews from music critics. Aubin Paul of Punknews.org stated that unlike the band's prior albums, the second half of Bleed American was "quite strong, and really fleshes out the musical ideas from the record."[26] While noting that those who dislike "emo or 'poppier' music" would dislike the album, Paul ultimately concluded that "the punker-than-thou kids should stick with Static Prevails, but a catalog as impressive a J.E.W.'s can be appreciated by anyone without preconceptions."[26] Drowned in Sound's Terry Bezer called the album "eleven of the finest songs you’ll hear this, or any other, year".[106] AllMusic's Mark Vanderhoff praised its "compelling lyrics, driving guitar work, and insanely catchy melodies".[21]

Entertainment Weekly described the album as a "fine balancing act" of "emo-edged" tracks and "wallop-packed rockers."[99] Joe Warminsky III The Morning Call opined that the album was absent of emo elements, describing it instead as "an open-hearted, shiny-sounding rock disc".[107] Steve Hochman of the Los Angeles Times commented that "Those graduating from teen tastes could well turn to this album as a first step to adulthood."[100] Aaron Scott of Slant Magazine praised the maturity the band showed through the album, noting that it had the capability to attract a wide-ranging audience.[103] Rolling Stone reviewer Barry Walters stated that "Bleed American sports the tender turbulence that insular emo kids have been enjoying in private for years," with the album appealing to fans of Creed and Blink-182 as well as new wave music.[45] Blender gave the album a mixed review, saying that the album's mainstream potential was "undercut by guitars, which are neither as gleefully blaring as Weezer's nor as cleanly melodic as the Knack's."[98] Writing for The Village Voice, Robert Christgau stated "if this band can't be maturity's answer to 'N Sync, it can be patriotism's answer to Travis."[105] Pitchfork gave a much more negative and sarcastic review of the album. Reviewer Ryan Schreiber ended his review with "So do the best you can, listen to your favorite band, bury your head in the sand, before it all begins again. Hey, I just wrote a Jimmy Eat World song!"[102]

Retrospective reviews[edit]

Retrospective reviews
Review scores
SourceRating
AbsolutePunk97%[25]
PopMatters6/10 stars[108]
Punknews.org3.5/5 stars[109]
Sputnikmusic3.5/5[24]
Tiny Mix Tapes3/5 stars[110]

Thomas Nassiff of AbsolutePunk stated that "praising this album is something that can't be done enough" and opined that the album contained "no bad songs", concluding: "Certainly one of the most memorable records of 2001, Bleed American might actually have the most lasting power of any album from that class."[25] Mike Stagno of Sputnikmusic praised Bleed American as "an enjoyable, catchy mainstream rock album" and noted its high replay value, particularly tracks such as "Sweetness" and "Get It Faster".[24] A guest writer for Tiny Mix Tapes said the album's "best moments" were the "stripped down" tracks.[110]

Louder Than War writer Sam Lambeth saw the album as a "hallmark of modern rock, a faultless record that may wear its heart on its sleeve, but elevates in its earnestness".[111] Punknews.org staff member Brian Shultz reviewed the deluxe edition, and was "surpris[ed by] how much the thing still plain rocks"[109] PopMatters's Charles A. Hohman said that while it was "an excellent album, the Deluxe Edition is significantly less so", and added that apart from the reinstated title, "there's little insight or revelation here."[108]

Commercial performance and accolades[edit]

Bleed American was a commercial success, helping the band gain mainstream popularity. As well as its platinum certification in the United States[112] and Canada by the Canadian Recording Industry Association (CRIA).[113] The album was also certified Silver by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI).[114] The album became a bestseller, and in its first four months on the market, it sold 173,000 copies, making Bleed American Jimmy Eat World's most successful album.[115] Lind said that these sales were "definitely a big deal to the band because it shows how the fanbase is growing. [If you're] doing anything creative, you want more and more people to enjoy what you do."[115] The album was certified gold in the United States in March 2002, and it had reached platinum status by August.[112] It peaked at number 54 on the Billboard 200 on August 11, 2001.[116] The album's most successful single was "The Middle". It managed to reach the number-one spot on the Billboard Modern Rock Tracks chart and number five on the Billboard Hot 100.[116] As of September 2016, the album has sold over 1.6 million copies.[117]

Q listed Bleed American as one of the best 50 albums of 2001,[118] while Consequence of Sound ranked it at number nine on their list of the top 10 albums of the year.[119] The album was included in Rock Sound's 101 Modern Classics list at number 48.[120] In 2013, it was ranked at number 429 on NME's The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time list.[121] NME listed the album as one of "20 Pop Punk Albums Which Will Make You Nostalgic",[122] as well as one of "20 Emo Albums That Have Resolutely Stood The Test Of Time".[123] The album was ranked at number 183 on Spin's "The 300 Best Albums of the Past 30 Years (1985–2014)" list.[124] In 2017, Rolling Stone ranked the album at number 25 on their list of the 50 Greatest Pop-Punk Albums.[125] "Sweetness" appeared on a best-of emo songs list by Vulture.[126]

Accolades for Bleed American
Publication List Rank Ref.
Addicted to Noise Albums of the Year 40
Alternative Press Albums of the Year 6
Blender Albums of the Year 28
CMJ Albums of the Year N/A
Consequence of Sound Top 100 Albums of the 2000s 70
Drowned in Sound Albums of the Year 30
Eins Live Albums of the Year 20
Junkee The 10 Most Important Emo Albums N/A
Kerrang! Albums of the Year 3
LAS Magazine Albums of the Year 17
Mondo Sonoro Albums of the Year 1
NME The 500 Greatest Albums of All Time 429
Spin The 300 Best Albums of the Past 30 Years 183
Q Albums of the Year N/A

Track listing[edit]

All songs written by Jimmy Eat World, except "A Praise Chorus", which contains lyrics from various songs.[note 1][7]

No.TitleLength
1."Bleed American" (listed as "Salt Sweat Sugar" on the self-titled version)3:02
2."A Praise Chorus"4:03
3."The Middle"2:46
4."Your House"4:46
5."Sweetness"3:40
6."Hear You Me"4:45
7."If You Don't, Don't"4:33
8."Get It Faster"4:22
9."Cautioners"5:21
10."The Authority Song"3:38
11."My Sundown"5:40

Bonus tracks

Japanese/vinyl bonus track[129]
No.TitleLength
12."(Splash) Turn Twist"4:09
Deluxe edition disc one[130]
No.TitleLength
12."The Most Beautiful Things" (from Good to Go / Jebediah split)3:51
13."No Sensitivity" (from German "The Middle" single / Jebediah split)3:41
14."(Splash) Turn Twist" (from The Middle EP / Firestarter EP)4:10
Deluxe edition disc two[130]
No.TitleLength
1."Cautioners" (demo, from Good to Go EP / Jebediah split)3:49
2."Firestarter" (The Prodigy cover, originally from Firestarter EP)6:24
3."Get It Faster" (AOL version, previously unreleased)3:44
4."Bleed American" (live, from the A Praise Chorus EP)3:02
5."A Praise Chorus" (live, from Good to Go)3:53
6."Softer" (live, from Good to Go)4:14
7."The Middle" (acoustic, from the A Praise Chorus EP)3:10
8."If You Don't, Don't" (XFM version, from British "The Middle" single)4:45
9."Game of Pricks" (Guided by Voices cover, from British "The Middle" single / Good to Go EP)1:55
10."The Authority Song" (demo, from German "The Middle" single)3:10
11."My Sundown" (from Believe in What You Want)5:23
12."Sweetness" (live, previously unreleased)4:05
13."Last Christmas" (Wham! cover, from Last Christmas EP)4:27
14."My Sundown" (demo, from German "The Middle" single)3:08
15."Spangle" (from Good to Go EP / Singles)4:36
16."Hear You Me" (from Believe in What You Want)4:48
17."The Middle" (demo, from German "The Middle" single)2:48
18."Your House 2007" (previously unreleased)4:00

Personnel[edit]

Personnel per 2008 reissue booklet.[7]

Charts and certifications[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Lyrics from "Crimson and Clover" (Thomas Gregory Jackson, Peter P. Lucia, Jr.), "Our House" (Chris Foreman, Cathal Smyth), "Why Did Ever We Meet" and "All of My Everythings" (The Promise Ring), "Rock 'n' Roll Fantasy" (Paul Rodgers), "Don't Let's Start" (John Flansburgh, John Linnell), and "Kickstart My Heart" (Nikki Sixx) appear in the bridge of "A Praise Chorus".

References[edit]

Citations

  1. ^ a b c Leahey, Andrew. "Artist Biography". AllMusic. Archived from the original on June 22, 2016. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  2. ^ a b c d Schild, Matt (October 26, 2000). "Seller's Market". Dallas Observer. Archived from the original on March 6, 2021. Retrieved July 20, 2021.
  3. ^ a b "Jimmy Eat World". Burly Bear Network. July 28, 2001. Archived from the original on November 14, 2004. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  4. ^ "Zach Lind of Jimmy Eat World". Modern Drummer. May 12, 2004. Archived from the original on August 6, 2016. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  5. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k Mehr, Bob (September 27, 2001). "Brave New World". Phoenix New Times. Archived from the original on January 10, 2016. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  6. ^ a b "News". Jimmy Eat World. Archived from the original on October 5, 2000. Retrieved July 21, 2021.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Bleed American (Booklet). Jimmy Eat World. DreamWorks/Geffen/UMe/Interscope. 2008 [first released in 2001]. B0011062-02/STDPVCOSLV/B0011062-02 BK02.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  8. ^ Static Prevails (Booklet). Jimmy Eat World. Capitol. 1996. 7243 5 39615 0 3.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  9. ^ Clarity (liner notes). Capitol Records. 1999. 7243 5 39616 0 2.
  10. ^ Dude Ranch (liner notes). Blink-182. US: Cargo Music/MCA Records. 1997. CRGD-11624.CS1 maint: others in cite AV media (notes) (link)
  11. ^ a b c Cannon, Jesse (July–August 2003). "Mark Trombino: Jimmy Eat World, Drive Like Jehu, Blink 182". Tape Op. Archived from the original on January 19, 2021. Retrieved July 20, 2021.
  12. ^ "Jimmy Eat World". Pollstar.com. March 25, 2002. Archived from the original on September 18, 2016. Retrieved June 27, 2016.
  13. ^ Seigel, Stephen. "A Jimmy Eat World article that does not contain the word 'emo'". Tucson Weekly. Archived from the original on August 19, 2016. Retrieved June 28, 2016.
  14. ^ Paul, Aubin (October 26, 2000). "Jimmy Eat World Records LP4". Punknews.org. Archived from the original on July 29, 2019. Retrieved July 29, 2019.
  15. ^ Jimmy Eat World 2005a, event occurs at 20:04–13.
  16. ^ Jimmy Eat World 2005a, event occurs at 20:39.
  17. ^ Jimmy Eat World 2005b, event occurs at 3:53–4:03.
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Sources

See also[edit]

External links[edit]