Bleisure travel

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Bleisure travel (UK /ˈbleʒ.əʳ/ US /ˈbliː.ʒɚ/) is a portmanteau of “business” and “leisure”, and, it refers to “the activity of combining business travel with leisure time”.[1]

The term bleisure was first published in 2009 by the Future Laboratory as part of their biannual Trend Briefing. The term was originally coined by writer and silent revolutionist, Jacob Strand, then a future forecaster working for The Future Laboratory. And co-written by journalist and futurologist Miriam Rayman.

In corporate business travel, extending a business trip for personal purposes is also known as “bizcation”[2]

This phenomenon has been studied from 2011, from this year on, a report shows that bleisure travel has been maintaining a constant growth, accounting for 7% of all business trips.[3]

Bleisure traveller profiles[edit]

Bleisure travellers can be described as “individuals who combine leisure with professional business obligations when abroad[4]”.

The elements characterising bleisure travellers are some and different, this make difficult to draw a defined profile of these individuals. Bleisure is a widespread practice among US travellers, especially for those working in Technology, Healthcare, Public Administration sectors. A report shows that US traveller add bleisure to nearly half of the cases, precisely 52% for International trips and 42% for domestic ones. The main reasons for travelling would be conferences and conventions, team building, client meetings and presentations.[5]

Bleisure travellers could be grouped according to various aspects, in particular gender, age and trip frequency.[6]

A research indicates that female business travellers would be more likely to take bleisure trips than male. In both groups 20% of travellers would take one or more bleisure trips in a year time, however women look to register higher rate: 8.5% against 6.8% of men.[notes 1]

Younger travellers (between 20 and 25) look significantly more likely to add weekends to their business trips, measuring a rate close to 15%. This result is two or three times higher than those for 45-50 age interval.[notes 2] Millennials travellers deserve a special attention because they appear to be the individuals shaping the future of business travel, nearly twice likely to travel for business than Baby Boomers.[3] This could be attributed to their flexible attitude to life, which would lead to the blurring of the line between their private and professional life. Millennials seem to work often from home or during the evening hours, to dedicate leisure on-goings to traditional work hours. A consequence of this freedom could be their willingness to extend business trips including vacation activities. In comparison with other age group, Millennials look to be more likely to take bleisure trips, compared to older travellers. However, it is not clear whether this reflects unique preferences or transitory life events.[notes 3]

Frequent travellers taking 20 trips or more per year seem to be less than 5% likely to take a bleisure trip during the year, they would account for 8% of all bleisure trips. By contrast, one third of all bleisure trips would be taken by employees travelling once a month.

Factors influencing the phenomenon[edit]

It seems evident that Millennials workers are increasingly demanding for bleisure from their work trip. Despite the state-of-the-art technology available nowadays, Millennials still prefer face-to-face meetings to get business done, therefore travel is still important for business companies.[7]

Bleisure travel looks as a good opportunity to save on travel expenses, mostly for those who do not take a lot of vacation: 66% of US business traveller spend more money on leisure activities because of the money they save on travel. 60% take bleisure trips because do not have a lot of regular vacations. To decide whether to turn a business travel into bleisure or not, employee takes into consideration travelling on exciting destinations, additional costs required to extend the trip, how close the trip is to the weekend, the number of night they must stay for business, how affordable the hotel is, whether they have friends or family in the area, whether they can bring friends or family along. The general trend would indicate the addition of one or two days as the most frequent option, only 23% of bleisure travellers would extend their trips for more than three days. In many cases leisure days equal (37%) or even exceed business days (42%). The length of business trip seems to be a crucial factor when considering extending the trip in 62% of cases. In particular, when business days are more than three, bleisure travellers are not only likely to extend the trip, but also to visit different cities in the area.[5]

Advantages for employee and companies[edit]

For the employees:[8]

For the companies:

  • Improvement of the knowledge about the culture of the location they’re visiting that would simplify business negotiations;
  • Possibility to have happier and therefore more productive employees;
  • Discounted rate offered by the hotels;
  • Opportunity to recruit new workers and attempting to retain current ones.

Main activities and destinations[edit]

The more likely bleisure destinations are cities offering a combination of different elements, which could allow the travellers to add leisure time to their business trip, such as sightseeing locations, sport venues and cultural events.[5]

The difference between the origin and the destination city seems to affect bleisure rates: in the case of domestic trips, the amount of bleisure is expected to be low because the two cities should be easily accessible and share similar culture. On the other hand, long intercontinental trips would offer the chance to know realities that are different from ordinary. Researches seem to confirm this trend: bleisure trips would account for 5.2% of the domestic trips and 9.7% of the international ones. The highest bleisure rate (18.4%) appears in international trips when the origin and destination cities are located in different geographical regions.[5]

The top bleisure cities in US are: Honolulu (above 20%), Miami, Orlando, Las Vegas (12-15%) NYC, San Francisco, Los Angeles, San Diego and Fort Lauderdale (9-12%). In Europe rates looks lower, this could be due to the shorter domestic and continental routes: Lisbon, Barcelona, Nice, Istanbul (8-11%), London, Dublin, Amsterdam, Moscow, Rome, Geneva, Paris, Madrid (6-8%).[6]

Corporate policy[edit]

Given that bleisure travel is a rising phenomenon, there is still no official regulation, therefore extending business trips for bleisure would have to be decided by management on a case-by-case basis. Some preventive measures[9] could be followed in advance to avoid misunderstanding.

  • Companies have to differentiate between business and non-business amenities and declare what is willing to pay for;
  • Employees have to define when the business travel ends and when the leisure one starts;
  • Company and employees must arrange a corporate travel insurance.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ To explain this observation, CWT have looked at the average number of bleisure trips per bleisure travellers per year, this was roughly the same value for both genders (1.4). However, women take overall fewer business trips than men, on average. This difference in the total amount of business travel is responsible for the higher bleisure rate measured in the female population.
  2. ^ To explain this finding, CWT calculated the average number of bleisure trips in each segment. Across the age range 20 to 65, this varies from 1.3 to 1.5 bleisure trips/year. At the same time, the amount of total travel varies much more significantly (+2 trips/year), from the 20-25 to the 45-50 age interval. The larger denominator in the bleisure rate is thus responsible for the lower values observed in the 45-50 group. Interpretation: these results show that travellers appear to have fixed capacity for bleisure: when they do it, they take 1 or bleisure trips per year, almost irrespective of how much they travel. In other words, bleisure does not scale with the total amount of travel.
  3. ^ Do take more bleisure trips than other generations did in their 20s and 30s? Or will Millennials take much fewer bleisure trips in later years? It seems possible that Millennials are actually different. One observation in particular would reinforce this idea: When business travellers have children, they seem to be equally likely to extend their trip, compared to those who do not have them. This would suggest that, when Millennials will have families in greater numbers, they may still take bleisure trips

References[edit]

  1. ^ "About words. New words – 1 January 2018". Cambridge Dictionary. 1 January 2018.
  2. ^ Zak, Karen (2016). "Maximizing the value of conferences to communities: 'Bleisure Travel' and 'Bizcations' emerge with social media boosts".
  3. ^ a b Global Business Travel Association in partnership with Hilton (June 2017). "Extending business travel into leisure time – Bleisure study". GBTA Foundation.
  4. ^ Lichy, McLeay, Jessica, Fraser (August 2017). "Bleisure, motivation and typologies". Journal of Travel & Tourism Marketing – via Research Gate.
  5. ^ a b c d Expedia Media Solutions and Luth Research (6 December 2016). "Profile of American bleisure traveller". Expedia Media Solutions Blog.
  6. ^ a b CWT Solutions Group (July 2016). "A quantitative look at the bleisure phenomenon" (PDF). Carson Wagonlit Travel.
  7. ^ GBTA Foundation (2015). "GBTA Business Traveler Sentiment Index™".
  8. ^ ""Welcome to the world of bleisure: the trend is growing of adding leisure time to the business trip."".
  9. ^ "American Express Global Business Travel".